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Trevelyan, Janet Penrose (1879–1956), author
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Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Was very glad that Robert went to the funeral; there is an 'immense gap' since [Sir George's sister] Margaret's 'vitality, and power of interest made one forget how long she had been very ill'. Charles and Mary went to Rounton [Grange] this morning; Janet, George, and their babies [Mary and Theodore]. A huge search-party was out for 'old Thompson', the farmer-shepherd at Harwood, who was nearly blind and got lost on 'Friday week, the first of the hot days'; Charles got fifty 'navvies from the water works' to join in; Harwood was eventually found drowned in Fallowlees Loch. It would not have been right to shoot Harwood moor, and the game were scattered over the county by the searchers; Sir George went shooting for the first time yesterday and did well; will shoot Catcherside next Monday. Has bought the twelve volumes of the "Yellow Book" in the original covers; asks if he has had a bargain. Glad that the Water Lane is being done to Robert and Elizabeth's satisfaction.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad Elizabeth is enjoying her visit and has seen the [Gilbert?] Murrays; is 'so fond of Mary'. Letters to G[eorge] and J[anet] should be sent to the Wards, staying at Villa Bonaventura, Cadenabbia, who will forward them on. The latest news of them is from Florence; they were 'very happy'. Has had 'such a nice note' from Miss [Mary?] Fletcher, and has asked Imogen to play, since they are coming [to Caroline's party]. Arrangements for meeting; including the concert they are going to together. Encloses an invitation to the party [?] in case Robert would like to ask [Henry] Previté; they should say if there is anyone else they would like to come. She and Sir George liked Mr Howells, and found Mrs Atherton amusing. Very glad Elizabeth found Mrs F [Helen Fry?] better, but it 'does not seem satisfactory'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - He and Bessie went over to the house yesterday with Mr [F. A.?] Richards, the architect, and Miss [Helen Margaret?] Waterfield, a 'garden specialist', to get ideas about the garden; they will probably have to do some planting and digging next month 'to make a beginning'. Work on the house had 'got on very fast', and the roof will be begun in two or three weeks; they hope this will be 'before the rains come'. Bessie is telling Sir George about the payments, which will be due earlier than Richards had thought. Before they go abroad, they will have to 'make arrangements for selling what stock is necessary for the rest'.

The weather has been 'very fine for some time', but is more unsettled now. Neville Lytton, the painter, is coming over today from Horsham. Wishes his mother could have seen Lytton's exhibition in London this summer; he 'is certainly among the most promising young artists nowadays', and Robert thinks some of his watercolours especially good. Does not care as much for some of his oils, but there is 'always something interesting in them too'; perhaps some of Lytton's admirers 'praise his work too highly', but Robert is sure he will 'do very well in the end'. He is a 'great friend of Fry' who is older and has 'helped him a great deal' with advice. [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is also coming to lunch today. Fry says he will come on the day of the Dolmetsch concert if he can; Mrs Fry, who 'has had scarlet fever very badly, is getting better, despite a severe attack of rheumatic fever'.

