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Additional Manuscripts a

  • ADD.MS.a
  • Fonds
  • 17th -20th cent

The additional manuscript series are artificial groupings, mostly of single items or very small archival entities, but in some cases large archives have been inserted in these series.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Additional Manuscripts b

  • ADD.MS.b
  • Fonds
  • [16th?] -20th cent

The additional manuscript series are artificial groupings, mostly of single items or very small archival entities, but in some cases large archives have been inserted in these series.

There are two gaps in the numbered run, from 167-170 and 173-174. These numbers were never used for material.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Additional Manuscripts c

  • ADD.MS.c
  • Fonds
  • [c13th-20th cent.]

The additional manuscript series are artificial groupings, mostly of single items or very small archival entities, but in some cases large archives have been inserted in these series.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Additional Manuscripts d

  • ADD.MS.d
  • Fonds
  • 18th-20th cent

The additional manuscript series are artificial groupings, mostly of single items or very small archival entities, but in some cases large archives have been inserted in these series.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Papers of Frank Adams

  • ADMS
  • Fonds
  • 1949–1989

The collection is particularly noteworthy for its coverage of Adams's lectures, research and incoming correspondence.
Section A, Biographical, is not substantial. It includes a little material of Adams's relating to his own career including three Bedford School notebooks and his PhD thesis, and material assembled by I M James during the preparation of his Royal Society memoir.
Section B, Research, provides extensive documentation of Adams's research from the 1950s until his death. It is presented in an alphabetical sequence arranged by subject title.
Section C, Lectures, is the largest in the collection. Two subsections comprise Adams's lecture notes and other teaching material for courses given at Manchester and Cambridge, and material from conferences and seminars attended by Adams throughout the world including drafts of Adams's contributions and notes of contributions by others. A third subsection consists of Adams's ms notes found in filing cabinet drawers labelled 'Other people's lectures'. It includes notes taken by Adams as an undergraduate at Cambridge in 1949.
Section D, Publications, is very slight. It includes drafts of a few of Adams's scientific papers.
Section E, Correspondence, contains virtually no extended exchanges of correspondence as very few copies of Adams's own letters survive. There is, however, significant correspondence from colleagues such as M F (later Sir Michael) Atiyah, M G Barratt, P J Hilton, I M James and S MacLane, sometimes extending over a period of twenty or thirty years.

Adams, John Frank (1930–1989), mathematician

Papers of Lord Adrian

  • ADRN
  • Fonds

The papers contain faculty and special lectures, academic correspondence, scientific notebooks, letters and papers as Master of Trinity and President of the Royal Society, papers relating to the Natural Sciences Club, papers relating to the Cambridge Post-Expressionist exhibition and the diaries of Hester Adrian.

Adrian, Edgar Douglas (1889–1977), 1st Baron Adrian, physiologist

Papers of Francis Aston

  • ASTN
  • Fonds
  • 1920-1942

Writings, printed material, and miscellaneous material relating to both editions of F. W. Aston's 'Isotopes' and both editions of the later revision, 'Mass-spectra and Isotopes'.

The writings include an incomplete[?] draft of the first edition of 'Isotopes' written in Aston's hand [ASTN 1], some pages written on the verso of minutes of the British Association for the Advancement of Science [ca 1920-1923], with related notes and including a postcard from Hugh Frank Newall dated Dec. 193[?] about a reference found in [Antonius] van den Broek [ASTN 1/104]; other drafts are a combination of typescript and printed material with emendations in Aston's hand and that of a typesetter, some of it written on C. P. Snow's letterhead., with original material for the plates and figures [ASTN 2, 4, 7, 8].

Accompanied by printed copies of 'Isotopes' which contain some edits and have been cut up for use in the revision [ASTN 3, 6], and a typescript letter from F. P. Dunn of Edward Arnold Publishers dated Nov. 1923 sending unbound copies of 'Isotopes' for his use [ASTN 5]. Also accompanied by offprints of other works, also with emendations and cut sections [ASTN 9], and a letter from F. A. Towle of the Royal Society in July 1927 returning figures for his Bakerian Lecture [ASTN 10].

