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Davies, Crompton Llewelyn (1868-1935) lawyer and civil servant
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Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Bob is settled with a coach, and that Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies is getting on well with Elliott. George shot some rabbits while out ferretting, and enjoyed a battle [of toy soldiers] 'between William the IIIrd and the French very much', though he had no time to help him as he will be very busy until the 'great event' [the general election]. Had a good meeting at Rothbury, and Rossendale will send them on their 'London crusade in high spirits'; hopes they will 'do some good'. He and Caroline are finishing reading Keats's letters aloud; likes to have the poetry interspersed. Lady Frederic Cavendish is staying, and is 'very pleasant'. Signs off by calling Bob 'dear boy', as 'the convict used to call Pip' [in Dickens's "Great Expectations"].

Notebook with loose draft verse, some letters, and proofs

Book contains: notes from the "Law Quarterly", 1885 [1v-4r]; verse play with characters including Godfrey of Bouillon [5v-17r]. It has also been used from back to front, turned 180 degrees, for: strophe, antistrophe and epode of a poem about Dionysus and the Tyrrhenian pirates [v of endpaper-88r]; poem about Tobit [85r-81r; 79r-77v; 1 loose f between 82 and 83].

Also 73 inserts (both single sheets and bifolia), mostly of handwritten drafts of poetry. These include:
page proofs of "Trojan Captives Grinding Corn In The Palace of Menelaus", which appeared in "Mallow and Aspohodel" as "Quern Songs" [28/1/11];
draft verse and sketch plan on headed notepaper from Hôtel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello [28/1/27]; draft verse using headed notepaper from Wallington [28/1/28, 28.1/35, 28/1/38, 28/1/42];
letter, 29 July 1898, from 'W. E.' [William Edward?], Macmillan & Co. Ltd, St. Martin's Street, London, W.C., to R. C. Trevelyan, Roundhurst, Haslemere, acknowledging receipt of Trevelyan's letter of the 19th, the proofs of his poems ["Mallow and Asphodel"], which will be sent to press today, and Trevelyan's second letter with corrections that will be attended to [28/1/31];
Latin text of "Sylvae. III. Ambra" by Agnolo [Ambrogini] Poliziano [or Politian]; this may not be in Trevelyan's hand, though the pencil translation on the back is. [28/1/44]
Page proof of "Prologue for Bacchus", with stamp 'R. & R. Clark. Printers', with annotations in pencil at bottom and on verso [28/1/45].
Letter, 4 Apr 1900, from G. E. Moore, Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall, to R. C. Trevelyan. - Hopes that Bob will come some time next week; Crompton [Llewelyn Davies] will arrive on the 13th or 14th; gives corrected instructions for Bob's journey. Verso of letter, along with another bifolium, with draft verses, "Roses opening on the morn..." [28/1/55-57].

