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Fry, Helen (1864-1937) artist
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Draft or copy letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan to Virginia Woolf

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Bob thought Virginia might like to have 'some additional memories of Helen Fry' [to help with the writing of the biography of Roger Fry], since she perhaps saw her 'from a slightly different angle'. Saw a 'great deal' of Helen when the Frys' children were born and they lived in Dorking, while the Trevelyans were 'two miles away at Westcott'. She was friendly, but they 'never became intimate then', and Bessie 'always felt slightly in awe of her mysterious aloofness'. Their relationship 'suddenly seemed to change when the return of her illness approached', when Helen 'began to talk more intimately about the children', one day visiting Bessie 'to talk about her fear that the doctor and other people would think she was not a good enough mother to the children or wife to Roger'; believes 'this anxiety was a constant trouble'. Saw her 'more rarely' when they moved to London and Guildford. The Frys stayed at the Shiffolds when 'Roger had been disappointed about the post in America [atthe Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]'; was clear Helen 'took this morbidly to heart', and seemed to Bessie to think 'she herself had been at fault'. Even when their relationship was 'more easy and confidential', Bessie 'still felt her charm as aloof and mysterious'. Goldie Dickinson used to talk about Helen to Bessie 'years afterward', and though he was 'perhaps, their closest friend' and Helen had been 'very fond of him', he always felt Helen 'so mysterious' and wondered 'what she really thought and felt'.

Incomplete draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Virginia Woolf

His friendship with Roger Fry [presumably written to aid Virginia with her 'Life' of Fry; see also 17/85 and 17/97] in the days when they lived together at 29 Beaufort St between April or May 1895 and the autumn of 1896, when Roger married and Bob moved to Haslemere. Saw little of him before then, and 'knew next to nothing of art and artists', but 'no one could have been kinder in the way he introduced [Bob] to his world', or 'more patient of [Bob's] ignorance'. He was often busy with Extension Lectures on Italian art, and as illustration had 'already collected a great number of photographs' which was much harder then; thinks he had already succeeded D. S. MacColl as the "Athenaeum" magazine's art critic ; he did not therefore have as much time as he wished for painting, but 'worked very rapidly' when he could. He was painting 'several of his best early landscapes' and a few 'perhaps not very successful portraits'. One was of Mrs Widdrington, the 'sister [sic: actually mother] of Sir Edward Grey's wife [Frances]', who was a 'great friend' of Roger's and the mother of Ida Widdrington; Roger had been 'very much in love' with Ida not long before, but 'perhaps wisely, she would not marry him. She was a very vital and amusing girl, who loved hunting, farming and acting' and she and her mother remained friends with Roger for years. After that Roger 'had fallen very much in love, and none too happily, with Kate Kinsella (now Kate Presbitero)'; Bob thinks she 'treated him rather cruelly, not wanting to give him up altogether, and luring him back to her from time to time'. 'Fortunately (or perhaps in the end unfortunately) [because of her mental health' he got to know Helen Coombe while he was living with Bob, and they fell in love with each other. Roger's parents 'strongly disapproved of his becoming an artist' - he told Bob that they had offered him a hundred pounds extra a year 'if he would promise never to paint from the nude', which he 'naturally refused' - and this made him fear they would not be pleased by his choice of wife, so he told them nothing about Helen 'for a long time...' [the rest of the draft is missing].