Bessie may well go abroad for about a week on the 29th, after the concert. They have not yet heard from her young friend Hylkia [Halbertsma] whether she can come abroad with them, but they hope she can: she 'would be a very good companion for Bessie, and she is a nice and clever girl'. They are looking forward to seeing Caroline next month in Dorking or London. Sends love to his father, and to G[eorge] and J[anet], whom he hears are at Wallington.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Hopes Elizabeth's search for a nurse goes well; recommends the "Morning Post" for advertisements. They have had a good time with George, Janet, and the children, who have been 'very much better' behaved. Asks if Elizabeth would like an Otterburn Tweed for a coat and skirt; originally enclosing samples of patterns for her to choose from. Gussie [Enticknap] 'looks very cheerful' and will go to Mrs Davidson's [lodgings for the gardeners] soon; Keith says 'he wands a good deal of looking after & "knows nothing of work"'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - She and Sir George are disappointed that Elizabeth is not coming, but she is right to go to her sister; hopes it will cheer Mien [after the death of her daughter Amanda], and sends her sympathy. Must arrange to meet on Elizabeth's return; she and Sir George go to London on 11 April, and go abroad in five weeks. Is planning an afternoon party for young people, both married and unmarried, and asks if Elizabeth could help with some music. Has had a letter from Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht], who does not think La Croix suited Elizabeth as well as Ravello; hopes she is well. Wonders where Robert and his friends [on G. E. Moore's reading party?] have gone; G[eorge] and J[anet] are walking in Cornwall until Tuesday; they then come to London and go at once abroad. Aunt Margaret has had influenza; Caroline and Sir George are pretty well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Very sad news about the nurse [Mrs Catt]; hopes Elizabeth will be able to find another as nice; asks if Mrs Catt has a home to go to for a chance of recovery. Good that Julian is so well. George came yesterday with 'a nice young Huxley', with whom he had walked 'over mountains from the Lakes 94 miles in 3 days'. The A[ndrew?] Langs are here, and Mrs Lang asks about Elizabeth; Mrs Pease and the Hunsfields are coming to lunch, and the Booths for the night; Janet and the children come tomorrow. Sending a brace of grouse; asks whether the last ones arrived. Lucky that Nurse Shephard can come; it will give Elizabeth time to find another nurse. Booa is very sorry [about Nurse Catt?]

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Glad that the Hardys [G. H. Hardy and his sister?] have arrived. Caroline mentioned La Croiz to the Arthur Elliots, as they are going to the Riviera at Easter, but could not tell them whether there were 'good drives' which is important as he is 'very lame'. The last days before [George and Janet's] wedding are most exciting; the Wards are 'wonderfully energetic' and their arrangements go well. Went to see the presents yesterday; there seemed to be almost as many as C[harles] and M[ary] had, though there were fewer presentations and large things. Janet had 'some very nice offerings from her girls, & many servants & poor people'; lots of books, silver, cheques; Janet's trousseau was 'nice and useful'. Hopes the weather at Oxford will be good. Caroline, Sir George and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going down before the special train to be at the registry. She and Sir George have not been well; thinks Sir George was doing too much, so he is resting. The Duke of Cambridge has died, so there will be no question of going to Court tomorrow; is glad as it 'seemed so inappropriate'. Has a note from [Bramine Hubrecht at] Taormina saying that the things have been sent; hopes they will arrive soon. Hopes the concert went well. The H[enry] Y[ates] T[hompson]s 'would be sorry not to be able to stop'. They [the Liberals] have won another [by] election, and 'the Gov[ernment] are in a poor way'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Has been unwell and 'laid up', but is now better. [George and Janet's] wedding seems very near; wishes Elizabeth and Robert could be there. George is busy going over his book ["England Under The Stuarts"] with [Charles] Oman, and she thinks all but the last chapter will be finished before the wedding; he is taking a few days in the country from tomorrow. Charlie was 'triumphantly returned' for the North[umberland] C[ounty] C[ouncil] but looks tired; worries about him taking on more work. Mary looks very happy. Glad Elizabeth saw her 'pretty friend [sic] Mrs Salamon' [Jeanne Salamonson Asser] and had some music; Robert also writes that the Hardys [G. H. Hardy and his sister?] have come. Hopes Elizabeth gets to visit the Netherlands before returning to England. Looking forward to getting the things from Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]; hopes there is a good reason for their sale at Taormina. Elizabeth must come to stay at Welcombe while Robert goes to his friends [G E Moore's reading party] if they are back in England by then. Sir George is reading newspapers each morning at the British Museum, which 'he hates doing'; he will finish this week. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is 'very beaming over George', and all [wedding] arrangements are going well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Hears that snow has fallen on some parts of the Riviera, and wonders whether Elizabeth and Robert have seen any. [George and Janet's] wedding is near, and the arrangements all seem to be made; she, Sir George, Charles, M[ary] and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going early and will be at the Registry Office; the others are coming by a special train and will go to the college [Somerville?]; some people think the arrangements 'very queer' and others 'are enthusiastic about the novel kind of marriage'. She herself thinks it will be nice, and wishes Elizabeth and Robert could be there. George and Janet are going to a farm house in Surrey where the Wards used to spend their summers for ten days, and will then go abroad after having seen the furniture put into their house. Wonders when Elizabeth and Robert will return and whether the 'road [to their new house] business will be settled'; supposes they will want the building to begin as soon as possible. The clergy made 'most violent efforts against the progressives' in the London County Council election, but made little difference to the numbers. No one is sure whether there will be a general election soon; the government is 'absolutely discredited' and many of their own party are talking 'openly against them'. Emily Hobhouse has been to tea with her, having just returned from the Transvaal; Caroline is glad that she is to have a testimonial given her. They are going to Welcombe for about a fortnight on 29 March, then will return to London before they go abroad at Whitsun. Sir George is well, and 'reading busily for Vol IV [of "The American Revolution"].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sure Elizabeth's 'outing' will do her good and she will go back 'fresh' to Julian. Mary thinks he is doing well. Hopes Mrs Catt [the nurse] will return 'well & cheerful'. Robert's letter was cheerful; is amused that he has 'been induced to run in a Hunt', even though he says they are 'not so energetic as George's party'; must have been pleasant from the names he mentioned. Hopes Elizabeth found the Waterfields well; asks if she saw the Northbournes, and is not sure whether they have yet come north. Mary is sending her children to Wallington around 13 July and coming herself around the 22nd; Charlie probably will come at the beginning of August. George and Janet will not come till September