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Not surprised that the Apostles are considering whether they should 'take notice of JECW' [James Edward Cowell Weldon, who had cancelled the annual dinner with little warning], but expects there is 'something to be said on both sides'. Is interested in both [Crompton and Theodore Llewelyn] Davies, and hopes they will both get fellowships next year; supposes postponement is 'not as bad a thing' as it was in his time. Glad that George is doing so well. Is rather busy; has never seen less game around the lower estate, but does well without it.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Union Society, Cambridge. - Spent all day yesterday [the beginning of term?] 'seeing people and getting [his] pictures and books in'. Has put Bob's books, 'mostly school classics', in the gyp room. Likes his rooms very much: the two places he is 'fondest of in the world are the old court and the cloisters'. [Maurice] Amos is in [Bertrand] Russell's rooms, [George] Gooch the rooms opposite Collins's, and [Henry Graham] Dakyns in the 'tower by the carriage entrance'; these are 'historical stairs', since Horace Walpole visited a friend in Dakyns' new rooms. MacT[aggart]'s lectures will be attended by 'Amos, Gooch, a lady, and Dickinson and Wedd probably'. Has acquired two statuettes of Assyrian kings, copied from originals in the British Museum, which he thinks are 'very fine' and 'almost as original' as Bob's 'Hindoo god was'. Came by the late train, so had no evening in London to go to the theatre. Amos has heart trouble, 'having overworked himself', and may even be unfit to study this year: MacT[aggart] says he is well ahead with his reading and could do his tripos with not much more work if the worst came; his mother is here and George took tea with her and Maurice yesterday. Asks if Bob has any 'gossip or scandal' from [Harrow] Founder's Day. Notes in a postscript that the 'two fellows who live opposite you [ie Theodore and Crompton Llewelyn Davies]' were here recently 'both in great force', Theodore bathed 'on a raw morning with Moore as usual'.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Grimsby Farm, Long Lane, Coldash, Newbury. - Hopes Trevy has received the letter he wrote to Naples, otherwise he will think Marsh 'rather a beast'. Glad Corpo di Cava was not snowed under, since it has turned out to be 'so delightful'; he himself would have 'preferred Capri for the sake of Tiberius' [see 15/318]. Has just got away from London and finished his first day of work here; his 'flesh crept to such a degree' when he woke on Monday night and started to think about his tripos [examinations] that it 'must have moved on about an inch all round'. Stayed in London a little longer than he should have done because of a 'superior French company' who performed [Ibsen's] "Rosmersholm" and "Master Builder" and a play by Maeterlinck under the direction of M. [Aurélien-François-Marie] Lugné -Poé who 'seems to be a descendant of Edgar Poe'. He is 'a very beautiful man with a pale face & black hair', and reminds Marsh of a 'portrait of some poet', perhaps Poe himself; he 'acts very respectably' and played the Master Builder as 'an American with a straggling beard & a drunken complexion' and 'quite revolutionized' Marsh's idea of the part, since 'the rather vulgar arrogant manner he put on in certain parts' made the character seem more consistent than 'the suavity of Lewis Waller'. Asks if Trevy has ever read Maeterlinck, as it is 'useless to try and explain what he's like' if not; in the 'mixture of great simplicity with an entire rejection of realism' he thinks it goes back to 'the Burne Jones & Morris kind of thing'. Sat next to William Archer, who was 'very nice' to him. Saw many friends at the Ibsen plays: [Erskine] Childers, Crompton [Llewelyn Davies], Gerald Duckworth, J[ohn] Waldegrave, 'the Babe' [William Haynes Smith?] etc. Thinks the Independent Theatre must be 'the worst managed concern in the world': the performances usually begin late 'after the curtain has gone up two or three times, to encourage the audience. You're never safe from the irruption of a cat in the most moving scenes', the actors miss their cues, or the curtain does not go down at the end of the act. The man who is called the Acting Manager [Charles Hoppe] is 'the greatest crook [he] ever met with in a responsible position', who seems unable to sell tickets without asking for assistance and did not even know how many acts there were in "Rosmersholm". Marsh took the Verralls to that play; comments on Arthur Verrall's reaction to theatre: 'he never is, or lays himself out to be, in the least moved by a play' but responds to 'the cleverness or stupidity with which it is written'.

Very glad that George [Trevelyan] got his scholarship, though there was no doubt he and Buxton would; 'very hard luck on [Ralph] Wedgwood. Went to see [Charles] Sanger yesterday in his new rooms at Hare Court. No-one has heard 'anything of [Bertrand] Russell for some time'. Only saw Oswald [Sickert], who had influenza, not serious, once; he has just got 'free from the Werner Company, which has used up the Beauties of Britain, & gone on to Paris [ie, finished publishing "Beautiful Britain]'; hopes he will have time for his novel now. [Maurice] Baring took Marsh to supper with Edmund Gosse on Sunday: a 'most amusing man', whose conversation is 'described in Stevenson's essay on conversation ["Talk and Talkers"] under the name of Purcell. He was in the teakettle mood'. Met [Henry] Harland, the editor of the "Yellow Book" there; thought him 'an awful little man', but 'on getting accustomed to his manner' next day he thought him 'like-able on the whole'. Hopes to go to supper next Sunday with 'the even more distinguished [Robert] Bridges', though he has not read his recent works so 'feels rather ill-equipped'. Met John Davidson briefly recently; he 'seemed a genial and light hearted little man, with a nice Scotch accent'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St. - Bob's 'old woman' [housekeeper] told him when he returned [from Italy?] that a 'young man in a cab with a portmanteau' called when he was away; seems that Edward 'appeared at no 14 [home of Crompton and Theodore Llewelyn Davies] hunting for a lunch'; hopes he found 'a friend or restaurant in time' as he knows his friend needs 'constant supplies... to stave off dissolution', like moles which cannot go without worms for more than twelve hors. Went round to Bruton Street yesterday, but found that Edward had gone back on Sunday; this means he missed meeting 'a rose of Shiraz, the direct descendant of the one which intoxicated Hafiz... You would have had this rose, had you been here' but instead Bob 'took it round to [Roger] Fry, who fell violently in love with it, and fell to painting it' [this appears to refer to the first meeting between Fry and his future wife Helen Coombe]. Supposes Edward is caught up in 'the last act' of his academical careers [final exams]; he should not be 'despondent and doubtful'. Tells Edward to excuse his 'sermons', but not his spelling, as he swears 'never to look at or correct' a letter to him again, 'after the outrageous fables' Edward circulated about his 'beautiful and chaste letters from Italy'.