Letter from Arnold Dolmetsch to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Boveney, nr Windsor. - Should have answered her 'kind letter' before, but has been very busy. Had the 'public examination' yesterday in the Bankruptcy Court, which went as well as possible; the trustee advised him to apply for his discharge at once saying he would not oppose it. He therefore hopes to be 'out of all this trouble' soon. Thinks her idea of having lessons on the clavichord 'excellent'; sure she would do well and 'become very fond of the instrument'; it would also be 'very convenient' for the Dolmetschs as the Frys also want to continue their lessons. His wife likes the idea and will write tomorrow suggesting a day. Has not yet made the clavichord key, but will do soon.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Thinks Bob cannot be 'in love a bit' - he is 'so disgustingly reasonable'; why is he thinking about 'acting wisely' when he should be feeling that he does not 'care a damn whether [he is] or not'. George has only seen [Elizabeth] once, and still gave him a 'much more favourable description' than Bob had managed with his '"tolerably accomplished for a young lady" and all that sort of thing'. Cannot ever remember being really pleased before that one of his friends was going to be married; hopes it will make Bob 'work properly which will be a splendid thing'. Asks him to send 'accurate details as to intellect & views of life of Miss van [der] Hoeven'. Expects it's 'still a secret'; announced it at the [Apostles] Society, and also told Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] on Sunday, who 'said "Good God!"' but Sanger supposes he will have 'sufficiently recovered from his astonishment' by now to write. All 'fog & rain & general damnation' here, with the 'climax of [Sanger's] miseries' being the party his mother is going to give, to which she will invite his friends and they will accept; asks if Bob agrees with his own loathing of parties, and hopes that 'there won't be many in hell'. Has not yet seen McT[aggart]'s wife, but reports of her are so 'rediculously [sic] favourable' that he is bound to be disappointed when he does. Has reclaimed something [illegible] for Bob, having 'meekly paid the money' as he 'felt too lazy to make a fuss'. Sends love to Roger and regards to Mrs Fry.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Very sorry to hear of Madame Hubrecht's illness; understands that Bessie will not be able to leave her for some time; hopes she will recover soon though it is a bad time of year for bronchitis. Will be glad to have Bessie whenever she can come, except for the few days around their move to London, which they intended would be around 19 February. Was anxious for Bessie to come to Welcombe as she and Robert would enjoy walks and drives in the countryside and seeing Stratford; hopes she may still be able to spend a week there, then visit the Frys and return to them for a few days in London. Glad Bessie has told Robert to stop in Italy; he writes 'very contentedly from Ravello' and she hopes he has got on with his play.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - The Trevelyans have been to stay for two days at a 'little inn' at Wooler, visiting Flodden Field and Ford Castle. Continues the letter next day, after having been interrupted by 'the school treat'. Today a 'party of High School mistresses from Newcastle' are spending the whole day at Wallington. Hopes that there will be fine weather when Elizabeth comes in early August, and that she will stay while Annie [Philips, Caroline's sister] is there; understands that she and Robert both want to settle down at home so they must not feel bound to pay a long visit. Sure the Cambo Exhibition, which is on 18 Aug, will amuse Elizabeth. Charlie will be at home for the first half of the month, so there will be a family party with friends too. Delighted the Enticknaps are being helpful in getting everything in order. The clavichord [by Dolmetsch, decorated by Helen Fry] will be very interested to have. Meggiy [sic] Price asked about the piano, so Elizabeth should write when she is ready for it. Supposes she is not finding much time for the violin at the moment; the drawing room at Wallington is good for music. Wonders whether the 'Cambridge table has arrived. G[eorge] was very angry with his old Mrs Larkins about it'. Apologises for a 'most disjointed letter' since the young ladies have arrived and she has taken them for a long walk since starting the letter. Marie [Hubrecht] has sent her a 'capital photo' of the wedding party. Cannot get their furniture from Thunnissn [?] due to the continuing strike at Rotterdam. Will pay Elizabeth for the carriage of the goods from Welcombe.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad Elizabeth is enjoying her visit and has seen the [Gilbert?] Murrays; is 'so fond of Mary'. Letters to G[eorge] and J[anet] should be sent to the Wards, staying at Villa Bonaventura, Cadenabbia, who will forward them on. The latest news of them is from Florence; they were 'very happy'. Has had 'such a nice note' from Miss [Mary?] Fletcher, and has asked Imogen to play, since they are coming [to Caroline's party]. Arrangements for meeting; including the concert they are going to together. Encloses an invitation to the party [?] in case Robert would like to ask [Henry] Previté; they should say if there is anyone else they would like to come. She and Sir George liked Mr Howells, and found Mrs Atherton amusing. Very glad Elizabeth found Mrs F [Helen Fry?] better, but it 'does not seem satisfactory'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Is sorry 'about the wee doggie'; it is very sad but she hopes 'he may recover'. Is sending some game today; the grouse should be eaten first but the pheasants should keep until they return from Stocks [the Wards' country house]. Sir George has recovered, and he and his three friends are 'very happy together'; it is 'too funny sometimes to hear their reminiscences'; Sir George and Lord Belper 'took up an argument just where they left it 41 years ago!'