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Fry, Helen (1864-1937) artist
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Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

6 Racknitz Strasse, Dresden. - Bob's letter reached here before he and Helen did, as Berlin kept them much longer than they expected; all the galleries closed at 3 pm so the officials could have their 'mittags essen' [sic]; not dining properly in the evening is the 'only really uncivilized thing they do'. Liked [Georg?] Gronau, whom B.B. [Bernard Berenson] introduced to him, and who took him to see a fine private collection of drawings and sculptures. Dresden is much nicer than Berlin, 'full of fantastic Barocheries and Rocochoneries'; the Gallery is huge but there are 'very few primitives & lots of Rubens & Corregio & 17th century people' whom Fry likes to 'look at lazily'. Helen 'won't come round' to Correggio and doesn't like [Raphael's] "Sistine Madonna"; to Fry's great surprise he finds it 'simply glorious', and 'Raphael painting almost like Titian'; wonders what he would have done had he lived. He and Helen 'never shall agree on Raphael Correggio & Rubens'; is 'almost annoyed' that he always likes the great artists. [Nathaniel] Wedd's "Quarterly" is very interesting; agrees with Bob that it is a shame 'to make it directly polemical', but he does not 'quite know these logrolled Oxford men'; in art he thinks 'most reputations are logrolled so one gets to think it the normal way'. Helen is asleep; they have both been unwell recently due to German food, but are getting well since they 'are in a young ladies Pension & are fed on pap'. Amusing about Miss V. d. H [Elizabeth Van der Hoeven] guessing; thinks she is good at that; is also 'frightened of her a little because she always seems to be observing more than she shows'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Has not heard from Fry for a while: hopes Helen and Julian are well. Description of 'a Julian at the hotel': Julian Cotton of the Indian Civil Service, honeymooning with his Neapolitan wife [neé Gigia Riccardi Arlotta]. Other guests are Kershaw and his friend Perry, an ex-actor; 'the Lapchinski', who luckily only came for a week; and [William] Wyse of Trinity, an Apostle who has been forced by ill health to give up work for a year. Goes every day to the Cimbrone, passing Fry's old studio, and has overheard prayers there as if to 'rid the room of... some devil who has...haunted there since you painted him in your picture of St Antony'. Taking tea today with Mrs Read [sic: Mrs Reid, widow of Francis Nevile Reid of Villa Rufolo]. Bessie is learning Latin and Trevelyan is rewriting the old play 'which sent [Fry] and Helen to sleep once'. Has heard nothing from Johnson about "Polyphemus" and only seen two reviews. Bridges wrote him an appreciative letter, though he did not like the Faun's song or make much of the irregular metres. Will probably stay at Berenson's on the way north; asks if he and Fry might meet around Florence. Fry should read Defoe's "Moll Flanders", which is the best novel in English. Bessie is now reading "Robinson Crusoe" to him as a 'shaving book', which is also excellent.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, prov. di Salerno. - Explains how the rumour of Fry's death [see also 4/46 and 4/47] spread: it originated from [William] Sharp who told the Grandmonts at Taormina that he had seen an obituary; they then wrote to Helen [Fry], and to Bessie who wired to the Enticknaps who replied this morning that the Frys were both well, and only then told Trevelyan. Hopes the obituary was not that of Fry's brother, cousin [Lewis George Fry] the painter or any other near relation. Has finished the first act of his new play, on a mediaeval theme. His "Cecilia Gonzaga" is coming out in a month or two. Johnson has been bothering him over the £10 Trevelyan would not pay [for printing “Polyphemus and Other Poems”], claiming it is Fry's fee, which Trevelyan does not think has been paid. Does not want to quarrel with Johnson as he has the remainder of the edition but thinks he is trying to swindle them. Asks whether the Frys have changed houses; also whether he has done anything on their Claude, whether the Bellinis [works by Jacopo Bellini discovered by Fry in Venice which he hoped would be bought by the National Gallery] will come, and about 'the Cosimo and your petition to the Balfours'. News from Ravello about ‘the Kershaw’, Madam Palumbo, Tufti, Francesca and Mrs Reid. Fry’s portrait of ‘Old Pal. [Pasquale Palumbo]’ is much treasured by Madam Palumbo. They are reading [Richardson's] "Clarissa". Going to Palermo in about a month, and hope to see Lina. Berenson is in good humour with Fry; Trevelyan has been correcting some of his proofs.

