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Gibson, Wilfrid Wilson (1878-1962) poet
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Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Ryton, Dymock; addressed to The Shiffolds, forwarded c/o Mr Llewellyn Esquire, Underhill, Chyngton Rd, Seaford. - Thinks the dates Trevelyan suggests are suitable, but since Catherine and Gibson arrive on Monday they will discuss it then. David has been badly bitten by a dog, which fortunately was not rabid. Hopes Julian is doing well 'from his change'. They had a good week in Anglesey in September.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Thanks Bob for the book, which he will read with interest 'as the incident has always had a romantic attraction' for him; will send it back when Bob returns. Hopes the '(Georgian) poets abroad [Bob, Lascelles Abercrombie and Wilfrid Gibson] will have a good time'. Will send his essays ["Clio, a Muse and Other Essays"] to the Shiffolds; Bessie can keep it or send it out to Bob. Wrote to the "Times" about the "Sty Head" [see 13/230 and 14/87]; they are 'backing us [the campaigners against a road being built over the pass] up' as is the "Spectator", but it is 'a standing and permanent menace' and vigilance is needed. Hopes Julian will get a 'nice nurse'.

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

Greenway, Yaverland, Sandown, Isle of Wight. - Thanks Bob for the 'pamphlet of poems" [this year's "From the Shiffolds"] which has 'followed' him to their new home; they moved here last April so that he and his wife could 'indulge [their] passion for the sea' and 'enjoy the "simple pleasure"' Bob writes so eloquently about, and their grandson could 'have a handy beach to play on'. Has read Bob's poems with 'much pleasure', particularly "To Ursula Wood"; appreciates especially the 'intimate nature' of much of Bob's new work, which 'conveys so skilfully [his] personal reactions to existence in these troubled times'. Encloses a selection from his own poetry, chosen by his friend Charles Williams shortly before his death ["Solway Ford and Other Poems"].

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

East Hendred, Wantage, Berkshire. - Thanks Bob for the 'delightful pamphlet of poems" ["From the Shiffolds"]: since he shares with Bob a 'grandfather's fellow-feeling' he has read them with 'especial interest'. The poem about spectacles also appealed, since he remembers so well getting his first pair of glasses as a boy, and discovering 'that things had definite edges, and that the landscape was not just a blur'. Has been very busy recently and has written five short plays, which will keep him revising for many months. Thinks this mood was inspired by some of his old plays 'after lying apparently dead all these years' being staged again: some travelling players have been touring "Kestrel Edge" for the last six months, and another new company is to stage "Ernshaw" as their first production. His 'new book of war-rhymes ["The Outpost"] has been held-up at the binders', but should come out on Thursday: will send a copy to Bob 'as a poor return' for his 'most welcome gift'.

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

East Hendred, Wantage, Berkshire. - Thanks Bob for sending "Aftermath", which will need a leisurely reading' to appreciate fully, as it is a 'considerable body of verse'; has though glanced through and seen that he is 'familiar' with many of the pieces. Envies Bob for 'being able to publish so plump a collection in these days of parsimony': has himself 'cumbersome arrears' of unpublished material. His "Alert" has gone into a second impression, so perhaps his publishers will be willing to bring out a 'further selection'. Anticipates 'much pleasure' from "Aftermath".

Reviews of "An Annual of New Poetry, 1917"

Newspaper cuttings with reviews, most sent to Trevelyan by Durrant's Press Cuttings Agency' from: the "Times Literary Supplement"; "New Statesman"; "The Nation" and "Daily News" [two clippings glued to the same sheet], and a longer review from the "Nation"; "Observer; "Daily Chronicle"; "Keighley News"; "Westminster Gazette" [including an extended profile of Edward Thomas, recently killed at the front, whose poems appear in the "Annual" under the pseudonym Edward Eastaway]; "Southport Guardian"; "Yorkshire Observer"; "Bacup Chronicle"; "Englishwoman"; "Literary World"; "Poetry Review"; "Welsh Outlook"; "Manchester Guardian"; "Athenaeum"; "Expository Times" [poems by W. H. Davies, John Drinkwater, and W. W. Gibson]; "Glasgow Herald"; "Colour" [by W. Teignmouth Shore]; "British Australasian"; "Yorkshire Post"; "Cambridge Review" [two pieces]; "New Age".

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Stick figure hanging from a gallows (labelled 'The Kaiser') used instead of an address. - The Abercrombies are settled back at "The Gallows": the bicycles restored after some neglect by the Frosts, and a new 'domestic' appointed. Ironic comments about both this woman and her predecessor. David is delighted with the daffodils: contrast of his romanticism with his brother Mike's realism. The children's fond memories of time at the Trevelyans'. Very interested in the news of the professorship in Toronto, has written to Dickinson to say that if there is a decent salary he will apply. Sends 'a specimen of your Favourite Passion'. Apologises for the mistake with Trevelyan's "New Numbers"; the Gibsons sent them out. The Abercrombies have bought a gramophone.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Is staying in the 'Blackett' room next to Molly and Charles; Catherine [Abercrombie] is in his old bedroom over the library. Went to the Gibbet yesterday. On Friday they are going to tea with Geoffrey [Young]; unfortunately Len will not be there. Had tea with Edith Bulmer yesterday. Glad Ada is 'well and cheerful'. Has written to [Wilfrid] Gibson about 'Gibson [sic: a slip of the pen for 'Geraldine'] - rather a difficult letter to write'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Very sorry to hear about Geraldine Gibson; '[Wilfrid] was so dependent on her. Who will look after him now?'. Has had a letter from Down, Scott and Down which he encloses and asks Bessie to keep for him; is writing to ask them to pay the money to him rather than her, since it is due to him and he has an overdraft at Drummonds. Elsa Richmond is staying; she is 'very deaf now' and he finds her 'difficult to talk to'. Hopes to see Edith B[ulmer] today or tomorrow, as well as Geoffrey and Len [Winthrop Young].