. Mary is here; she and Charles are very happy; she 'certainly improves on acquaintance' and told Caroline that she was 'dreadfully uncomfortable' when staying in August, this is probably what 'made her so abrupt'. Mary is 'enchanted' with the house: they have a 'very tiny one in London' which is not as nice as Cheyne Gardens [George Trevelyan's new house]. Wants to hear what Elizabeth thinks of Cheyne Gardens; they will have fun on Friday and wishes she could be there. Is 'deeply grieved [sic] for Fry's anxiety [about his wife]'. Booa is 'very jealous about the apples & would like to have some'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes the 'invalid' [Thomas Sturge Moore?] is better and can return home soon, though sure he is comfortable at the Mill House; Mrs Moore seemed 'such a nice creature, with her pretty French manners & sweet face'; sure Elizabeth likes helping her. Keen to hear whether Elizabeth got to Tunbridge [for the Conference, see 11/107]; admire her for having canvassed. She herself has had 'urgent telegrams' about a women's meeting in Horsham today; would be wonderful if Erskine won. Sir George is very pleased at [Theodore] Roosevelt's victory. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter have been staying for a couple of nights. Mary's cousin Blanche Stanley has been staying with her, who has a 'lovely soprano voice' and has been well taught. Mary has also got Charles to sing better; they are away now. Sends love to Robert, asks if he would like his "1001 Gems [of Poetry]" to be sent. Looking forward to the play. Asks if Elizabeth would like to have a box of chrysanthemums sent next week, and whether Mrs [Helen] Fry would like some, or Mrs Moore when they get back.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Wonders if Elizabeth got to Tunbridge yesterday. The H[enry] Y[ates] Thompsons, Hilda and Audrey Trevelyan have been to stay; they had 'a "tea picnic" on Wednesday at the Gibbet'. Miss Martin came last night and is to stay for a long visit as she is 'quite "one of the family"; hopes Elizabeth will see her. As 6 Aug is Bank Holiday, would be best if Elizabeth and Robert keep to their first plan and come the week before; Friday would be best as the trains 'are terribly late on Saturday'. She should bring lots of music, as Heathcote Long is coming early in August and is a good musician. Audrey Trevelyan played 'very nicely' when she was here. Glad Elizabeth liked Dolmetsch, who is 'a genius in his way'. Asks how the Frys are, and whether they are coming north this year. Hopes the furniture is arrived, that things are getting settled, and that Robert can 'work comfortably'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear Elizabeth has been 'well & cheerful & busy' and that George has been to visit; will see him on Tuesday and hear what he thinks of the Mill House. Sorry she missed a music lesson, but glad [Johann] Kruse has not 'gone abroad altogether' and that she will have another soon. Hopes Robert is getting on well with his work and will be ready for another holiday when they go to Pen Moel [home of Caroline's sister Margaret]. Charlie has been here again this week; next week is the pheasant shooting. Has to go to London next week, 'rather a horrid long journey for one day' and must go to Welcombe the week after as she and Sir George have 'quite decided to go abroad'. Wonders how Elizabeth will get on with Miggy [Price], who is 'very excitable sometimes' and talks so much she finds her 'very tiring'. Glad Elizabeth's aunt got through her journey to Holland; hopes the treatment at Utrecht will help; supposes Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht] will be able to look after her as well as her own husband; Elizabeth's uncle will be lonely. Charlie was pasting the wedding photographs into a book last night; 'sad to think how much illness there has been since in the group'. Asks if Mrs [Helen] Fry is keeping well; hopes 'the lantern arrived for the 2nd lecture [by Roger Fry?].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Returned 'quite comfortably', and found Sir George 'well & cheerful'. Miss Martin had been 'a very good companion'. Sidney Lee, Miss [Lily?] Noble and Ella Pease came on Sunday, but they are alone again now. Will send Elizabeth's Christmas present with the hamper going to Gr[osvenor] Cr[escen[t]; it will be there on Saturday morning so can be collected if she stays in town for Friday night. There will be 'a little "pot pourri" in the parcel also'; sent some flowers yesterday. Sorry Elizabeth's cough continued to trouble her; asks if it is gone now and what the doctor thought of it; also when they plan to go abroad. Good that Elizabeth can leave Mrs E[nticknap] in charge of the house. Hopes Mrs [Helen] Fry keeps well and that 'the event [the birth of her child?] will come off soon'. Madame Grandmont has written kindly, and seems 'cheerful about her husband' Wishes Elizabeth could see the 'school children's [Christmas] tree. It is so pretty in the Hall'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - The 'bits of furniture' Elizabeth and Robert have got will be a 'great improvement'; the hall is so pretty it was a shame to keep the 'ugly bookcase'; thinks the sideboard will be a 'nicer & more permanent present than the wine'. Glad that Elizabeth liked the Joneses [Herbert and Lily?]; 'always delightful when friends keep up to one's ideal'. Had a party of visitors this week but they have now all left: Sir Kenelm and Lady Digby, old friends of hers and Sir George's; Charles [Roden]? and Victoria [Alexandrina?] Buxton; and Jack and Alice Pollock. They 'made plenty of noise in the evening over various games; there was a shoot, when the 'girls went to Rothbury & spent the day on the Crag Side Hills'; another day everyone went to Rothbury Lake and Crag. Charlie went off for two days walking with Charles Buxton, who is 'better & stronger than