Letter from Margery Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Rd, Hampstead. - Writing on her brother Roger's behalf: apologises that he has no time this week to meet Trevelyan but would like very much to see him next week. Helen is sleeping and eating well; she was very restless on Sunday but quieter now, though more depressed. Roger visited yesterday but did not see her. Her doctor seems to have encouraged him to be hopeful, but he evidently expects a long period of recovery.

Letter from Margery Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Madeira Cottage, Lyme Regis. - Good of Trevelyan to write so promptly about the scheme for a masque to mark the opening of the new Library [at Somerville College, Oxford, see 4/55 and 4/56]; sketches the loggia below the library, with disposition of pillars inside and steps in front, where she thinks the masque could be put on. Expects she could get twenty or thirty performers; it would be convenient if a rout of beasts were included as many old students made themselves costumes for a former performance. Feels it should be more of a pageant than a drama: does not think there are any particularly good actors, and it would fit the spirit of the occasion. The opening of the library will be early in June, which may not leave Trevelyan enough time.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes the 'invalid' [Thomas Sturge Moore?] is better and can return home soon, though sure he is comfortable at the Mill House; Mrs Moore seemed 'such a nice creature, with her pretty French manners & sweet face'; sure Elizabeth likes helping her. Keen to hear whether Elizabeth got to Tunbridge [for the Conference, see 11/107]; admire her for having canvassed. She herself has had 'urgent telegrams' about a women's meeting in Horsham today; would be wonderful if Erskine won. Sir George is very pleased at [Theodore] Roosevelt's victory. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter have been staying for a couple of nights. Mary's cousin Blanche Stanley has been staying with her, who has a 'lovely soprano voice' and has been well taught. Mary has also got Charles to sing better; they are away now. Sends love to Robert, asks if he would like his "1001 Gems [of Poetry]" to be sent. Looking forward to the play. Asks if Elizabeth would like to have a box of chrysanthemums sent next week, and whether Mrs [Helen] Fry would like some, or Mrs Moore when they get back.

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Nr. Dorking. - Leaving on Saturday or Sunday for Siena, where they do not expect to spend more than a week, before going on to Pisa and Milan. His book ["Giovanni Bellini"] has been attacked by '[Charles] Loeser & Co who think they will be dealing a blow at B.B. [Bernard Berenson]'; it seems to be 'humorous'; though the point they make is 'ridiculous'. He and Helen went on an expedition with Mrs [Janet] Ross, whom they like very much. Bob must tell them when and where to expect him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Received Bob's letter this morning, and nerved herself to tell her uncle and aunt about his intended arrival; her aunt 'understood at once' and made no difficulties, though said her uncle may make some; she then found her uncle writing to Bramine [Hubrecht] in his study and told him, he was amazed but wanted to 'grasp at once the whole situation' and told her he saw quite through her pretext and understood everything but she begged him not to speak further about it. So they are both quite cheerful about the subject, and are probably discussing it now she has gone to bed.

Writing on the next day, she says that things were not so cheerful that morning, and her uncle took up the subject of Bob's visit again after breakfast; will not go into detail, but he does tend to 'attach enormous importance to convention' and it is hard for him to take everything in. But he does not want to make things difficult, and will leave her 'quite free' when Bob is here; he would like Bob to pay a formal visit on his first afternoon in the Hague, when the pretext for Bob's stay, 'poor old Vondel', must be mentioned; Bob will then be able to come the following morning and probably regularly to do some work. In the afternoon when the weather is fine she has to walk with her aunt, who she thinks would like Bob to join them. Thought he might stay a fortnight; if it suits him to go on early to Italy of course he must, though asks if he is sure about meeting the Frys in Siena, as she thought they were going there before Florence, which is why the G[randmont]s did not meet them and why her cousin Marie [Hubrecht] has gone first to Lugano and Milan. Is sorry to hear Bob finds it hard to settle to work. Discusses further her objection to Bob's translation of a French phrase [from Ronsard]; thanks him for his 'little grammar lesson about "shall" and "will"'.