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Nice to hear of 'sunshine and flowers' from Elizabeth, as it is still very wintry here. Is glad to spend some time in London, see friends, and feel 'in the centre of things'. Charles, M[ary], G[eorge] and J[anet] often visit, and are all cheerful. George and Janet's wedding is fixed for 19 March; the Wards have taken a house at Oxford for a week for it, it is 'an original business' and she hopes it will satisfy everyone 'except the orthodox!'. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club, and seen the Secretary, who says its future will be 'settled next month' but she thinks it will carried on. Interested by Elizabeth's account of Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]'s 'entertainment', and thinks it will be charming as 'the Italians have an artistic strain through all their vulgarity'. Does not think pipes [?] and jam will be useful [for bazaars], but would be glad if Madame Grandmont could send her five pounds worth of Taormina [embroidery and lace] work. Glad to hear the Frys are happier; has been very sorry for Roger Fry. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will get the question of the road [to the house they are having built at Leith Hill] settled soon; annoying to have lost the winter for building. Wonders what Bob is writing; hopes their translation work is progressing. Politics very interesting, but she thinks the Government will hold on. Has no sympathy for either side in the [Russo-Japanese] War, and wishes 'they could both be beaten'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Found C[harles] and M[ary] settled at North Street, a 'bright little house' which they have made pretty, furnishing it 'economically' and suitably for a small space; their [wedding] presents looked nice, and they have an excellent book collection. Mary looks very contented, and 'Charlie's hair is curling as it has not done for a long time!'. One of the two small drawing-rooms has two pianos in; if they play them together their neighbours will think it noisy, but 'they are humble folk, & the children who swam in Westminster will come & listen in the street!'. George looks as if he needs a holiday; Caroline is glad the wedding is not far away, on 17 March. Janet looks very happy and says she is busy with her trousseau. Dorothy has returned and said to be 'much better for her journey'. Saw the H[enry] Y[ates] Thompsons yesterday; they start for Sicily tomorrow; Caroline will ask Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] to let them see her garden. Asks whether Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht] would let them call on her; thinks she would like Dolly. Harry is telling people that Caroline and Sir George like their new daughters-in-law, but will not say 'either of them come up to Elizabeth in character or walking!'. Glad he has the right impression, though of course they will all have a 'separate place' in their hearts; Mary is good, sensible, and suits Charles, but 'needs a little polishing'.

If there are things at La Croix which would be suitable for a bazaar at Stratford, asks if Elizabeth could buy her two pounds worth; she can send them by post if she likes. Going today to see if they can find out about Aunt Margaret [Holland]'s health; fears it is her 'old trouble, clots'. Meta [Smith?] has reached Egypt; is said to be better. Very glad life at La Croix suits Robert's work. Caroline has found a cabinet at Stratford which she thinks will suit their new house; asks whether the work on that has begun yet.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking :- The weather has deteriorated recently and it is 'alternatively rainy and sultry'. Saw George briefly in London yesterday; he seemed 'very well and cheerful', except that he and Janet are 'distressed' about the health of her uncle [William Thomas Arnold], which Robert's father has 'doubtless' heard of. George was 'beginning the last chapter of his history [England Under the Stuarts].