he was'. as is Victoria, but they still both have 'very delicate health' which is 'most unfortunate as they are so full of life & interests'. Sends love to Robert and hopes 'the publisher [Reginald Brimley Johnson] has been amenable'; it 'will be most interesting to see the drawings [by Roger Fry; for Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"]'. Hopes the Frys are well and the baby [Julian] 'flourishing'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Very sorry to hear the news about Elizabeth's uncle; hopes this new anxiety will not last long; reassures her about the success of modern operations. Sorry the boy [Augustus Enticknap] has measles; it is 'a light illness at this time of year'. Elizabeth must be careful about infections, and 'not let other people be exposed to it without their knowledge': the Frys should not come to the house while 'Mrs E. is going about her work freely'. Asks when Elizabeth will come up; thought the dress 'very pretty'; Pantlin should be ready for another fitting at the end of the month. A postscript tells her to ask Robert whether he 'remembers giving the measles to Arnold's boys'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad Elizabeth is seeing some friends, and that the '[house] business is moving on'; advertisement from "Country Life", showing prices usually asked in Surrey, originally enclosed. Went to Newcastle yesterday to hear Mrs Ward 'speak at the opening of some "Special Schools"', which she did 'very well. Saw various 'Hodgkins & Peases's', and brought Mrs Ward and Dorothy back to stay at Wallington. Next week they are expecting Aunt Annie [Philips], Phil [Morgan Philips] Price, Hilton Young, Eleanor Cropper and Cicely Wedgwood; next week Theodore [Llewelyn Davies?], Mary Bell and Dorothy Wedderburnl. Elizabeth and Robert will see them if they come on 20 August, though they do not have to decide yet. The weather is so windy she has to tie on her hat. Keith [the head gardener] is sending some more fruit today. Sorry that Mrs Fry had 'the trouble of writing twice'; it was 'such a pretty letter, in picturesque handwriting'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Would like very much to see the plans [for Elizabeth and Robert's new house, being built at Leith Hill]; hopes they will bring them up to London. It will be a busy time, but they must 'set apart an hour'. Asks whether they will be there on the evening of [Charles and Mary's] wedding, 6 January; Annie [Philips] will be staying with them, and Elizabeth and Robert could come to dine and show the plans then. Elizabeth can have her dress sent to Grosvenor Crescent and change there; they must leave by one o'clock. Believes 'Valescure is still very nice'; seems wise not to make a very long journey in January; expects they will come back earlier than usual to 'look after the house'. George has a cold, and they had a very quiet Christmas day; '[Charles Augustus?] Fitch and a game of whist in the evening being the high water mark of festivity'. Very distressed about [Roger] Fry [over his wife's illness]. Hopes Elizabeth got the pheasants by Christmas day. Very sorry 'the doggie did not recover'. Is reading James's Life of Story ["William Wetmore Story and His Friends"] which is 'in its way quite delightful' and 'makes one long to be in Rome'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Nice to hear of 'sunshine and flowers' from Elizabeth, as it is still very wintry here. Is glad to spend some time in London, see friends, and feel 'in the centre of things'. Charles, M[ary], G[eorge] and J[anet] often visit, and are all cheerful. George and Janet's wedding is fixed for 19 March; the Wards have taken a house at Oxford for a week for it, it is 'an original business' and she hopes it will satisfy everyone 'except the orthodox!'. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club, and seen the Secretary, who says its future will be 'settled next month' but she thinks it will carried on. Interested by Elizabeth's account of Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]'s 'entertainment', and thinks it will be charming as 'the Italians have an artistic strain through all their vulgarity'. Does not think pipes [?] and jam will be useful [for bazaars], but would be glad if Madame Grandmont could send her five pounds worth of Taormina [embroidery and lace] work. Glad to hear the Frys are happier; has been very sorry for Roger Fry. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will get the question of the road [to the house they are having built at Leith Hill] settled soon; annoying to have lost the winter for building. Wonders what Bob is writing; hopes their translation work is progressing. Politics very interesting, but she thinks the Government will hold on. Has no sympathy for either side in the [Russo-Japanese] War, and wishes 'they could both be beaten'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Message left in case MacCarthy is out when Trevelyan calls: if Trevelyan does not fetch this [an unknown item], he will have it sent to the Mill House. His mission was not very successful. His mother returns tomorrow. Is going to Eton tonight. Thinks he must stay a few days with his mother, as he has not seen her for weeks; Trevelyan should expect him on Tuesday. Has got D'Annunzio and will bring it; checks whether Trevelyan took 'Sophy K'. Asks if the news about seeing [Roger] Fry means that his wife is ill again.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Distressed to hear things did not go well [regarding the birth of the Trevelyans' son, Julian?] and glad they seem to be better again. Is glad that Moore thinks his book good: says that he 'never understand[s] Moore but like[s] him very much', then corrects himself when he realises not G.E. Moore but [Thomas] Sturge Moore is meant. Was at Lady Ottoline's yesterday and saw Fry; his wife is at home and he seems in good spirits. Went to 'the Sicilians' [the production of Sinopoli's "La Zolfara" at the Lyric Theatre?]