The latest news of the [Second Boer] war must be 'very distressing' to the English; asks if Bob still feels it would be good if the English were 'well beaten'. Of course thought of the war itself is 'an intense horror'. Asks if Bob knows anyone fighting; they have heard of some 'striking losses', such as the death of a 'very beloved nephew' of their friend Dr Koster [Tuimen Hendrik Blom Coster?]. The feeling against Britain is very strong in the Netherlands; 'flags were put up in many streets when the news of Ladysmith reached' them; wonders if Bob will mind that when he comes. Suggested the 12th as the day he should come since he had mentioned a [rugby?] football game the day before; would not deprive him the chance of 'displaying [his] chief if not only vanity' and hopes he will enjoy himself. and not come over 'with a blue eye & some fractured bones'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Asks if someone could book him a room at the Twee Steden, or the Angleterre if that is not possible; she need not come to meet him at the station since he will arrive so late. Berenson has given him a list of Russian books in translation to read. His mother says they should decide themselves whether he should accompany to England, and do as her uncle and aunt think right. Does hope she will be able to come on the 14th and spend some time at Welcombe. The Frys have got them a ring. Hopes her aunt is still better, as he could not bear not to see Bessie, will shave away the bristles from the journey so that they can pay each other some of their 'debt of K[isses]'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot [sic: Westcott], Dorking. - Apologises for not writing sooner; found [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson with the Frys and brought him back to sleep as there was not room at their house; he left before lunch then Bob spent the afternoon with the Frys. They went for a walk; the country looks 'delicious' and they saw lots of lambs 'who had just come into the world and seemed very pleased to be there'. Will send her a copy of the "Speaker" with one of his poems in it; it is almost the first he ever wrote so she must be lenient; Fry and Dickinson 'seem to like it'; it does not record 'any personal experiences. Does not know whether they will print the translations he sent them.

Finishes the next letter next day, before his breakfast of 'eggs and Van Hoōōten [sic: Van Houten] cocoa'. Expects to spend the morning organising his books, letters and papers. Dreamt they bought a 'cheap and good linen-cupboard at a sale'. Thinks he will write soon to Mrs Pepper at Borrowdale to ask if they are likely to have the house [Seatoller] to themselves in June, which would not commit them to going there. Thinks she would like that best of all the places he knows in England and Scotland.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot [sic: Westcott], Dorking. - Is writing in the 'little room' he hopes will be hers; the fire burns well and it is warm and looks 'quite nice' now he has sent the Insley furniture to the spare room. Thinks he has thought of a way to improve his play and is happier about it now. Is reading Mériméee's "Les Cosaques D'Autrefois ", which is 'stunning'. Will write to the Insleys about their furniture; there is plenty of room for her books. Has not seen the Frys since Sunday; he [Roger Fry] understood about distempering the bedroom since they do not like the paper, though he probably thinks they are making a mistake. Has nearly finished "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]; discusses why he does not 'take to it altogether'. Encloses a letter from his Aunt Meg [Price]; he knows nothing about pianos so she should tell him what to say. Someone suggested by [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen might help them choose; does not know whether his aunt's 'professional friend' is to be trusted. One day they will have room for a big piano, but expects this would have to be an upright.