Postcard from Crompton Llewelyn Davies to R. C. Trevelyan

London; addressed to Trevelyan at Copse Cottage, Fernhurst, near Haslemere. - Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and for sending the Browning volumes: he had 'rather hankered' after "Paracelsus". Had less luck with the 'Cambridge Pictures', but feels his way of taking them might have spoiled Trevelyan's fun. He did meet and befriend Edward Carpenter at Cambridge, however.

Letter from Crompton Llewelyn Davies to R. C. Trevelyan

14 Barton St. - Is anxious to hear whether Trevelyan has secured the Swan at Fittleworth, and whether there will be room for the whole party (see also 2/32 and 2/34). As well as the names mentioned by Trevelyan, Henry Dakyns will come, and Sanger is encouraging Dakyns' father and [brother] Arthur to come; Sanger has also encouraged Davies to invite Whitehead, and North [Whitehead] may come too. Davies has invited Vaughan Williams to join them as well.

Letter from Crompton Llewelyn Davies to R. C. Trevelyan

14 Barton St. - Trevelyan has done splendidly [to secure the Swan at Fittleworth: see 2/32 and 2/33]. Hopes he has not done wrong in inviting others. Asks if there will be enough room to put up Dakyns (father and son), Whitehead (father and son) and Vaughan Williams. Will be at the Mill House, Grantchester, from Saturday, so Trevelyan should send further correspondence there.

Letter from Crompton Llewelyn Davies to R. C. Trevelyan

The Mill House, Grantchester, Cambridge. - Arrangements for a gathering [at the Swan at Fittleworth, Sussex, see 2/33 and 2/34] over Easter. [Robin] Mayor is named twice in Trevelyan's list; he should also include Henry Dakyns, Alfred Whitehead and North [Whitehead]. Should think by Wednesday there will be room for 'V.W.' [Vaughan Williams], and room for 'Dakyns pere' and Arthur [Dakyns] at any time. The back of the paper seems to show drinks consumed: Norton and Strachey appear as well as names mentioned in the letter.