Aston, Francis William (1877–1945), physicist

Papers of the Babington family of Rothley Temple

  • BABN
  • Fonds
  • 1788-1921

This archive includes papers (mostly correspondence) of the following. Charles Roos Babington, 1818-26; George Gisborn Babington, 1809-37; Jean Babington, 1802-40; Joseph Babington 1822-26; Matthew Babington, 1821-33; Thomas Babington, 1788-1837; Thomas Gisborne Babington, 1809-34; Colin Macaulay, 1811-35; Zachary Macaulay, 1791-1835; Sir James Parker, 1818-1857; Margaret Parker, 1820-43; Mary Lady Parker, 1806-57; Susan Darroch 1820-39; Lydia Rose 1803-44 and Mary Ellen Rose, 1836-1921.
Correspondents include Thomas Babington Macaulay, Aulay and Zachary Macaulay and Sir James Parker. The correspondence between Zachary Macaulay and Thomas Babington contains many references to the anti-slavery campaign and its champions including William Wilberforce.

Babington family of Rothley Temple

Papers of G. K. Batchelor

  • BACH
  • Fonds
  • 1940-2000

Most, if not all of Batchelor’s papers were left in his rooms at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and transferred after his death to Trinity College Library by Professor Keith Moffatt. His surviving papers reflect his wide professional interests. Section H contains manuscripts and working materials for many of his publications. Section I contains notes on various aspects of his subject which he produced throughout his career, many of which are dated. Section K contains texts of conference and special lecture that he gave (faculty lectures are to be found in section D9). Papers relating to his work at DAMTP are in section D and his copious scientific correspondence in section F

Batchelor, George Keith (1920–2000), fluid dynamicist

Papers of Clive Bell

  • BELL
  • Fonds
  • 1902–1964

Manuscript and typescript drafts of articles, lectures, correspondence and presscuttings

Bell, Arthur Clive Heward (1881–1964), art critic and writer

Papers of Edward White Benson

  • BENS
  • Fonds
  • 1848-20th cent

The archive contains diaries 1850-1896, school and university notebooks, leter notebooks on religious matters, official papers 1853-1873, correspondence, copy correspondence [1899] and various other miscellaneous items

Benson, Edward White (1829–1896), Archbishop of Canterbury

Papers of Henry Arthur Bright

  • BRIG
  • Fonds
  • c 1830-1884

The papers consist of over 2000 letters written to Henry Arthur Bright from friends, colleagues, and family members arranged in alphabetical order. Principal correspondents include Robert Brook Aspland, William Robert Brownlow, William Henry Channing, Lord Charlemont, William George Clark, Sir Reginald John Cust, Charles Milnes Gaskell, Lord Houghton (130 letters), Charles Eliot Norton, and Spencer Perceval (b 1828). There are also letters from Hungerford Crewe, and the Hawthorne family, but not Nathaniel himself: Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife Sophia, and children Una and Julian. Letters to Bright's family consist mainly of photocopies.

The last box contains a few miscellaneous items: notes, an essay on ''The Characteristic Difference between Ancient and Modern Civilization' which was awarded the English prize at Trinity College, and a bound volume containing proofs of Lord Houghton's 'Notes on "Endymion"' and Houghton's introduction to the works of Walter Savage Landor in Thomas Humphry Ward's 'The English Poets 1880-1918, Vol. IV, The Nineteenth Centry: Wordsworth to Rossetti', accompanied by a letter and a note from Lord Houghton.

