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Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar
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Letters from Henry Jackson to Leslie Stephen and Nora Sidgwick; notes by Henry Jackson and Nora Sidgwick

Typewritten copy of letter. Refers to 'some rough memoranda [included] about the share which Henry Sidgwick took in College and University business.' Adds that he is not writing anything 'with a view to its incorporation, solid, in [Stephen's] article', and that he is merely putting down a few facts, and that Stephen may use them how he wishes.

Memoranda including information on awards and scholarships, appointment and resignation as fellow, etc., taken from the Trinity College admissions book, the university calendar, the ' "Bursar's Minutes" '. Also contains Jackson's own recollections of Sidgwick, with reference to himself and others. Refers to Sidgwick's membership of the 'governing body' [of Trinity College], and his promotion of the abolition of tests in the University and his campaign for the repeal of all religious restrictions on the election and conditions of tenure of Fellows as then contained in the statutes.

Relates Sidgwick's' involvement in the campaign for women's education. Remarks, however, that he was not 'at first one of the active promoters' of the plan for examinations for women. States that the prime mover was F.W.H. Myers, 'inspired by Mrs Butler, and refers to a meeting held in London in December 1866 or 1867 to discuss the establishment of a private association to examine women, which Sidgwick did not attend. Claims that after the University had taken up the project and instituted the Higher Local Examination, and a demand arose for teaching in Cambridge to prepare women for it, Sidgwick 'threw himself with unexpected energy into the work of organizing lectures, and from that time forward his zeal for the cause never flagged.'

Refers to 'the abortive College statutes of 13 December 1872', in which Sidgwick had no part because he was not at the time a fellow; and to the Burn-Morgan memorial of 5 December 1872, which Sidgwick signed, and which specified 'four reforms which "would increase the educational efficiency of the University, and at the same time promote the advancement of science and learning." ' Claims that the matter was settled at his [Jackson's] rooms. States that Sidgwick was not a fellow when the existing codes of college statutes were made under the powers of the Commission of 1877-1881, but that in December 1879 and January 1880 he was 'one of a group of academic liberals who met at Trotter's rooms to discuss the Commissioners' tentative scheme of University and College legislation.' Relates that Sidgwick was nominated in 1882 by the Special Board for Moral Science to be its representative on the General Board of Studies, and that he supported the argument for the money derived from the colleges to be spent in the partial endowment of many posts, rather that in the complete endowment of a few.

Speaks of his admiration for Sidgwick during the debates on the duties of professors, and claims that, despite being a professor himself, Sidgwick took 'a large and generous view' of the work that they should be expected to do. Refers to his [Jackson's] regret at HS' departure from the General Board of Studies. Refers to Sidgwick's interest in the difficulties that the colleges faced in relation to the payment of taxes to the University, and claims that his scheme of relaxation failed 'by reason of its excessive subtlety and elaboration.' Refers to his membership of the Council of the Senate from 1890 to 1898, and states that he attended regularly, and took an active and lively part in discussion. Remarks that he seemed to him 'to have conservatized, and he had little sympathy with uneducated people.' States that he was 'a frequent, ready, and singularly effective speaker in our little parliament held in the Arts School', and adds that it would not have surprised him if he had stood for Parliament.

Refers to his fairness in regard to debates, and his impartial treatment of opposing views. Defends him against the charge that he ' "sat on the fence" ' on certain issues, and claims that he held very strongly the view that he took, but 'was apt to change his point of view.' In relation to Sidgwick's 'munificent benefactions to the University', states that he is continually grateful for the gift which brought Maitland back to the University. Concludes by saying that he does not know how to write about the years between 1862 and 1872, 'when his astonishing maturity made him potent among the younger Trinity men', and claims that during the previous summer he [Jackson] has been 'living perpetually in that time.'

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Letter from Henry Jackson to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that he intends to be in Cambridge all the following week, and that he would very much like to see the letters of which she speaks. States that he had intended to send with this letter the notices of the College meetings for 1865, 1867 and 1868, and two notices for a meeting for the alteration of statutes in 1869, but hopes to go to the College library the following day to fill up the missing year, 1866, and undertakes to send all the documents together. Refers also to his intention to verify that Henry Sidgwick began to lecture on Moral Sciences in October 1867. States that he had not fully realised the extent of Henry's activity with regard to the College meetings etc. between 1865 and 1869. Refers to the Classical Tripos Syndicate, which led to the reforms that took effect in the examination of 1872. States that she would be able to get the date of 'the pamphlet from Mr Clark at the Registry, where, he claims, she would also find 'a very amusing fly-sheet, in which Henry describes Dr Guest, the Master of Caius, as "that dashing innovator".' Wishes that he had revised his notes before she copied them, as some of them were 'both hasty and rough.'