Bessie is well; her friend Miss [Laetitia] Ede is visiting for a few days, 'having just passed her final medical examination'. They have 'signed the agreement with the V[aughan] Williamses [for the lease of land on which to build a house]' but there are still delays, since both their and the Vaughan Williamses' architects think they should 'try to get a cheaper tender from other builders'; this is 'very tiresome', but at least it does not seem to be the Vaughan Williamses' fault this time, and Robert and Elizabeth will be sure they are getting their 'full money's worth'. Does not expect the delays will be longer than a few weeks, so the roof should still be on before Christmas and they should be able to move in next spring.

Saw Murray's translation of Hippolytus acted in London yesterday [at the Lyric Theatre, produced by Harley Granville-Barker], but thought it so poor a performance that he 'could not stay till the end. No one could act well, or even make themselves heard properly, though there was plenty of ranting, and the beautiful choruses were drowned out in an intolerably affected and ineffective manner'. The play is 'very fine... and well suited for the modern style, and the translation has many unusual merits': it is a 'great pity that these abortive efforts should be made, as it only makes the intelligent public more and more sceptical as to the possibility of acting poetical drama finely, and yet it is perfectly possible, if only they would go about it in the right way'. At least they should not use 'quite incompetent actors'. Yet some papers have said it was 'very successful'.

They both send love to Robert's father and mother; Bessie will write soon.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Robert gave lots of news about Elizabeth in his letter; interesting that she is translating again; asks whether she finished the novel she was working on last year. There must be a great deal of Dutch literature 'unknown to other nations' as the language is rarely learnt. The poem must be curious; asks whether the language differs much from modern Dutch; it dates from a 'great time in the countrie's [sic] history]. She and Sir George have been seeing neighbours and going into town she has been to London several times. There are great floods: 'the Avon is out all down the valley'. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will continue to like La Croix [-Valmer?]. They are feeling happier about politics; Chamberlain is 'not gaining ground' and the Government 'make a most wretched show' in the House of Commons. They are expecting H[enry] James, Miss [Lily] Noble, Mrs [Alice Stopford] Green and Sir [Alfred] Lyall for a couple of days tomorrow, and go up to London on the 12th. North Street [Charles and Mary's London house] has been 'started', with 'no drawbacks', and she looks forward to seeing it; Cheyne Gardens [George and Janet's London house] is also progressing, and Janet is very pleased with it. The "Independent [Review]" for February is good, and much attention is being paid to it; hopes it is 'establishing itself'. Has subscribed again to Rolandi [the foreign language bookseller and library], so asks Elizabeth to let her know if she hears of any good French books. Notes that 'the modern world seems to find it necessary to have a millionaire for hero!'. Asks if Elizabeth has anyone to accompany her violin playing. Aunt Margaret [Holland] is still too ill for visitors, and does not even have letters read to her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Grand Hotel, La Croix, par Gassin (Var) :- Has not yet answered her last letter, having written to his father instead; is glad to hear from her letter to Bessie which arrived today that he, George, and Charles are well. His mother's account of North Street [Charles and Molly's new marital home] much 'interested and amused' them. Hopes all will go well at Oxford [for George and Janet's wedding]; wonders if George will wear a frock coat, but supposes not 'as he will not wear a topper presumably'.

He and Bessie are both well and 'enjoying very fine weather'; he is getting on all right with his work, finishing a play he began last year but put aside having 'got into difficulties'. Now he thinks he knows 'how it should go'. Is going to review Sturge Moore's poems for George, but not until he leaves here, as time spent on his own work here is too valuable; nevertheless, has promised George he will have it ready for the May number [of the Independent Review]. Bessie is getting on 'slowly' with her translation, but it is 'very difficult work, and can't be done quickly'. They have just heard from Mrs Cacciola, who asks several questions which Robert cannot answer: about '"Andrew Johnstone (Charlotte's husband)"', and whether '"Mr Frank Snowball... is a man as honourable and capable in business as his father Joseph Snowball was"' - he was apparently a '"highly esteemed friend"' of Mrs Cacciola's mother. Robert thought his mother would probably know these people, but that as he does not know why Mrs Cacciola is making these enquiries, his turning to her 'had better been in confidence', since Mrs Cacciola could always have asked her directly. In the mean time is writing that he does not know but will find out; since Mrs Cacciola 'has so few friends in England' he feels he should do so.