Finishes the letter next morning. Is sorry her aunt is not as much stronger as she first thought; hopes that the finer weather will help. Expects it is right for her to sell the land; she would know better than he where to put the money. Very glad her uncle and aunt think Whitsuntide will do [for the wedding]; someone like [Abraham?] Bredius would probably be best as the witness; her uncle once suggested the consul at Rotterdam, if he were Dutch. Doubts if any of his friends will come; thinks he will not ask. Was stupid to leave Luzac's bill in London; has asked it to be sent to him.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House. - Continues the explanation of his sonnet from the last letter [9/116]; after jokingly describing the poem as 'terse, weighty, thrilling, magnificent, Dante-Baudelaire-Rossetti lines', he confesses that he does not think much of it, and wishes they [the "Speaker"] had published the translations they have returned. Is getting on 'fairly well' with the new plan of his play. Has only seen the Frys once since Sunday; he is 'very busy'. Is going to see Sanger in London on Monday before he starts [for Greece]. [George?] Moore has invited to join him, MacCarthy and another on their 'wonted Easter exhibition', this year to the Lizard in Cornwall; has been the last two years and liked it, but will decide nearer the time. Suggests that she might use the library as her study while he keeps the little room; noise does travel from the kitchen, but a baize or felt door would improve matters, and the Enticknaps are 'very quiet people'. Gussie is at school all day; he has in the past been 'a little noisy' in the evening, but is improving. Sophie has asked what books he would like [as a wedding present], suggesting an edition of Thackeray, or Browning (which he has); Thackeray would be good but perhaps he prefers Meredith. Has a Goethe and Heine; has read some "Faust" and means to do more; gets on quite well with a translation and dictionary, but very slowly.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Bri[tish] Mus[eum] Lib[rary]. - Is staying at Hare Court till Wednesday, when [Charles] Sanger starts for Greece; he is no better yet. Wrote to Aunt M[eg Price] about the piano suggesting 'delicately' that they might make an exchange [of an upright for a grand] one day; thinks it will be all right. Went on his bicycle to Dorking to see the Frys, and saw Laurence Binyon and another friend, with whom he went up Leith Hill. Has got on quite well with his play recently. Would like to see Bessie in her 'new spectacles, like a professor'; Curry & Paxton say Ambro [Hubrecht]'s spectacles are ready, asks whether he is to send them or bring them over. Thinks "Wuthering Heights" 'altogether more wonderful' than anything Charlotte [Bronte] wrote, though he does not 'depreciate Villette etc'. Forgot to take the measurements of the table but will as soon as he returns. Teases Bessie about her old fondness for 'the Sweedish [sic] Inst. doctor' [see 9/37]

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Expects Bob will soon return, but has sent a ring [for his engagement to Elizabeth van der Hoeven] to his hotel; thinks it very beautiful and appropriate. Has not found time to do Bob's house but will go over soon and give instructions for the study and friezes. The 'accursed [Second Boer] war is upsetting everything'; has only forty-two people signed up for his lectures, which start in a week. Helen says he is too pessimistic, but he does not see there is 'much room for people like us in a blatant jingo inflated nation'. Supposes that 'the most incompetent toady' gets to the top of the army just as at the National Gallery and the S[outh] Kensington [Museum]. Discusses Bob's poem, which he likes very much, though is not sure he gets 'this kind of medioeval business as well as [he does] classical'. Has been reading some of the Franciscan poets: Jacopone [da Todi] is 'stunning'; also praises [Saint] Bonaventura's meditations. Has found 'a new and splendid subject' for Bob in the Gospel of Nicodemus, which is 'terrible extravagant & Byzantine'; has told it to [Laurence] Binyon but does not expect he will use it before Bob returns.