Letter from Crompton Llewelyn Davies to R. C. Trevelyan

14, Barton Street, Westminster. - Thanks Bob for his letter; replies by quoting four lines of poetry [the last lines of Browning's "By the Fire-Side"]; his 'heart is still very full' with thoughts of Bob. Bob knows the 'wretched mood' in which Crompton 'could have said vile things about the Dutch', and will 'understand and forgive'. Crompton is 'ashamed to think' how much he has 'trespassed' on Bob's goodness and put his 'sympathy to the strain', but this is because 'the heart opens & the "true self" often reveals itself in all its beastliness & baseness' to Bob more than to most people, as he is 'kind & patient & αἰσθητός [perceptive]'. Therefore knows that 'she in whom your hope has found its gracious soul... [refers to Elizabeth by quoting from Rossetti's "Love-Lily"]... is worthy' and 'blest' in knowing Bob. Says that Bob makes 'the world a better place' by letting them share in his happiness.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Discusses post times. The weather has been 'absolutely beastly' and he has a cold, which gave him a nose-bleed this morning. Took a day off yesterday and lunched with the Frys; [Roger] Fry is very busy, having had to give an extra lecture last week, so Bob conveys his advice on house decoration. Need good painters, as [George?] Moore had trouble when he was having his Cambridge rooms done, due to the 'stupidity of the workmen'. Gives his aunt Meg Price's address. Thinks he is becoming 'more romantic' about her; wishes he had been with her to 'caress... and explain away [his] last cruel letter' in which he thoughtlessly exaggerated his 'regret at [his] fading days of singleness' [9/119]. She will certainly not come between him and his friends, as she has 'quite enough of their own intellectual qualities to be their friend in the same way' he is. Has usually gone abroad alone and not allowed his 'sensations to be interfered with by those of others'; will probably enjoy going to Greece more with her than with 'people like Daniel and Mayor'. Attempts to explain his feelings in detail. Will be able to talk freely to his friends after his marriage, though 'it is true that men do talk more obscenely, and more blasphemously, than they ever quite dare to talk before women' and he thinks that this difference is right. Should not have written 'so carelessly' and caused her pain. Has written to her uncle saying he and she should fix the date. Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies came for tea last Sunday; he is probably going to the Lizard at Easter; he said his brother [Arthur?] and his wife went to Land's End for his honeymoon which was 'very satisfactory', but that Savernake near Salisbury plain was the 'best place conceivable', with 'every kind of scenery' only an hour from London. He says it has a good inn; Bob may look on his way to Cornwall. Seatoller [in Borrowdale] is very nice too, but much further away. Has not yet heard from Daniel how Sanger is; will tell Bessie [about Sanger's unhappy love affair] when he sees her; she guessed correctly that the woman was Dora. He and Fry still think it would have been best for them to marry, but that now seems unlikely; her treatment of him is 'not through heartlessness exactly... but owing to circumstances, and also to her rather unusual temperament'. Has done some work, and has been re-reading Flaubert's letters; feels more in sympathy with him than any other modern writer. His mother says Charles and George are thinking of giving Bessie a 'very pretty sort of box to keep music in'; wishes they would give them the flying trunk or carpet Bessie mentioned. They will have to content themselves with meeting in dreams, though it seems [Empedocle] Gaglio has a dream-carpet which will take him into Bessie's brain; still, he does not have a lock of her hair so Bob has a start.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinse[gracht], the Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Hopes Bob enjoys his week in Cornwall; asks if Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies is going too. Is very sorry to hear about Mrs [Helen] Fry's illness; even a slight attack of pleurisy is serious, and it shows how weak she is, at least about the lungs; the amount she smokes cannot be good for her. Thinks the measurements of the box for music [see 9/42] are quite right; asks if the partitions could be taken out to give more room. Will write to thank George and Charles [Trevelyan]. Went to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture about the evolution of the eye last night, 'interesting but hard to follow'. Will talk to her uncle this evening about the wedding since the answer from [Thomas?] Barclay, the Paris lawyer, has come at last; it seems the consul must be present; has had 'another wretched discussion' with her uncle about whether the consul should be invited to the wedding breakfast, which she does not want; her aunt has now talked her uncle round in secret. Has been reading an article in the "Revue de Paris" on 'Flaubert et l'Afrique'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Likes the sketch of Bessie's wedding costume; quite Watteau-esque as she says. He is 'no judge of silks' but the piece she sends looks good; encloses samples of cloth for his trousers and for a tweed suit and asks her opinion. Will probably stay in Cornwall till next Wednesday; [George] Moore and MacCarthy are the only others there at the moment; [G.H.?] Hardy left yesterday, and he hopes both 'Llewelyn Davieses' [Crompton and Theodore?] are coming tomorrow. Describes the place; Moore 'played a lot and sang yesterday after tea', then they played cards and talked. Is reading James's "Daisy Miller", which is 'charming'. Discussion of the music box; has written to his mother to suggest having the partitions taken out; it is from both George and Charles. Expects it would be best to invite the consul [Henry Turing, at Rotterdam, to the wedding celebration]; he may not come. Did not mean that Sir Henry [Howard] would arrange all the legal marriage business, but he offered to arrange the ceremony and invitation of the consul; expects he could do this most easily but it would not matter if they or her uncle should arrange it. Will write to Sir Henry or Turing when he hears from her uncle, though is not sure what to say. Would prefer to invite Sir Henry to the wedding, especially as Bob's father and mother are coming, feels he should ask his parents what they think. Sir Henry is a relation, and has 'shown great good-will and readiness'.