Asks his mother to thank his father for her letter, and tell him Robert will write soon. Hopes the 'literary dinner went off well'. Bessie will write soon; they both send love. Decisions about their house are now 'more or less settled', though the 'road question' is still not yet quite agreed; expects they may need to spend something on it themselves 'if no one else will, possibly one or two hundred pounds'. They are leaving it to their solicitors to settle. Their friends the Hardys [G H Hardy and his sister?] have not yet come, which is a disappointment.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - Agrees with what Bob says about the 'present situation', but is very worried that 'the Greeks and Servians will [emphasized] behave foolishly and brutally', making 'the Turkish difficulty' very great. Venizelos [the Greek Prime Minister] is 'sensible, but his Greeks are maddened by the idea of leaving their "brothers" in Thrace under Bulgarian rule'. Has written to [Aubrey?] Herbert and encloses his reply, which 'amounts to nothing' since Herbert's information was 'apparently about Prizrend [Prizren] not Kumanovo [Komanovo]': there was only one Servian [Serbian] division at Prizrend and 'hardly more than a big skirmish'; expects there were no Turks there, and the Servians themselves always poke of it as against Albanians. Does not think he should try to write a 'contemporary history', as he knows nothing of the Balkans and their languages, and 'the Balkan peoples all lie like [the] Devil'. Janet is well again. Encloses a "Contemporary Review" article.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - Very glad that Bob likes "The [Life of John] Bright", and understands 'both the difficulties and the possibilities of the task'; Bob is right that 'one never gets quite inside Garibaldi': doubts he 'was ever quite inside himself'. Janet is recovering steadily; she has a masseuse for her back, but they hope she will be better in a week; she 'injured a muscle jumping over a flower-bed!' so Bob must tell Bessie not to do that. Much appreciates [Gordon] Bottomley's approval of "...Bright". Will soon send some long and 'not very easily legible' letters about his travels, since Bessie would like to see them; is currently using them to write articles for the "Nation" and "Contemporary".