Bright, Henry Arthur (1830–1884) author and merchant

Papers of C. D. Broad

  • BROD
  • Fonds
  • 1903–1971

Although there is some useful autobiographical material including diaries and family correspondence among the papers, the bulk of the material relates to Broad's working life. The detailed faculty lectures, many of which were later published, are preserved as are other lectures that Broad gave from time to time. Notes of the works of others are also among the papers, with Broad's comments, but little of Broad's own notes in preparation for his lectures and publications survive. There are also eight undated notebooks on subjects related to psychical research. Additionally, there are a few classical papers of Arthur Verrall, which Broad was presumably given due to the SPR connecrion with the family and some papers of John Chadwick on mathematical and philosophical subjects

Broad, Charlie Dunbar (1887–1971), philosopher

Papers of Robert Burn

  • BURN
  • Fonds
  • 1862–1901

The majority of the papers in this collection are flysheets (A) dealing with issues debated before the Senate, and as such form a valuable insight into subjects and opinions considered important in late nineteenth century Cambridge. Many of these, such as the accounts of various graces on compulsory Greek or reforms to the Classical Tripos, are concerned with Burn's personal academic preoccupations, but it is a measure of his versatility and dedication to the University as a whole that this collection also contains papers written by him on such questions as the plausibility of introducing degrees in Science and the necessity of widening the Cam to facilitate rowing. Also included are papers on matters of national importance, such as the University Tests Bill and the Oxford Declaration, both of which caused heated debate in the Senate and were of particular interest to Burn as a clergyman.

Another interesting feature of this collection is that the authors of many of the flysheets to be found within it are such important University figures of the last century. Jebb, Jackson and Sidgwick, amongst many others, were concerned with fighting their corner on various issues that came before the Senate, and it is through their opinions that it is possible to glimpse the origins of many events and practices (the building of the New Museums or the establishment of the Historical Tripos, to name just two) that became a reality.

The remainder of this collection consists of mark books (B) for the Classical Tripos 1862, when Burn was an examiner, and miscellaneous items (C) preserved along with the collection. The mark books are of particular importance for those interested in the history of Classics at Cambridge, as well as in its main figures: Jebb, for example, is described in a note by Burn as being better at historical prose than philosophical. Amongst the miscellanea are also items which betray the interests of Burn, but also have a much wider appeal, such as architectural plans of excavations at Rome, and accounts of lectures on Roman Art given at Rugby School.

See the attached finding aid for a more detailed description.

Burn, Robert (1829–1904), classical scholar and archaeologist

Papers of Sir James Butler (J. R. M. Butler)

  • BUTJ
  • Fonds
  • 1794–1975

Personal correspondence 1894-1974, papers concerning Trinity College and Cambridge University 1907-66, academical notes 1920-50, lectures 1921-62, publications 1914-64, papers relating to The Directorate of Military Operations 1918-19, The League of Nations 1918-32, J R M Butler's political life 1918-24, Civil Affairs Staff Centre 1943-44, Papers of George Butler 1794-1850, papers of Henry Montagu Butler 1846-1918, papers of Gordon Kerr Montagu Butler 1910-16, papers of Nevile Montagu Butler 1910-67

Butler, Sir James Ramsay Montagu (1889–1975), knight, historian

Papers of Erskine Childers

  • CHIL
  • Fonds
  • 1880–1922

The papers consist of correspondence, printed material, writings, personal papers, and photographs documenting the English life of Erskine Childers. The correspondence includes incoming letters to Erskine and to Molly Childers, copies of letters sent by Erskine, and a large number of letters written to others from others.

There are over 75 letters from Erskine to Molly dated 1903-1913; Erskine's other principal correspondents include Ian Hamilton, Field Marshal Frederick Roberts, and Basil Williams. Molly's principal correspondents include Benoît-Constant Coquelin, Kate Courtney, and John Singer Sargent. The collection includes letters from a variety of other correspondents, among them Edward Arnold, Julian Corbett, Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry James, William James, Lord Kitchener, J. Ellis McTaggart, Walter Runciman, George Bernard Shaw (to Emily Ford), and G. M. Trevelyan.

Printed material includes cuttings of reviews for 'The H.A.C. in South Africa', 'The Times History of the war in South Africa', 'War and the Arme Blanche', 'The Riddle of the Sands', and 'The German Influence on British Cavalry'; cuttings of articles on cruising printed in 'The Times' from 1907-1913; as well as two issues of 'Poblacht na hÉireann' from 21, 23 October, 1922.