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'my dear Bob'; is very glad to hear from him; was just last week that she left Amsterdam and he went with Paul [Hubrecht?] 'to visit Volendam and buy Dutch cheeses' but it seems a long time ago. Paul wrote a 'rather amusing & ironical account of that day'. He must have had a bad crossing as the weather has been 'most depressing ever since'; 'poor Grandmont is shivering & probably longing to get away', but the coming of Bob's friends the [Roger] Frys will keep them longer. Will miss them very much; Bramine has 'proven to be such a friend', she has told her everything and she is 'a great help'. All her family 'have a somewhat inquisitive if not suspicious turn of mind' and have begun to have suspicions about her and Bob; not in an unkind sense but they want to know 'exactly what happened or did not happen'. Her uncle, aunt, and [cousin] Marie stayed with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] in Amsterdam; is sure they compared notes. Bramine is a help to 'appease their minds'; would also help if Trevelyan wrote a 'collins' to her aunt which will make it 'all look more natural'. She and Bob must continue to be quite 'sincere and truthful' with each other, and 'everything will come right in the end'; scolds him a little for leaving the house without saying goodbye to her uncle or Grandmont, though her family found his absent-midnedness comical.

Is writing in the drawing room, hearing the 'continual tinkle tinkle of the piano' as Grandmont practises some Haydn trios. They spent at the evening recently at the house of the painter [Willem?] Witsen, where Bramine works at her etching every day; played some music and even persuaded Witsen to join them with his cello, though he is 'terribly shy and modest' he plays very well. Has been practising hard herself recently, as she wants to be in good shape if she goes to have lessons from the new teacher in Amsterdam who has replaced her old teacher [Joseph] Cramer. Asks how Bob's new house is getting on; asks its name and address, and when he will move in. He will miss the Frys at first; hopes they like the Dutch cheese, and that it will not be 'like the story of the cheese in [Jerome's] "Three Men in a Boat"'. Is reading Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser], and has given up the Brownings' letters for a while. 'Correspondence is unsatisfactory in so many ways'; wishes she could see more of Bob, though she tells him not to 'interpret this for more than [she means] it'; tells him to write as often and fully as he can. Will try to puzzle over his 'metaphysical quotation', though doubts she will understand it entirely without further explanation; wonders about the value of such questions, though she does greatly admire 'the philosophical turn of mind' as long as it does not hamper any other enquiry. Bramine sends kind regards to Bob; she and Grandmont apparently always speak of him 'by that disrespectful name', so she supposes she may also. Notes in a postscript that he did not tell her how old he is; guesses twenty-seven.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill-House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - They seem to be in similar circumstances this week: she has been helping to clean her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]'s big bookcases; the charwoman who helped her 'was amusing enough' and made some 'delightfully naïve remarks' about the books. Elizabeth sometime lends books for her or her boys to read. Last Monday they moved to the Hague; the three summers they have spent at Ede seem to have passed very quickly, thinks they were 'the happiest & most interesting' parts of her life so far so she has become attached to the place and 'even to the ugly house' and is sad to think of the new 'unsympathetic' owner changing it, though he can do little to the woods and moors. Is going to spend a few days at Almelo with an old married friend whom she has not seen for some time; she is very musical and her husband seems to be a good pianist; also Marie [Hubrecht's] American friend Maud Howard is coming to stay tomorrow and she is 'not over anxious to see much of her'. Marie is then going to spend the winter in Florence though, like Maud Howard, she is a little vague about her plans.

Has changed her mind about 'forcing circumstances' and now thinks it would be good to see Bob again; suggests he comes over to the Hague next month, on the pretext of doing some work such as a translation of [Joost van] Vondel with which she could help, to make it seem less strange to her uncle and aunt; would have to ask him to stay at a hotel unless her uncle invites him to stay, and knows all this will give him trouble. He must write and tell her sincerely what he thinks. She has discussed the plan with Bramine [Hubrecht] who reassured her there was nothing wrong with it. Gives the address of her friend at Almelo, Mrs Salomonson Asser.