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Had a good account of Elizabeth and the baby from Mary in a telephone call last night. She and Sir George look forward to seeing Robert tomorrow, and she will come to visit on Thursday if Elizabeth feels well enough. Reassures Elizabeth about not being able to nurse [breastfeed] the baby; George 'was a bottle baby' and did very well, and she knows Mrs Catt will be very careful. Sir George seems better for the move to London. Janet visited yesterday evening; Caroline hopes to see the children today. The Government 'seem to have extricated themselves from their difficulties for a time'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for the [Homeric Hymn to] "Demeter" [Bob's translation in this year's"From the Shiffolds"], which he very much enjoyed, especially as it was new to him. Bob always sends 'these lovely reminders' of himself at Christmas. Janet can now hardly get around alone, due to the 'hardening of her arteries', which destroys her balance; however she 'keeps cheerful' though reduced to a 'lower level of life'. Is going to Hallington for a fortnight; Janet will stay with friends. Asks Bob to let them know if he can visit them next term; they would 'love to see him again'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W.1. - Is not sure of Bob's address, so will write one letter to be forwarded on. Glad they liked "Garibaldi III" ["Garibaldi and the Making of Italy"], and is obliged for the corrections. Saw Will A. F. [Arnold Forster] as he passed through London on his 'belated way out through London on his belated way out to Italy'; Will 'suffers badly from the A.T. [Artistic Temperament' in terms of making arrangements and so on; he finished his 'big Malvern picture' and portrait of Janet were finished the day before he sailed, and they have been sent to the New Eng[lish] Art Club show. Glad that Bob is with [Catherine and Lascelles] Abercrombie. The 'Tripoli horrors and the whole folly of the [Italo-Turkish] war, and George will does not think he will have the 'heart' to go to Italy for a long time; lacks heart for "English Songs of Italian Freeman", which Bob has read the preface to, and which George is due to bring out soon, nor even for "Garibaldi". Is 'delighted to hear about the Stadtholder [Julian]'s earliest remarks.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for his 'beautiful' translations [in this year's "From the Shiffolds"]: the "Moretum" 'takes one into the classical peasant's life with an amused intimacy', but the Homeric "Hymn to Pan" is best in terms of poetry. Has read it several times, and will take it to Hallington; they are going there on Wednesday for Christmas, with 'all the grandchildren'. Humphry will see it there. Wishes Bob and his family a happy Christmas and New Year.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - Thanks Bob for his writing, and for going to Swanage [due to the fatal illness of George and Janet's son Theo]; sorry this journey was 'in vain'. Did not write or wire to Bob as he knew he would have left the reading party for Will [Arnold Forster]'s and did not know where that was. [Theo's death] is a 'very great blow indeed' to George and Janet, but Bob and Bessie's courage at that which reduced them 'from the state of having offspring to the state of having none at all' [the death of their son Paul] is an 'example'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - It is very kind of Trevelyan to say he will send Morra Virginia [Woolf's] new book ["The Years"]; he has promised to review it by the middle of May. Met Trevelyan's brother George here recently and was amused by the resemblances and differences between them. George's wife [Janet] seemed 'very pleasant', and B.B. is revising his first thoughts about her. Alberti is here. Mary's health is up and down but she does not 'look at all badly'. Will return home when B.B. and Nicky [Mariano] start for the Aegean.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very cold, and the 'warmest thing to do' is to write to Robert at Ravello. Must have been delightful living 'in sight of Florence' [staying with Bernard Berenson at Settignano]. Sends love to Elizabeth; hopes she will be well on the journey to Ravello and have good weather. George is here for Christmas, and will then join Janet at Stocks; Charles and Mary return this evening from Mary's grandfather [Lowthian Bell]'s funeral. He was eighty nine, and 'very active in business' almost up to his death; awful weather for a funeral; considers the number of people who 'have caught their deaths at funerals'. [John] Morley has made a 'fine address enough' at the opening of a free library [in Plumstead], though this is now 'a most hackneyed occasion' thanks to [Andrew] Carnegie. Sir George himself is to open 'the [underlined, due to controversy] library' at Stratford on Avon; they have done well to choose someone 'accustomed to steer amidst quicksands'. They are going to Welcombe on Tuesday next 'in patriarchal fashion, with a through carriage for [their] whole establishment'. They like their Burne-Jones ["Idleness and the Pilgrim of Love"?] more and more, and will bring it to London; Sir George likes it best of their pictures apart from the Francia. He and Caroline are 'rather proud' of having got such 'sweet pictures' for a third of what a 'Road Magnate pays for a doubtful Romney'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Very sorry to hear that Professor [Ambrosius] Hubrecht is so unwell; it sounds like a 'real breakdown' and must be very distressing for his wife, though she is 'calm & capable'; fears the 'excitement' in the Netherlands cannot be good for him. Very good of Elizabeth to take in 'these poor girls'; hopes the other [servants?] will be 'pleasant and helpful'. George and Janet are going to London for the winter soon; George is busy writing 'articles for America'. Glad that Charlie and his friends are thinking 'of what is to be done in the future & not harping on the past'; he is at home for a while but seems over-tired; they have a 'houseful of friends' and Mary 'is on the sofa in her room again'. Very glad that the Röntgens have got home again; wishes 'Miss Weisse had been kept!'; supposes Mr [Donald] Tovey will be going to Edinburgh soon. Asks if Mr Hubrecht thought the accounts of the destruction of Liège had been exaggerated. Asks if Elizabeth will want to go often to London in the winter. They will try to let Gros[venor] Cr[escemt] next season, and will definitely stay at Wallington until Christmas. Mary does not know what to do with the children, due to differing advice from the doctors; asks whether Littlehampton is a good resort, and what Elizabeth is thinking of doing with Julian in November. Would gladly pay the expense of bringing him to Wallington if he does not go to the sea: 'We must all think of expense now'. Does not think people here are feeling the effects of the war much; no one has enlisted, as 'all the young men have emigrated recently'. The farmers are doing well and the pits busy, while Elswick and other firms on the Tyne are 'working double tides'. The pinch will come though.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that the work [on the new house] is going on 'so steadily and quickly' and that Miss Waterfield [artist and horticulturalist, sister of Aubrey Waterfield] likes the site and view so much. He and Caroline are hosting 'an immense young dinner party today': George, Janet, and Dorothy Howard from Wallington; Charles and Mary, [Francis Dyke] Acland, Hilton Young and Gertrude Bell from Cambo. Wishes Elizabeth could 'carry out her kind wish about old Mrs Thompson of Harwood [see 46/99]'. Has written to instruct the second five hundred pounds to be paid; gives advice not to sell stock in the last ten days of the quarter.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - The wedding [between George and Janet Trevelyan] is over, and now the family is 'all married'; wishes Robert and Elizabeth had been there as it was a nice, well arranged occasion. She, Sir George, and Booa [Mary Prestwich] arrived by train in Oxford just in time for the Registry, which was 'in a shabby little first floor room', made nice with 'carpet & flowers' but much inferior to the Hague; description of the short ceremony there, with only the 'nearest relations' and some of George's friends. They then went to [Manchester] College to meet the friends who had just arrived by special train from London. The chapel is 'extremely pretty, with lovely Burne-Jones windows'. Order of service originally enclosed; describes the address, in which 'there was nothing the least doctrinal, but it was very high toned & 'ethical'". Many guests, including Meggy [Price], Annie [Philips], Harry Greg, 'a number of Wards & Arnolds & Croppers', the 'H.Y.T.s' [Harry Yates Thompson and his wife], 'the Bell connection, & the Stanleys in numbers'. Also Mrs [Alice] Green, Henry James, 'Ritchies, Freshfields, Sidgwicks, Mr [Hugh?] Clifford, the Holman Hunts, Russells, Muggins Runcimans', many Oxford people and 'an array of George's friends'.

