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Gicquel, Marguerite (fl 1920s) friend of R. C. Trevelyan
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Letter from Marguerite Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

1 Rue Royale, St. Cloud (S[eine] et O[ise]. - Their friend Magdeleine Greslé has asked her to write to Trevelyan to ask if he could put her in touch with a British impresario, as she has a strong desire to sing in London, but Trevelyan is the only British person she knows. Will tell Trevelyan what Magdeleine has already done in her career in case he knows an impresario who could engage her for a series of concerts, or a few connoisseurs in London who could at least make her known there. Trevelyan knows how hard life is here, and that it is not possible to earn a living singing in Paris except in the theatre, which Magdeleine does not want to do; she takes a lively interest in the British musical scene, but unfortunately does not speak English; however, Trevelyan knows she could increase his compatriots' knowledge of the French, Italian, and Spanish musical scenes, also that of the Russians before Bolshevism. Magdeleine has sung here with the Colonne, Chevillard and Pasdeloup [orchestras] and various musical societies; she has also sung in Spain and will return there, and in Portugal; she only started her career two years ago. She is considered the best performer of Debussy. Is repeating what Trevelyan knows as well as she does, but he will excuse this 'panégyrique sincère' from a friend. The request is an 'hommage' to the memory which he has left with them. Hopes Trevelyan and his family are well. Her parents send their regards.

Letter from Marguerite Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

1 Rue Royale, St. Cloud. - She and her friend [Magdeleine Greslé] thank Trevelyan for the information he has given them [on musical contacts in Britain, see 22/26], which her friend will put to use when she returns from Spain. Thinks Magdeleine's agent here, [Arthur] Dandelot, will happily get in contact with the person Trevelyan names, and Florent Schmitt or Ravel can write what they think of her. They leave on 10 January for Barcelona, then Bilbao, and she thinks Madrid at the end of the month, where Madame Greslé is giving one or two concerts; they will continue to Malaga where she is giving two concerts, and another in Madrid on the way back; is unsure of exact dates except from the concert at Barcelona, on 13 January. Knows Madame Greslé is singing Debussy's "La Damoiselle Elue", with [Fernandez] Arbos, but does not know where since the Spanish impresario is a fool, and 'one learns the news when one arrives in the cities [where the concerts are due to be]'. They received Trevelyan's letter of introduction to his friends 'with joy', but do not know if they will be able to profit from it. Thanks him for everything.

Postcard from Marguerite Gicquel and Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

St. Cloud. - Had been sorry about Trevelyan's speedy departure, because it prevented her seeing him again [beforehand]; was glad to get his message on Saturday morning. Thanks him for coming to the office: always gives her great pleasure to shake his hand, and she is pleased to count herself among those whom he does not forget. Her family were glad he remembered them.

Félix Gicquel's message is written on the front of the postcard, above and below the illustration: he will go eagerly to hear the Hungarian violinist [Jelly d'Arányi or her sister Adila?]. Hopes Trevelyan found his wife and son well. Will be very pleased to see [Francis] Birrell again, as long as Birrell's pipe does not keep him in 'some bad place' at the time he had arranged with Félix.

Postcard from Marguerite Gicquel and Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

Postmarked Saint-Cloud. - Marguerite was sorry not to see Trevelyan yesterday at the [Comédie-] Française: he would have enjoyed like them a 'marvellous' evening; hopes it will be put on again. Gives the address of their friend Madame [Germaine] Beaumont: 139 Rue Ordener, Paris, who will certainly be delighted to make translations from English, especially since it was Trevelyan who put her in touch with his friend Jaloux.

Félix Gicquel's message is written on the front of the postcard, beside the illustration: it was his sister who kept to the idea of giving Trevelyan the address of Madame Beaumont, whose mother was Annie de Pène.

Letter from Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

St Cloud. - Madame Greslé will be at home on Thursday, and will see Trevelyan with pleasure. Will meet Trevelyan and Geoffrey [Hardern] at five o'clock at the Palais-Royal metro station the evening of "Plus ça change" [revue by Rip]; they will go directly from home to their lovely friend's house. Was delighted to meet [Francis] Birrell. 'Here is the next peace!'. Wants to see Trevelyan 'again and again', so that when the Channel is between them once more, their friendship will be as strong as if there were no distance. His sister [Marguerite] will also be very happy to get to know Trevelyan, and will be at her friend [Madame Greslé]'s house. Adds a postscript with Madame Greslé's address in case by some accident he is unable to meet them and take them there.

Letter card from Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

St Cloud, 1 Rue Royale; addressed to Trevelyan at the Mission Anglo-Americaine, 53 rue de Rivoli, Paris. - Much enjoyed his evening with Trevelyan last night at the Théâtre Michel. His sister's friend [Magdeleine Greslé] is not singing on Sunday, as the conductor, M. Pierné, is ill; her appearance has been re-arranged for Sunday 10 November. Gicquel will wait for that day to go to the Salle Gaveau; asks Trevelyan to forgive him for not following up on that idea. Would like to go to Versailles on Sunday, and had touched on the plan with Geoffrey [Hardern]; asks if Trevelyan would like to come.