Has just seen a portrait of Bob's father 'on an old Financial Reform Almanack'; remarks on his 'charming eyes'. Hopes Bob is enjoying himself bringing 'dry bones' to live. Asks if he went to the concerts [given by Julius Engelbert Röntgen and Johannes Messchaert] and appreciated the singer. Is reading the Brownings' letters again, which are charming but get terribly sentimental. The [Second Boer] war is indeed horrible; asks if there are reasonable views on its duration and 'what the end can be'; asks whether there are as many 'contradictory muddling telegrams' in British newspapers as in Dutch ones; glad that there are 'so many rightly thinking English', but they are still a minority. The Grandmonts are at Florence, but unfortunately will have left by the time the Frys arrive. Very kind of Trevelyan to transcribe some of his verses for her; looks forward to reading them though she says she is a 'highly unpoetical being'. Signs herself 'Bessie'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Was glad to get Bob's two letters and hear he had arrived safely at Milan. Forwarded some letters to Ravello on Sunday which Bob's mother had sent her, with 'a very kind note' [originally enclosed]; Bob is a 'naughty son' not to give her his Ravello address in time, and she will send it to her tomorrow. Thinks she would like Bob's mother to call her Elizabeth, as she asks; her English friends do, and then she will reserve 'Bessie' for 'more intimate purposes'. Also encloses a letter from [Alphonse] Grandmont which might entertain him, as might 'the bad poem in the beginning'. Is glad Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is being so helpful; shows he 'has regained his common sense' after quarrelling with Mademoiselle Thomley and getting 'away from under her influence', now he is 'much with the Dahlerups'. Hopes this letter will greet Bob on his arrival at Ravello, and that he enjoys 'all the good, beautiful things of life' there and gets some good work done. Asks if he remembered to give his letter to Mrs [Helen] Fry, and to buy himself some 'foreign paper' and a razor strop. If not she will have to think of him as 'a shaggy Robinson Crusoe-like poet' writing 'poems and love-letters on odd ends of paper... used by the peasants to wrap up their fruit'; has been enjoying seeing her own paper sent back 'bedabbled' with Bob's dear but 'very untidy and cook-like writing'. Had her photograph taken this morning; it happened so quickly that she did not have time to think 'what kind of simpering smile' would suit her best; will send Bob one. People keep asking to see Bob's photograph and are surprised when she does not have one.

Jeanne Salomonson stayed till Sunday morning. On Friday night Bessie's aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven]'s two sisters [Alida and Agatha] came to visit with a girl who is living with them for a while, 'a most horribly uninteresting dull & unartistic kind of being' who yet had the 'pretence of being very musical'. playing the piano abominably but trying 'the most difficult & beautiful things'; felt 'rubbed up the wrong way' when she went to bed, 'horribly sarcastic & terribly sour'. Mr Kattendijke came on Saturday to accompany Jeanne and they did some 'wonderful Brahms songs'; on Sunday they went to a piano recital by Harold Bauer which was partly quite good, but at the end he played 'such horrid firework things' that it nearly spoilt everything else and made him think less of him. Has had a nice letter from Madame Goriany, the Austrian lady Bob met at Roccabella [Taormina, Sicily]. Is working hard on the translation for Ambro [Hubrecht] about 'the absorption of fatty matter into the intestine'. Their cousins, the van Deldens, and their daughter are coming tonight; soon they are going south and then perhaps to the Dutch colonies. Has written to Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s mother about the violin, and is curious to know the answer.

Continues the letter next day: is going to spend the day in Leiden, first calling on a 'dear cousin' [Louise Hubrecht] who has known her since childhood and lunching with Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] at her mother's. Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht] appeared suddenly at dinner; an enormous whale was stranded on the coast two days ago, and he has secured it for his university [Utrecht]; she has been able to give back her translation as the usual man is well again; he says he has sent his 'American speech' to Ravello. A pity the Frys cannot visit [on the way back from Italy]; hopes to see them soon.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Seems Bob may be staying longer in Milan; is sorry for the Frys as Roger Fry is suffering from a bald cold. Has received a parcel from Bob's mother with photographs of his parents and brothers and is very glad to have them. Is glad Bob is enjoying himself at Milan and seeing many beautiful things; curious he has never been before; she remembers the "Cenacolo" [Leonardo's "Last Supper"] 'above all others', and many beautiful things at the Brera, though she and Bramine [Hubrecht] were there during a thunderstorm when it was very dark; looks forward to going again. Bob must not be 'too anxious' about her: she has got over her initial misery at their parting and now he is 'haunting [her] only pleasantly', as he says; she could not be made miserable by thoughts of him as she loves him too much; also trusts him completely.