They then went into the library, a 'fine room with beautiful woodwork, & painted windows, & a statue of Dr [James] Martineau' for tea, took the special train back and were in London by 6 pm. Sir George was unwell with a bad cold for two days before, but got through; it was a warm day and he does not seem worse this morning. George and Janet went to 'a quiet place in Surrey' for a few days then on to Cornwall; will then return to London to 'put their house in order & go abroad'. Describes Janet's wedding dress and travelling dress.

Received the box of things from Taormina yesterday [see 11/93]; 'very nice, & just suitable for a bazaar'; will write and thank Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht] for ordering them. Sir George sends love, and thanks for Robert's last letter; he is reading Lord Acton's letters 'with amusement and interest', having had to stop work for a while; she thinks 'working too long at the B.M. [British Museum] made him ill' and is 'sure it is full of germs'. Charles and Mary were 'much to the front' at the wedding, and Mary looked 'magnificent'; dined with them last week in North Street, where everything is arranged nicely. Supposes Robert and Elizabeth will return to lots of business about the new house and hopes it goes well: 'the old judge [Sir Roland Vaughan Williams] has had plenty more time to think it over'. Sir John Swinburne's engagement has been broken off. Hester Lyttelton and Victoria Buxton are both going to be married.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Stella Maris Nursing Home, Trumpington Road, Cambridge. - Bessie will have heard from Catherine [Abercrombie] that Dr Noble thinks he should go for a few weeks into a nursing home to 'rest and be overhauled'. Is no worse, and in fact thinks he is 'definitely better', and he 'quite enjoyed the [Apostles'] dinner', but the doctor examined him 'very carefully' and thinks he needs the rest. Dr Noble is a 'nice quiet sensible man'; Bob thinks Dr Holloway and Dr Bluth would approve of him. Is very sorry to miss the St Matthew Passion and all the Busch [Quartet] concerts. It will not be long before they are 'both at home again together'. Janet seems 'remarkably well and cheerful'. Has to stop as he has several letters to write; hopes Bessie's cure is going well.

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