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Little news: Helen is more or less the same, though he thinks her sisters' visits help and her brother is going to see her soon, and this stage might go on for some time. He and Goldie [Dickinson] are enjoying Roundhurst, though he has been up at the British Museum all the week. Saw Binyon: does not think the anthology ["Garland of New Poetry" (1899)?] will be good; it is mostly Miss Coleridge and a few others; thinks Binyon has closed the subscription list. Asks Trevelyan to tell Berenson he is working on the dating of pictures: mentions two works by Gentile [Bellini]. Augustus [Enticknap] has whooping cough. A separate sheet added as postscript encourages Trevelyan to write a simple letter to Helen with advice on what to put: thinks 'part of the depression comes from an idea that she has done wrong and people disapprove'. Thanks Trevelyan's mother: grapes would be welcome.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Discusses post times. The weather has been 'absolutely beastly' and he has a cold, which gave him a nose-bleed this morning. Took a day off yesterday and lunched with the Frys; [Roger] Fry is very busy, having had to give an extra lecture last week, so Bob conveys his advice on house decoration. Need good painters, as [George?] Moore had trouble when he was having his Cambridge rooms done, due to the 'stupidity of the workmen'. Gives his aunt Meg Price's address. Thinks he is becoming 'more romantic' about her; wishes he had been with her to 'caress... and explain away [his] last cruel letter' in which he thoughtlessly exaggerated his 'regret at [his] fading days of singleness' [9/119]. She will certainly not come between him and his friends, as she has 'quite enough of their own intellectual qualities to be their friend in the same way' he is. Has usually gone abroad alone and not allowed his 'sensations to be interfered with by those of others'; will probably enjoy going to Greece more with her than with 'people like Daniel and Mayor'. Attempts to explain his feelings in detail. Will be able to talk freely to his friends after his marriage, though 'it is true that men do talk more obscenely, and more blasphemously, than they ever quite dare to talk before women' and he thinks that this difference is right. Should not have written 'so carelessly' and caused her pain. Has written to her uncle saying he and she should fix the date. Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies came for tea last Sunday; he is probably going to the Lizard at Easter; he said his brother [Arthur?] and his wife went to Land's End for his honeymoon which was 'very satisfactory', but that Savernake near Salisbury plain was the 'best place conceivable', with 'every kind of scenery' only an hour from London. He says it has a good inn; Bob may look on his way to Cornwall. Seatoller [in Borrowdale] is very nice too, but much further away. Has not yet heard from Daniel how Sanger is; will tell Bessie [about Sanger's unhappy love affair] when he sees her; she guessed correctly that the woman was Dora. He and Fry still think it would have been best for them to marry, but that now seems unlikely; her treatment of him is 'not through heartlessness exactly... but owing to circumstances, and also to her rather unusual temperament'. Has done some work, and has been re-reading Flaubert's letters; feels more in sympathy with him than any other modern writer. His mother says Charles and George are thinking of giving Bessie a 'very pretty sort of box to keep music in'; wishes they would give them the flying trunk or carpet Bessie mentioned. They will have to content themselves with meeting in dreams, though it seems [Empedocle] Gaglio has a dream-carpet which will take him into Bessie's brain; still, he does not have a lock of her hair so Bob has a start.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Sorry to hear about Bessie's cold; hopes it has now gone. Has discovered some 'wonderful woodland places in the valley... the woods here are quite endless'. Impatiently waiting for spring; is usually in Italy in February and March. She should read Flaubert's letters; he expresses several things Bob feels but is 'too lazy' or lacks the power to explain. Is having difficulty getting into the right frame of mind to work, but thinks he has made his play better by his alterations. Has been reading some Heine and [Goethe's] "Faust" in German, but cannot really spare enough time for it. Much interested in the 'domestic politics' Bessie mentions, and would like to meet some more of her half-sisters; expects he will when he comes to the Netherlands soon. Asks her to thank her uncle for