Returns to the letter in the evening; has been out in the rain to see the dentist and 'arrange a torture hour with him', though less needs to be done than she feared; tonight is Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht]'s third lecture, and Paul [his son] has come to see the whale [see 8/14] and will probably go to the lecture on her ticket. Her aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven] has had a letter from Bramine, with an 'enthusiastic account' of how they [the Grandmonts?] are looking after the eye patients [at Taormina] and how helpful Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is now. Returns the next day to scold Bob for saying that 'modern art scarcely seems to exist' in Italy; says this is too sweeping a statement and fears 'Fry's dogmas' have been influencing him after all; hopes he will always 'be as inclusive as possible'. Went to Ambro's lecture after all; Paul stayed at home and worked, and this morning has gone to keep an eye on the work of cutting off the fat and baring the skeleton of the whale; he sends many greetings to Bob. The Frys' name for her sounds 'very splendid indeed' and is certainly better than 'Amoretta' which reminds her of 'amourette', a pet hate of hers; she would still like him to call her Bessie or Bess. Very good of him to send her a ring; she will always wear it on the fourth finger of her left hand; a shame he will not be able to put it on her finger and he will have to wear it somehow first.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for sending "The Speaker" with her letter; likes his poem though does not feel she entirely understands it. Her uncle has taken her aunt out in a carriage for some fresh air and she feels much better for it. Spent Sunday in Amsterdam with the Röntgens who were all well and cheerful; called on [Bram] Eldering in the afternoon and arranged to have lessons once a fortnight; he seems to be 'full of fun & humour'. Yesterday went to see Louise [Hubrecht] and had a very good conversation with her; Louise thinks Maria van Hoeven should go to Ems or Wiesbaden for a few weeks for her health with a nurse, while her husband stayed at home with Bessie to look after him; afraid that her uncle and aunt will take a lot of persuading. Is writing to Bramine today to tell her their plan to marry at Whitsuntide and see if she can come. Mien [Abrahamina Röntgen] is working some beautiful sheets and pillowcases, with embroidery and her own lace, to give them as a wedding present. Bessie is also practising the viola which they brought from Leiden so she can accompany the Brahms songs with Mr Kattendijke; today he sent an etching of a Dutch landscape as a wedding present. Hopes to be able to go to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture tomorrow, then on Monday there is a Röntgen and Messchaert concert, though since Messchaert is at Wiesbaden and not yet well this might be cancelled. There is a Vondel exhibition at Amsterdam; wishes that they could go together. Asks how the Frys are. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother, also a note from Dorothy Fletcher saying they were sorry to have missed Bob and Bessie's call.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinse[gracht], the Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Hopes Bob enjoys his week in Cornwall; asks if Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies is going too. Is very sorry to hear about Mrs [Helen] Fry's illness; even a slight attack of pleurisy is serious, and it shows how weak she is, at least about the lungs; the amount she smokes cannot be good for her. Thinks the measurements of the box for music [see 9/42] are quite right; asks if the partitions could be taken out to give more room. Will write to thank George and Charles [Trevelyan]. Went to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture about the evolution of the eye last night, 'interesting but hard to follow'. Will talk to her uncle this evening about the wedding since the answer from [Thomas?] Barclay, the Paris lawyer, has come at last; it seems the consul must be present; has had 'another wretched discussion' with her uncle about whether the consul should be invited to the wedding breakfast, which she does not want; her aunt has now talked her uncle round in secret. Has been reading an article in the "Revue de Paris" on 'Flaubert et l'Afrique'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall and forwarded to him at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Will study the patterns Bob has sent her and send them to London, with her choice for his 'nuptial trousers' and travelling suit. Will speak again to her uncle about Bob's objections to writing himself to the consul [Henry Turing]. Entreats Bob for Sir Henry House and his wife not to be invited to the wedding breakfast: her uncle and aunt, who will send out the invitations, do not know the Howards at all so it does not matter that they are 'very distant relations', while their presence would give 'a different ton to the whole business' and make her miserable. It is also likely that Grandmont and Bramine would not come if the Howards were invited, due to their objection to 'jingos'. Does not see it as necessary to invite the Howards, unless Bob's parents wish it especially. Sometimes wishes they could marry 'quietly without anyone near', though knows it could be a lovely day with happy memories; wishes people could 'take it easier'. Returns to the letter after a walk with her aunt, who agrees with her about having to give up part of her musical interests after marriage; understand what Bob means, and thinks she may have expressed herself too strongly in her first letter [9/45], which is the 'wretched side of correspondence'; will wait until she sees him to discuss it. Sees what Bob means about Mrs [Helen] Fry's cigarette smoking; cannot quite feel as he does yet; knows she does have 'a great and natural tendency to rectilineal & rather exclusive argumentation'; hopes she can 'suspend judgment' as Bob says. Does not know enough about German literature to comment on what he says about German literature, but emphasises the advantage, 'which the English nation as a whole is slow & rare in acknowledging' of being able to talk to foreigners in their own language; as an example, it was a real shame that Bob and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen were unable to converse properly; this is why she was so disappointed when he once refused to learn as 'it seemed such an insular British way of looking at it'. Ordered the book [Stevenson's "The Suicide Club"] for Jan [Hubrecht] and he was very pleased. Mr Kattendijke and Mr Loudon are coming to make music this afternoon. Lula [Julius Röntgen] is recovering from his severe illness. Joachim is going to play with his quartet in Amsterdam next Saturday, and Mien has got her a ticket; will stay with Mrs Guye [or Guije], Gredel's mother; would love to go to the supper party the Röntgens are having for Joachim after the concert but expects Mien has too many guests to invite her. Is glad not to see Bob with his beard, and hopes he never decides to grow one. Asks who Jacobi is, and for Bob to tell him what 'the Cambridge Moore [i.e. George] thinks of his play.