Does not see why Bessie should cut herself off completely from her Dutch musical friends; she will 'often be in Holland', and will 'surely stay at Mein's [sic: Mien Rontgen's] in Amsterdam'; in England, she will of course have 'complete freedom to make her own friends' and must keep up and develop her own talents as much as she can; he will enjoy hearing her play, but also going to hear others and getting to know her friends, but that does not mean she should not have independence of interests and friendships. Thinks that women 'have not enough respect for their own intellectual lives' and give it up too easily on marriage, through their husband's fault or their own; she should 'quite seriously consider going to settle in Berlin for 5 or 6 months' for her music. Mrs [Helen] Fry's marriage has made her more of a painter. Her pleurisy is better now; thinks Bessie exaggerates the importance of her cigarette smoking, and that any ill effects it does have are balanced by the help it gives her to create art. Has never 'been in danger of being in love' with Helen Fry, but always found her 'more interesting and amusing than any woman [he] ever met... with a completely original personality', and would not think of criticising such a person's habits but would assume they are 'best suited to their temperament'; in the same way, Moore probably 'drinks more whisky than is good for his health, and smokes too much too', but he would not criticise him. Bessie is also 'an original person' with a 'personal genius of [her] own', but in addition he loves her; has never felt the same about any other woman.

Continues the letter next day. Has finished "Daisy Miller"; and is doing some German, getting on better than he thought he would. Part of the reason for saying he would 'never learn German' was an 'exaggerated idea of the difficulty', but more because he thought, and still thinks, it will be less of a 'literary education' than other languages; is chiefly learning it for Goethe, though being able to read German scholarship will be useful. Has read Coleridge's translation of "Wallenstein", which Schiller himself claimed was as good as the original; thinks English and [Ancient] Greek lyric poetry is better than the German he has read. Very sorry about Lula [Julius Röntgen]; asks if it [his illness] will do more than postpone him going to Berlin. Has heard from Daniel that Sanger is 'getting on quite well'; hopes he will return from Greece 'quite himself again'. Will be nice for Bessie to see the Joneses [Herbert and Alice] again; he has 'become a little parsonic perhaps' but very nice; has seen little of him for the last few years. Bessie should certainly get [Stevenson's] "Suicide Club" for Jan [Hubrecht]; will pay half towards it. Will certainly come before Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] returns. Has grown 'such a beard, finer than Moore's and McCarthy's, though they have grown their's for weeks'. Describes their daily routine. Is encouraged that Moore likes several recent poems he himself was doubtful about; is copying out the play and will show him today or tomorrow. The Davieses are coming this afternoon. Signs off with a doggerel verse.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Rounton Grange, Northallerton. - Apologises for writing in such haste; must 'share grief' with Bob [on the death of Theodore Llewelyn Davies]. He and Charles went to K[irkby] Lonsdale yesterday, 'uninvited but welcome'. The funeral, to which no one but the family were invited, was over. The grave is next to his mother's, 'opposite the Rectory, in full sight of the windows'. Desmond MacCarthy was there 'looking after Crompton who is very broken, his physical weakness becoming apparent, not any mental or spiritual'. He himself is not finding Theodore's loss any easier, and it seems greater 'the more one thinks... both to us all and to the world. He was so much the best of us all', as well as one of the ablest, certainly easily the ablest in the 'political world'. He and Jan are coming South tomorrow; they will stay at Stocks until 6 [August], then London for the rest of the month. Must see Bob, and will come down if Bob can put him up, or is not coming to London. Sends love to Bessie, who he knows 'shares our love and grief for him'; Theodore often used to talk to him about her, and was very fond of her, 'as he was of much more unworthy people like me your brother'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - [The death of Theodore Llewelyn Davies] is 'indeed the most tragic event', and his family, friends and country will all miss him; he was 'one of the ablest & most useful of men'. Can tell her nothing more than the 'scraps' appearing in the newspapers: that he 'went out on Tuesday & was found drowned in the stream on Friday'. [Ralph?] Wedgwood wrote to Janet saying that the funeral was on Friday; none of his friends could have been there as it was so soon. George feels it 'most terribly'; Caroline is sure Bob will also miss him, and he is a 'great loss to Charles, as he was of the greatest help to him'. Everyone is thinking of [his brother] Crompton. She and Sir George feel it very much: Theodore 'seemed in a way to belong to the family' and he had great hopes of what he would do when the Liberals came to government. Hoping Charles and Mary will come for a couple of nights while their servants settle at Cambo; Charles may see Crompton before he comes and hear more, but 'there is evidently nothing to be found out'. Janet and the baby leave today. Is trying to discover whether the Carr Bosanquets are in the north, and will invite them if possible.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