his kind letter; would like to leave the question of the post-marriage celebrations to her and her father; is always 'rather afraid of formal speeches and ceremonies' but would not object if they wanted it. Wonders how she likes "Wuthering Heights"; for him 'crude as it is in some ways... it beats almost all English novels'. Is pleased that [Alfred] Enticknap has got a permanent place at a nearby house, though he will still be able to do some work for him and even the Frys, who say he is a 'firstclass gardener'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Has been in town since Monday, and is taking the next train back to Dorking. Comments on her last letter, and their love. Will probably go to Cornwall on Wednesday 11th and stay a week. Went to Roger [Fry]'s lecture yesterday; Helen has had a slight attack of pleurisy and is unwell. Went with his mother to hear Isaye [sic: Eugène Ysaÿe] last Monday. The music box [which Charles and George intend as a wedding present] looks pretty; describes it and gives a sketch and section, with measurements; she must decide and he will tell George. Booa [Mary Prestwich] asks if he would like a small travelling clock or piece of silver as a present from the servants; she thinks the clock and he tends to agree; it is very kind of them and he will value it 'far more than its mere worth'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Likes the sketch of Bessie's wedding costume; quite Watteau-esque as she says. He is 'no judge of silks' but the piece she sends looks good; encloses samples of cloth for his trousers and for a tweed suit and asks her opinion. Will probably stay in Cornwall till next Wednesday; [George] Moore and MacCarthy are the only others there at the moment; [G.H.?] Hardy left yesterday, and he hopes both 'Llewelyn Davieses' [Crompton and Theodore?] are coming tomorrow. Describes the place; Moore 'played a lot and sang yesterday after tea', then they played cards and talked. Is reading James's "Daisy Miller", which is 'charming'. Discussion of the music box; has written to his mother to suggest having the partitions taken out; it is from both George and Charles. Expects it would be best to invite the consul [Henry Turing, at Rotterdam, to the wedding celebration]; he may not come. Did not mean that Sir Henry [Howard] would arrange all the legal marriage business, but he offered to arrange the ceremony and invitation of the consul; expects he could do this most easily but it would not matter if they or her uncle should arrange it. Will write to Sir Henry or Turing when he hears from her uncle, though is not sure what to say. Would prefer to invite Sir Henry to the wedding, especially as Bob's father and mother are coming, feels he should ask his parents what they think. Sir Henry is a relation, and has 'shown great good-will and readiness'.

Does not see why Bessie should cut herself off completely from her Dutch musical friends; she will 'often be in Holland', and will 'surely stay at Mein's [sic: Mien Rontgen's] in Amsterdam'; in England, she will of course have 'complete freedom to make her own friends' and must keep up and develop her own talents as much as she can; he will enjoy hearing her play, but also going to hear others and getting to know her friends, but that does not mean she should not have independence of interests and friendships. Thinks that women 'have not enough respect for their own intellectual lives' and give it up too easily on marriage, through their husband's fault or their own; she should 'quite seriously consider going to settle in Berlin for 5 or 6 months' for her music. Mrs [Helen] Fry's marriage has made her more of a painter. Her pleurisy is better now; thinks Bessie exaggerates the importance of her cigarette smoking, and that any ill effects it does have are balanced by the help it gives her to create art. Has never 'been in danger of being in love' with Helen Fry, but always found her 'more interesting and amusing than any woman [he] ever met... with a completely original personality', and would not think of criticising such a person's habits but would assume they are 'best suited to their temperament'; in the same way, Moore probably 'drinks more whisky than is good for his health, and smokes too much too', but he would not criticise him. Bessie is also 'an original person' with a 'personal genius of [her] own', but in addition he loves her; has never felt the same about any other woman.