The collection also includes a holograph poem apiece by Bronson Alcott and William Ellery Channing, photographs of Benoît-Constant Coquelin, and a signed photograph of Sarah Bernhardt.

Childers, Robert Erskine (1870–1922), author and politician

Papers of W. K. Clifford

  • CLIF
  • Fonds
  • 1860s–1970s

The collection includes letters written by Clifford to friends and relatives, notebooks kept by him, and various items relating to his lectures and writings, including manuscript drafts, proofs, printed syllabuses, and pamphlets. There are also some photographs. The items added after Clifford’s death include correspondence about him, obituaries, reviews of posthumous publications, and papers relating to the public testimonial organised in his name.

Clifford, William Kingdon (1845-1879), mathematician and philosopher of science

Papers of F. M. Cornford

  • CORN
  • Fonds
  • 1877–1987

The collection contains early publications, 1898-1918; notebooks and sketchbooks, 1899-[1930]; correspondence, 1877-1921; Memorials/obituaries, 1843 and papers relating to Bertrand Russell and Trinity, 1919-1986. The collection also contains papers relating to John Cornford.

Cornford, Francis Macdonald (1874–1943), classical scholar

Papers of Harold Davenport

  • DAVT
  • Fonds
  • 1911–1986

The papers consist of correspondence, school notebooks, research notes and drafts, diaries, photographs, and publications documenting most aspects of Davenport's life and work. His contributions to his subject as student, teacher, writer and researcher, are well documented and the collection as a whole is of pedagogical interest. Less fully represented are his extensive travels for visits and conferences (which can sometimes only be deduced from a jotted heading on a lecture script) and his work for the London Mathematical Society.

The 60 boxes of material are organised into seven series: Biographical and personal papers, School and university notebooks and lecture notes, Lectures and addresses, Publications, Research notes and drafts, Faculty of Mathematics, Cambridge and Correspondence.

Series A, Biographical and personal papers, includes Davenport's unpublished reminiscences and reflections on his life's work, written shortly before his death with the assistance of his wife and his colleague D. J. Lewis (A.8-10). Other documentation on his career includes, unusually, his examination scripts and marks awarded at Manchester University in 1927 preserved by his principal tutor, L. J. Mordell (A.30-31).

Series B, School and university notebooks and lecture notes, is a record of mathematical teaching at Manchester 1924-1927 (B.23-54) and Cambridge 1927-1932 (B.55-92), by means of Davenport's notes, carefully taken and preserved, of lecture courses, class work and exercises.

Series C, Lectures and addresses, is a substantial section representing Davenport's own contribution to the teaching of mathematics from the 1930s as a Research Fellow in Cambridge through his various university appointments and lectures abroad, including the lectures at Michigan, later published in book form (C.115-124). Several of these contain sets of problems and solutions, and some examination material. On a less technical note is the address given in 1947 at Accrington Grammar School, Davenport's old school (C.131). A new generation in the filiation of mathematics is represented by the notes on Davenport's lectures at London in 1946 made by C. A. Rogers, his research student, collaborator and eventual successor as Astor Professor (C.167).

Series D, Publications, includes drafts, sometimes accompanied by correspondence with collaborators (see especially D.110-120) or publishers, for Davenport's many papers. These have been linked wherever possible to the numbered list in the Bibliography appended to the Royal Society Memoir by C. A. Rogers and others (Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 17, 1971). In addition, there is considerable material relating to work not listed in the official bibliography: this includes Davenport's books, The higher arithmetic (D.89-92) and Multiplicative number theory (D.170-182), book reviews (D.208), unpublished work (D.201-203) and a posthumous publication (D.207).