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ede - Ma Retraite. - Delay in writing on her return due to a few days in bed; their plans now finalised, and Trevelyan would be very welcome to visit in September. Is going to see her friends the Bowmans next week and will write to Mr and Mrs [Roger?] Fry if she does visit them for a day from Joldwynds. Most of July her 'married cousin Mrs Röntgen and her boys' will be with her, then in August 'she is going to Denmark taking her sister with her'. Hope Trevelyan will be able to come 'and have a look at Holland and Dutchmen! Some say [they] are not a specifically Dutch family' but they could perhaps show him some 'more so' if he liked. Is very much enjoying the letters of [Robert] Browning and his wife, calling them 'delightful, splendid creatures' and discussing their portraits; asks whether Robert Browning was Jewish. Will be in London for two days before going to Joldwynds, but does not ask him to meet her as she does not know her address there yet and fears there will be time for nothing but shopping: a 'nightmare' for her. Perhaps they could meet at Trevelyan's friend [Roger Fry]'s house.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Is glad Bob thinks 'as strongly about what is called English "Patriotism" just now' as they do; it is certainly 'a lamentable affair' and war seems unavoidable. Bramine [Hubrecht] was shocked when she read her Bob's wish for a 'fiasco, not so much for the sake of the Boers as for our own' as she 'feels very strongly for the Boers'. Read full account of the Trafalgar Square meeting the morning before Bob's letter came; was startled to hear he had been there as the newspaper account was nowhere near 'as dull & pacific' as he found it. Bramine has just brought her a letter from Mrs [Helen] Fry to Bob, which she should have given to him on his arrival; hopes this has not caused him or the Frys any inconvenience. Asks if the 'Japanese melodrama' was any good, and whether he is still in London. Suggests he uses foreign paper for his letters; his last was over-weight; makes a pun about his letters becoming 'too dear' for her. His letter is 'very valuable to her... whatever the future may have in store'. Wishes they could see each other more often, but does not think they should 'force circumstances'; admits she is a 'muddled creature' and does not yet see what is right and what she feels; hopes she will get clearer, while Bob is 'noble & generous & will wait', which she thinks is better for both their sakes. Discusses a line from Balzac. Will ask for more reading suggestions when she has finished the ones she wants to read; has just finished [Joseph] Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser] and 'worship[s] him all the more'. Bob is also a 'shrewd guesser of age', as she turned twenty-four on May 21st. Always used to be thought older than she was till a few years ago when the reverse became true. Thinks it is comical how few people, especially women, are 'perfectly natural' about their age; asks if Bob has 'often had the benefit of women in society and friendship'. Last week she and her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht] went to see "Citio", at Doorn, where they are to go next summer; it is smaller than the one at Ede but nicely situated and they wil probably like it. The Grandmonts are to leave by the end of next week; the Röntgens are coming for the day next Sunday to 'say farewell to Ede. She [Mien Röntgen] was married from this house'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ede; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London EC - Bob has still not given her his address in Dorking; supposes this letter will reach him in London; hopes he has a good time at Harrow, 'beat them all hollow' and not suffer any broken bones. Asks if he has given Bramine [Hubrecht]'s sketch to his mother and whether she likes it. A shame the Frys did not see the current glorious weather; she is going for long farewell walks to her favourite places in Ede; the Grandmonts are leaving on Friday, hates goodbyes. The Frys wrote a nice letter; he seems to have felt as Bob does that the Dutch 'ways of thinking & looking at things' are not so different from the British; she thought so too, and expects she could soon get to know them well; felt a little constraint when talking of Bob as she was unsure how much they knew. Asks Bob what new doctrine 'the philosopher [George] Moore' has been convincing him of; his account of 'the newly married philosopher' [J E M MacTaggart] made her laugh and would make a good subject for a story; she has often wished she could 'write a huge "life"-novel' but finds it impossible. Asked Grandmont about "[Till] Eulenspiegel", who also thought it was originally written in Flanders, but the Germans have very old manuscripts too, and it is rather like old works like "Reineke Fuchs [Reynard the Fox]" which also has an uncertain origin. Is very glad Bob is learning German. Reminds him that he said she could read some more of his "Mahabarata" [sic: "Mahabharata"] poem and some others. Bob's lost umbrella has been found and passed on to Paul [Hubrecht] as promised. They have given up the house at Doorn, "Citio", due to difficulties with the proprietor, so must search again; she, her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht], and Grandmont looked at an old country house near Haarlem on Monday, but it was too gloomy and damp.

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