Continues the letter next day. Has finished "Daisy Miller"; and is doing some German, getting on better than he thought he would. Part of the reason for saying he would 'never learn German' was an 'exaggerated idea of the difficulty', but more because he thought, and still thinks, it will be less of a 'literary education' than other languages; is chiefly learning it for Goethe, though being able to read German scholarship will be useful. Has read Coleridge's translation of "Wallenstein", which Schiller himself claimed was as good as the original; thinks English and [Ancient] Greek lyric poetry is better than the German he has read. Very sorry about Lula [Julius Röntgen]; asks if it [his illness] will do more than postpone him going to Berlin. Has heard from Daniel that Sanger is 'getting on quite well'; hopes he will return from Greece 'quite himself again'. Will be nice for Bessie to see the Joneses [Herbert and Alice] again; he has 'become a little parsonic perhaps' but very nice; has seen little of him for the last few years. Bessie should certainly get [Stevenson's] "Suicide Club" for Jan [Hubrecht]; will pay half towards it. Will certainly come before Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] returns. Has grown 'such a beard, finer than Moore's and McCarthy's, though they have grown their's for weeks'. Describes their daily routine. Is encouraged that Moore likes several recent poems he himself was doubtful about; is copying out the play and will show him today or tomorrow. The Davieses are coming this afternoon. Signs off with a doggerel verse.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Bessie should not mind her feeling [that a recent musical occasion would not have felt the same with Bob there]; he would not want her to be at [an Apostle's] Society discussion, as she would be 'a little out of her element', and he will likewise never be musically minded' however many concerts he go to; though he will want to 'know and try to sympathise with' her musical friends as she will 'to a far greater extent and more easily' with his friends. She is ''"Apostolic" in... intellect and Nature', though she cannot become a brother, whereas he could never be thought of as an 'Embryo' in music, however much trouble she took with him. However, does enjoy music, such as the Isaye [sic: Ysaÿe] concert last Monday, who played Schubert and Beethoven, and the song recital by [Blanche] Marchesi on Tuesday; she sang some melancholy songs by [Adolf] Jensen, and part of César Franck's "Ruth". Has been reading Heine's songs with a translation, and likes them, but not as much as those by Goethe, which seem as great, and in the same sort of way' as those by Shakespeare and Sappho. Mrs [Helen] Fry is still not well; has lent her 'lots of novels, which she reads very fast'; she sends Bessie her love. Still thinks the Lakes will be best for their honeymoon; asks advice on the trousers he should get for the wedding day. Lists some books he owns; Sophie [Wicksteed] is giving them a complete Carlyle; Bessie should keep any book that has meaning for her. The Insleys told him the correct spelling of his address was 'Westcot', but supposes he should follow modern fashion. Has read some more of the new poems [Thomas Sturge] Moore lent to Binyon; one 'about the dead Don Juan' is very original. Has not done much work recently; hopes to get the first two acts finished before going abroad. Is going to stay with the Holman Hunts before going to Cornwall; Hunt's 'painting is now no good' but he is charming and 'full of reminiscences of Rossetti, Millais and the rest'. Asks if she knows of the Dutch poet Piet Paaltjens. Read a poem of Heine in which he compared his wife to 'Schlangen' [snakes] and himself to Laocoon; wishes Bessie 'would come swimming over the sea, like the snakes in Virgil'. Fears he cannot get her [magic] carpet at 'Cardinal and Harvards; it is too oriental even for them'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Hopes Julian has reached Taormina by now and is enjoying Sicily, though fears the almond blossom may be over. Has just heard from Nicky [Mariano] that she and B.B. [Bernard Berenson] may go to Zürich at the end of March to see the Lombard exhibition, but will definitely be back by 15 April. Sure they would like to see Julian, and would probably ask him to stay at I Tatti if he wrote to Nicky. All well here: Bessie likes Mrs Alexieff and gets on quite well with her secretary. He himself is 'fairly all right, though sometimes a little out of sorts'. Hopes Julian will like Sicily as much as Goethe did; he was afraid to go to Greece because of brigands, so went to Sicily and 'made up his mind' it must be just like Greece. Tells Julian to ask his friend [Daphne Phelps] whether she is related to his own old friend T[homas] T[ettrell] Phelps, whom he has not seen for years. Expects Julian has been to the Isola Bella, which used to belong to Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; he used to go and bathe there with Roger and Helen Fry. Roger painted a picture of Mount Etna seen through the Greek theatre, which Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] had in his rooms. Hopes Julian's car is 'behaving itself'. Bessie