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Letter from Henry Jackson to James Ward

Expresses his gratitude for Ward's having called his attention 'to the dialogue between Henry Sidgwick and John Grote in the C[lassical] R[eview] for March 1889' [“A Discussion Between Professor Henry Sidgwick and the Late Professor John Grote, on the Utilitarian Basis of Plato's Republic.” (1889) 3 Classical Review 97], and hopes that he will see his way to publishing it. Refers to the fact that Sidgwick always had an interest in the subject and 'always comes to this question from the point of view of ancient ethics.' Finds it surprising that he never read that 'curious paper', and reports that he 'read with great care [ ] Wilson's mendacious attack upon Archer Hind.' Explains that at the time, however, he had been very busy, and had completely forgotten that the paper had appeared. Remarks that 'anything of Sidgwick's about ancient ethics ought to be considered', since it always seemed to him that the subject 'had an especial fascination for him, and brought out in full force his critical quality.' Returns with the letter the copy of the Classical Review [not included]. Also expresses his gratitude to Ward for his having given him his paper 'on the [ ] of psychology', which he 'shall read with all the more interest' because he is lecturing on [Aristotle's?] De Anima and believes that the paper will very directly bear upon that subject.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Letter from Henry Jackson to Nora Sidgwick

Returns to her with thanks her list of members of the Ad Eundem [included]; dates it 'not earlier than the spring of 1866, when W.H. Thompson became Master [of Trinity] and it is not later than the autumn of 1868' when he [Jackson] was elected. Thinks that the likely date is 1867. Gives a list of those he believes were the founders; includes the names of Henry Sidgwick, H. Fawcett, A. Sidgwick, W.C. Sidgwick, G.O. Trevelyan etc. Lists the names of some men who came later. States that from January 1872 he has a complete list. Refers to Arthur [Sidgwick's] resignation in December 1877, and his reelection in May 1879. He always regards the Ad Eundem 'as one of Henry's good works'; it has been very useful as a link between the universities of Oxford and Cambridge. Referring to the printed list, states that he believes that 'the written supplements are Munro's.'

Printed list entitled 'Ad Eundem Club/List of Members.' Lists members of the club, with their addresses. MS annotations.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Letter from Henry Jackson to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks Nora for her invitation to dine with her on 18 April, but regrets that he must decline, as they expect 'Hal [their son] from India on the 20th', and he shall not return to Cambridge until 22 or 23 April. In relation to Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir, states that both he and Maggie have read 'in it', and feel that Nora has 'completely succeeded.' Informs her of a mistake on page 32, in which it is claimed that Brookfield was a member of the Apostles' Society: Brookfield was a friend of his father's, and was 'an excellent talker', but 'did not care enough about things to be a good Apostle.' Jackson quotes from a letter from his 'oldest living friend, Dr Melland', referring to Henry Sidgwick's love of truth, clear reasoning and logical power, his unselfish devotion to education in every direction, and his willing sacrifice of time and money, when needful to carry on any good cause.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Letter from Henry Jackson to Nora Sidgwick

Says he made an exact copy of the list of the Ad Eundem [see 103/57], but asks Nora to send it back to him if it turns up, as it is 'the only early record of the Society.' Regarding to the three photographs [of Henry Sidgwick] that he sends [see 103/60], claims the 'carte de visite head' taken by Guggenheim in Oxford was not his. Thinks that the oval photograph 'excellently represents Henry as he was soon after he took his degree.' Adds that he has, and values, Mr [ ] Smith's 'admirable portrait.'

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Letter from Henry Jackson to Nora Sidgwick

'Fred Myers; poem of 1870 in "The translation of Faith". [Public Session of Oecumenical Council etc]. Poems 1870, p.74, A Renewal of Youth, 1882, p.1.'

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Henry Jackson: correspondence A

One of thirteen boxes of Henry Jackson's correspondence, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, and catalogued as Add.Ms.c.24-47.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Henry Jackson: correspondence B.1

One of thirteen boxes of Henry Jackson's correspondence, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, and catalogued as Add.Ms.c.24-47.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Henry Jackson: correspondence B.2

One of thirteen boxes of Henry Jackson's correspondence, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, and catalogued as Add.Ms.c.24-47.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Henry Jackson: correspondence C

One of thirteen boxes of Henry Jackson's correspondence, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, and catalogued as Add.Ms.c.24-47.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Henry Jackson: correspondence D

One of thirteen boxes of Henry Jackson's correspondence, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, and catalogued as Add.Ms.c.24-47.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Henry Jackson: correspondence E

One of thirteen boxes of Henry Jackson's correspondence, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, and catalogued as Add.Ms.c.24-47.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Henry Jackson: correspondence F

Part of one of thirteen boxes of Henry Jackson's correspondence, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, and catalogued as Add.Ms.c.24-47.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

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