Letter from Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

Received a card from Geoffrey [Hardern] yesterday evening, sent from London and informing him of his arrival in Paris yesterday - Monday - at one; naturally could not see him then, but has sent him a message this morning at rue de Rivoli, and is waiting to see him now with great pleasure. Asks how Trevelyan and [Francis] Birrell are, what happened at five o' clock on Saturday, when they will next talk, and go to visit Madame Beaumont. Is waiting for Trevelyan to let him know when he has an evening free. His sister saw Trevelyan at the Yvonne Astruc concert, but was unable to speak to him.

Letter from Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

St Cloud. - Thanks to the workers, who have brought them this holiday [the first May Day], he can write to Trevelyan. Has just looked out of the window: all the shops, cafés and businesses are shut; there are a few walkers despite the rain, who seem 'astonished... by this extraordinary rest'. Does not know what is happening in Paris: everything is calm here, but perhaps things are more disturbed in Place de la Concorde; will know tomorrow, as there are no newspapers today, [in an article appearing] between two related stories: one about the financiers in London, the other about the dinner of Count Brockdorff-Rantzau the [German] ambassador.

Feels as if he is talking to Trevelyan, despite the time and distance between them: has continued to think often and sympathetically about him, and is very glad to have met him in Paris due to a 'romantic idea of Geoffrey' [Hardern]: is also grateful for the friendship of that young man, who made a surprise visit to them last Sunday, He is at Dole, with his fiancée, and promised to visit when he returns. Gicquel's sister, with whom he often talks about Trevelyan, greatly appreciated Geoffrey's 'beautiful nature', and was also pleased to see him again. She and their parents send warm regards to Trevelyan. Madame [Magdeleine] Greslé is in Lisbon: her journey to Spain and Portugal was 'very rudimentary' in terms of comfort, and she wrote to Marguerite Gicquel that she found herself very far away and almost lost: hopes she does not flee [?] into a 'new revolution'.

Trevelyan is back as head of the family after his long months away: Gicquel greatly appreciates the work he has accomplished and the role he has played during the war, and his services as well as those his friends are still rendering are invaluable. Trevelyan can now live happily, proud of the labour he has accomplished, with his wife and child among all his books in his beautiful countryside. Sends all his best wishes to Madame Trevelyan. Counts on seeing the likeable [Francis] Birrell soon; he must be about to return [to France]. If Trevelyan sees him before his departure, asks him to let him know how pleased Gicquel will be to see him again in Paris; also asks Trevelyan to write when he has a moment.

Letter from Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

Eight days ago he and his sister went to the 'marvellous concert' Trevelyan had so kindly directed them towards: thanks him again for giving them such pleasure, of such high quality. If he had known Trevelyan's friends the performers [Adila Fachiri and Jelly d'Arányi] before the concert, he would have appreciated their 'rare qualities' even more. The elder [Adila] has a very human style of playing; one senses she is an 'ardent, passionate woman, a "panther"'. Her sister [Jelly] is a young girl with a 'seraphic' style of playing; 'an angel of the order of "Powers"'. Madame Fachiri performed the Bach "Chaconne" with a 'prodigious' sustainment and balance, while Mademoiselle d'Arányi played Mozart's serenade very well. Loved their performance of the Bach sonata together, while an adagio brought him to tears. The second part of the concert allowed the artists to 'showcase all their delightful sounds', but the music descended from the 'elevated spheres' of Mozart and Bach. He and his sister went to the foyer afterwards to greet the performers, who welcomed them enthusiastically:Trevelyan's name was a 'precious key' which opened wide the door. Went the next day to Princess Bibesco's to pay his respects to Jelly and her mother. Their kind welcome touched him greatly, and he had the 'boldness' to ask if he could escort them to the theatre one evening; therefore had the great pleasure of taking them to the Nouveautés to see "Chouchou poids plume"; unfortunately Marguerite was unable to come. Promised them that he would come to England at last next year in June and July; hopes that the pound [exchange rate] will allow the journey then, as today the difficulties are 'insurmountable'. It is four o'clock, so Trevelyan's friends will be arriving now at London; they were dreading the journey so he hopes the crossing was not too hard. Asks Trevelyan to pass on his admiration and friendship when he sees them next. Will have the pleasure of spending the evening with Fr[ancis] Birrell next Monday; Birrell came to see him the other day when they arranged the evening, and Gicquel found him in good form if a little skinny; he is always full of spirit and charming.

Postcard from Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

Sent to Trevelyan at the Shiffolds, forwarded to him c/o Mr Hunt, 18 Dorset Square, Baker St, W. - Has come to this province for the first time and it is very interesting for its character, customs, language, history, sea, mountains and inhabitants; everything is joyful and lively like the sun. They play Basque pelota, which is a pastime of elegance and the players are marvellous to see; they dance the fandango, which is very picturesque when performed in the public square of a little village. Is holidaying with his sister and Magde Greslé, staying with Magde's mother. All best wishes to Trevelyan, his wife, and child.

Postcard from Félix Gicquel to R. C. Trevelyan

St Cloud. - Trevelyan is very kind to send a ticket for the 'Salle des Agriculteurs' in Paris: he and his sister will be very happy to go and cheer Trevelyan's friends, of great artistic renown, [Adila Fachiri and Jelly d'Arányi], though Madame Greslé is still in the south of France. Will write after the concert to let him know how it went. His sister is going to sing in Valenciennes and Denain this week. Adds a postscript to say that the postcard shows the house of friends, where he has come on holiday.