Series E, Research notes and drafts, contains a variety of material: paginated narrative sequences perhaps intended for lectures or papers, notes and calculations often on problems arising from work by others, and miscellaneous shorter unidentified notes. There is in consequence some potential overlap with other series, notably C and D. Of interest is the collaborative work with Helmut Hasse arising from Davenport's period in Marburg (E.1-15). Davenport's notes of lectures and talks by others (E.103-126) include mathematicians of an older generation (K. Mahler, L. J. Mordell, C. L. Siegel), friends and contemporaries (P. Erdös, H. A. Heilbronn), and pupils and successors (B. J. Birch, J. W. S. Cassels, C. A. Rogers, K. F. Roth). Another link in the pedagogic chain is J. E. Littlewood's extended list of 'Research Problems' and Davenport's 'Comments' (E.131)

Series F, Faculty of Mathematics, Cambridge, is small but includes a little material on research, examinations and the newly-created Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

In Series G, Correspondence, Davenport's links as student, teacher and collaborator with several generations can be traced. Early correspondence with E. A. Milne (G.206) and L. J. Mordell (G.208) feature their recognition and fostering of Davenport's talent, and that with E. Bombieri (G.28-39), D. J. Lewis (G.175-184) and C. A. Rogers (G.268-278), among many others, indicate his continuing contributions. Special mention must be made of Davenport's close connection with German mathematicians, several of whom he met during his early visits to Marburg and elsewhere and whom he helped and encouraged when they were forced to emigrate: see his correspondence with H. A. Heilbronn (G.123-142), H. Kober (G.165), K. Mahler (G.194-201), and R. Rado (G.257). There is also correspondence with H. Hasse (G.116-122), who remained in Germany. Davenport's command of the language is evident both in the correspondence and in the drafts for lectures and papers elsewhere in the collection.

Davenport, Harold (1907-1969) mathematician

Papers of Maurice Dobb

  • DOBB
  • Fonds
  • 1900–1983

Personal and family papers 1900-81; correspondence 1919-1976; manuscripts of publications [1920]-78; lectures c1919-76; collected publications of others c1930-1976; material relating to the Communist Party of Great Britain 1922-76.

Dobb, Maurice Herbert (1900–1976), economist

Papers of J. D. Duff

  • DUFF
  • Fonds
  • 1888–1940

The majority of this archive consists of letters by Duff to members of his family, viz.: (A): to his wife Laura, 45 letters, 1897-1909; (B): to his son Alan, 356 letters, 1909-1933; (C): to his son Patrick, 96 letters, 1909-1934; (D): to his son James, 4 letters, 1909-1916; (E): to his daughter Hester, 8 letters, 1933-1934; (F): to his daughter Mary, 1 letter, 1911.

There are also 68 letters (G) from Laura Duff to her son Alan, 1915-1940, and three (H) to her husband J.D. Duff, relating to their son James's entrance examinations for Wellington College in 1910. J, K and L are letters written by their sons: 3 letters and a postcard from Alan Duff to his mother, 1909-1920 (J), a letter from James Duff to Alan Duff, 1911 (K), and a letter from Patrick Duff to J. F. Duff, relating to J. F. Duff winning a scholarship to Trinity in 1916 (L).

The final group of letters (M) are by various authors: one from J. D. Duff to Diana Frances Crawley, future wife of his son Alan, on the death of her father, 1933; letters to A. C. Duff from W. G. Collett (1911) and R. Moore (1913) at Wellington College; letter to J. D. Duff from G. M. Trevelyan, 1934 about Edward Fitzgerald's letters; letter to Laura Duff from the Postmaster at Cambridge, 1923, relating to a telegram from Cairo.

Miscellaneous material (N) comprises: copy of the marriage certificate of James Duff Duff and Laura Lenox-Coningham, 1895; page torn from a notebook with short phrase in Ancient Greek; memoir, "Lemnos" of an army camp, probably by A. C. Duff, with envelope addressed to J. D. Duff.

Finally there are twenty eight of J. D. Duff's pocket diaries (usually by Lett's) dating from 1888-1912, 1915-1918, 1922-1926, and 1931-1934; the earliest are kept as appointment books, with brief notes of college and social occasions, but Duff's entries later expand to be fuller records of his days, typically recording weather, reading material, pastimes and family news. A notebook with A. C. Duff's name and address at the front contains 'Extracts from F[ather's] Diary'.

Duff, James Duff (1860–1940), classicist

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