1, Garden Court, Temple, E. C. - Originally enclosing [Warre?] Cornish's article; asks Bob to acknowledge receipt if he does not send it back at once; if Bob could give his opinion this might help them [the editors of the "Independent Review?"] to form their judgment. Sends love to Bessie. Postscript on back of the letter informs Bob that Crompton [Llewelyn Davies] has gone to France with [Bertrand] Russell; he seemed 'much better [emphasized] before he left' [referring to Crompton having recently lost his brother Theodore]. The Sangers are expecting the birth of a baby in around October.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Beautiful weather; they have always taken their tea outside and sometimes gone for a walk after dinner. They were very sorry to hear about Arthur [Llewelyn] Davies; [his diagnosis with cancer] is a 'sad blow' for his brother and sister and Sir George is 'much grieved' for Arthur himself. Was worth missing the dentist to have seen the Lancaster Churchmen. Glad the [Apostles'?] Dinner has 'got back to Richmond'; 'So old an institution should be kept up in all its parts'; was told recently that the Society had 'come to an end at the University'. He and Caroline are driving out to Broadway, seventeen miles away, today; on Thursday they entertain the Corporation [of Stratford on Avon] and 'people in any public position' and are expecting a hundred and sixty guests. Likes thinking of Robert and Elizabeth in 'that beautiful eyrie' [The Shiffolds]. Notes in a postscript that their guests were 'astonished' by the beauty at Welcombe, 'as they always are'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Withers has gone to see Philipson today [regarding the legacy left to Bob and George in the will of Florence Cacciola Trevelyan]. Received a letter from Sir George, enclosing some old letters, too late to show Withers before he left; they were sent to George not Bob only as he is in London so nearer the lawyers. Will send on Sir George's letter soon; Withers and Crompton [Llewelyn Davies] will let Bob know the 'contents of the enclosures'. Saw Crompton this afternoon; he has the papers, and 'has the whole affair in train'; will be in touch once the significance of the will of Mrs Cacciola's mother, Mrs [Catherine] Trevelyan, is understood.

Regarding Welcombe, George encloses a statement [no longer present] drawn up by Crompton, which Bob can keep. 'Re the last sentence in the letter, [George] told Crompton to get a copy made at Somerset House' so that Caroline need not be disturbed again. Bob can discuss this with Crompton when he is next in town.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Has sent Withers's letter to Robert on to George; sorry about the trouble Robert and Elizabeth are having [over Florence Trevelyan's will]; luckily Sir George and Caroline have plenty [of money] of their own, which will 'all be for [their] sons and daughters'. Discusses a letter he has had from Philipson; does not know the value of the land at Taormina and imagines Robert may incline towards not acting as executor, not paying the sixty thousand francs, and renouncing the property; Withers and Davies are 'wise advisers'. Glad that he himself refused to be a Trustee, which none of the family ought to be 'on any account'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Marked 'Private and Confidential'. Interested to hear about Paul, and 'about the reading room and clericalism'. Wants to write 'a few lines, between which' Robert and Elizabeth may read; has seen Crompton Davies who was 'much alive' to his suggestions, and will communicate them to Withers, that [Florence Trevelyan's] will should be proved and amount and whereabouts of the personal property ascertained. Asks Robert to find out whether Withers is working on this, and who the Trustees now are. Does not understand about the twenty thousand lire; perhaps however information has by now been given to Withers about the property in which Robert and George have an interest. Notes in a postscript that he has had three letters from the Poet Laureate [Alfred Austin], who 'sounds a jolly old chap'; also asks whether Robert knew that the Callias whose 'fine fragments' appear in Bergk ["Poetae Lyrici Graeci"] was the 'coryphoeus of the thirty tyrants [of Athens in the last days of the Peloponnesian War]'; there is an 'evident allusion' to his lines on the cottabus in the story of the death of Theramenes, but Sir George has never seen this mentioned.

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