will write soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has to go to meet [Desmond] MacCarthy soon and may not finish letter in time for the post; hope matters [regarding the wedding] have cleared up. Glad it is settled about Turing; expect her uncle will arrange about the banns and talk to the Burgermaster [sic]. Saw the Frys today; is going with them to Roundhurst next Monday, to stay a night at the farm where he would like to spend the first days of their honeymoon; the nightingales will be 'wonderful', there are none in the North, and 'a honeymoon without nightingales would never do'. Fry thinks he should not miss the [Apostles'] dinner but they can discuss this. Some of his friends have 'combined' to give them the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry, which Bessie has seen; he likes it very much as a work of art; also as an instrument, though not perhaps as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch; thinks it a 'splendid present'. [Bernard] Berenson is the 'chief contributor'; will send her the list of the contributors, about twenty of them, soon.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst,. - Has opened and looked at Trevelyan's Harunobu print and congratulates him on the purchase. Fry will make Berenson envious when they meet, as Mrs [Mary] Costelloe came over to Roundhurst the other day: it was a struggle for her to conceal her feelings. Went to Friday's Hill [home of the Pearsall Smiths] yesterday. No fresh news from Roehampton [of Helen Fry]: sometimes it seems impossible to go on. Will leave on Thursday with much regret as the house and Goldie [Dickinson] have made life bearable; thinks he will go to 12 Pembroke Square, Mrs Sickert's house. He and Goldie slept out in Trevelyan's field two nights ago.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear they are all well; Caroline sends love; a 'cuckoo for ever calling here' makes him think of 'the dear little boy' [Paul] and of 'Will Shakespeare'. They have just finished Hogg [his life of Shelley], and thinks more of Hogg 'in his queer way' than ever; has been reading a Macmillan edition of Shelley: 'What a poet!'. Has read [Roger] Fry's article in the Burlington Magazine, and paid a second visit to the illuminated manuscripts [exhibition at the Burlington Fine Arts Club] yesterday before leaving London; has also looked through the British Museum facsimiles here and at Grosvenor Crescent. Hopes Fry's wife will 'go on satisfactorily'. The 'Doctorate business' [his forthcoming honorary degree at Cambridge] is 'very plain sailing': Lord Halsbury, Lord Rayleigh, and Sir James Ramsey will also be staying at [Trinity College] Lodge; they lunch at [Gonville &] Caius, whose Master [Ernest Roberts] is Vice Chancellor. Others receiving honorary degrees are: the Duke of Northumberland; Admiral Sir John Fisher; Charles Parsons; Sir James Ramsay; Sir W[illiam] Crookes; Professor Lamb; Professor Marshall; Asquith; Lord Halsbury; Sir Hubert Herkomer; Sir Andrew Noble; Rudyard Kipling; Professor Living; they will 'advance on the Senate House...like the English at Trafalgar'. in two columns. Is looking forward to dinner in the hall at Trinity. Went to Harrow on Tuesday and will tell Robert about it and about the 'Cacciola affair'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8 Grosvenor Crescent, London S.W. - Has come to London to be nearer to Bessie in her 'difficulties'; his train was late so his parents were out when he arrived, but will talk to them later. Does not think they will yet have had a letter from her. 'Grieved' she reproaches herself for writing as she did [about her uncle's reaction to the idea of inviting Sir Henry Howard]; does not think he was wrong to tell his father but understands why she might think he was. As for his mother's letter, he understands why Bessie has appealed directly to his father. His father has sent him a copy and he thinks it may hold out 'a hope of his coming' to the wedding after all. Thinks the best solution is for the Howards to be invited and his father come; is now anxious about how her uncle will take his mother's letter, which is meant to be conciliatory; her uncle has no right to be angry with her. His father is not offended; even less so than when he first learnt of the Grandmonts' possible reaction to Sir Henry being invited. Further discussion of the situation. Will come over earlier if she wants him to, otherwise will cross next Monday and stay in the same hotel. If this matter is settled, may go to Roundhurst with the Frys on Friday, where he wants to take her before the [Apostles'] dinner. Is glad she does not mind him going; it is not in Cambridge but London, where they could perhaps stop the night at a hotel. Will bring over her underclothes and the spectacles. Is sorry Alice Jones minded so much about the civil marriage; 'Church people in England are often very difficult on such matters, but Alice is 'evidently very nice, and very fond' of Bessie. Tells Bessie to get Dutch books with their [Alice and Herbert Jones's] present; would not have her 'unDutched for the world'. Glad his last letter gave her 'so much joy and confidence'.

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