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Gosberton House, Nr. Spalding. - Abercrombie has been lecturing; he has received £100 from the Royal Literary Fund and has a new-found appreciation for "Carnegie and those jockeys". "New Numbers" is coming to an end, as Rupert [Brooke] is fighting (he has just returned from Antwerp), Wilfrid [Gibson] is making more money elsewhere, and he himself isn't writing poetry at the moment. Catherine is doing well after the birth of their third son [Ralph]. Asks if Bessie knows Van Dorn [Willem van Doorn] who has been staying with Wilfrid. Frost and his family are staying at "The Gallows". Asks if Julian knows the Great Northern's Atlantic engines.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Casa Boccaccio, Thursday. - Glad to hear that Trevelyan got home safe. Waterfield has not yet seen the Mothersills. Has not yet heard from Wilfrid [Gibson] but presumes he is married and gone to the Gallows. The Abercrombies start from home on Monday and go straight to Grange [over Sands] on Wednesday; Marsh has asked them to lunch but there may not be time. "La Julia Grassa" has not returned, for which they are grateful, the "real Julia is doing admirably for us". This trip to Italy seems to have been even better than the last [in 1911]: very kind of Waterfield to have them at Aulla; the drive from Fivizzano to Castlenuovo was "glorious"; they liked Lucca too but the "zanzare" [mosquitos] plagued them; excellence of the wine provided by Will [Arnold-Forster] at Montefiano. Cannot sufficiently express their gratitude to Trevelyan. Sends love to Trevelyan, his family, and the Bottomleys. His wife asks for the name and address of Grant Watson's mother-to-be at Grange, as they have a book to return.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to R. C. Trevelyan

40 Well Walk, Hampstead, NW. - Is 'pleased and honoured' that Bob, [Gordon] Bottomley, [Lascelles] Abercrombie and [Wilfrid] Gibson want to include him in their scheme for a Poetry Annual; thinks such a publication is 'needed' and would be glad to contribute. However, does not understand some of the suggestions, and has 'doubts about the wisdom of others': thinks it would not be possible to have a 'non-poet editor' who can hold a poem over for the next year, as the same poem is unlikely to be available in two successive years; also asks if contributors would be restricted to publishing in the "Annual", as he thinks this would be impossible'. Thinks [Marsh's] "Georgian Poetry" did better than "New Numbers" as it was more catholic; would like the Annual to be 'even more so'. Thinks they should form a committee of between three and five poets to decide the price and size of the Annual on financial grounds then offer an equal number of pages to, say: [John] Masefield, [W. B.] Yeats, [Laurence] Binyon, Abercrombie, [W. H.] Davies, [Walter] de la Mare, [Ralph] Hodgson, Gibson, Bottomley, himself, Trevelyan, and another. For the next number, the committee should be the only ones with a right to a place. Any untaken pages should be offered to 'people like [Robert] Bridges and H.D. the best of the Imagists for opposite reasons'; discusses how extra pages should be allocated. Thinks it important to invite 'all well known men' like [Henry] Newbolt, Rudyard Kipling, [Thomas] Hardy and [Maurice] Hewlett, 'whatever one thinks of their work' though not every year; some would refuse but 'that is their fault'. Should also invite 'as many as possible from enemy cliques' and those who have been well reviewed. Profits should be shared out by page. The committee should not 'judge of merit', except in choice of contributors, which would 'insure much more variety and a wider circulation'. The book must not seem bulky, so recommends using the 'very beautiful thin papers' available now used for bibles and the classics. Would like to 'rule out [Robert] Frost from the first list as not being a British subject'; thinks he and other Americans could be allocated a few pages but 'never be on the committee'. Discusses possible role of the publisher.

Asks Bob if in March, April or May there is 'any quantity of fallen leaves under Olive trees', and what the correct adjective formed from 'Medusa' would be. Sends love to the Trevelyans. Offers in a postscript to take responsibility for the 'physical appearance' of the Annual for no payment. Twelve may be too large a number for the 'inner list' but well-known names outside their set should be included; Yeats would be 'safe' as he would never want much space; dividing profits by number of pages would give Abercrombie & Gibson and others 'with a tendancy to metrical diarrhea [sic]' a chance of getting as much money as by the other plan. Expects to be here on the 22nd and 23rd and will be glad to see Bob; cannot invite him to the house yet as the children are ill and they have 'servant troubles to boot'.

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

Greenway, Yaverland, Sandown, Isle of Wight. - Thanks for the 'charming gift' [the collected "From the Shiffolds" published by the Hogarth Press?]: as Bob says, he already knows most of the poems, but re-read them with 'renewed delight' and now feels 'even more grateful' to Bob for the pleasure they give. Glad that his own "Coldknuckles" appeals to Bob: no other book of his has brought 'such gratifying letters' from his 'poet-friends - yet, according to yesterday's TLS, it is just damnable rubbish!'

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

Greenway, Yaverland, Sandown, Isle of Wight. - Thanks Bob for his 'charming gift' [this year's "From the Shiffolds"]; particularly good for him to have Bob's 'admirable versions' of [classical] poems which in Wilfrid's 'ignorance' he would otherwise be 'unable to enjoy'. Cannot currently send anything in return, as his two volumes 'which should have been out months ago' are still held up by the printers and binders. Best wishes for 'as happy a Christmas as is possible in such a world'.

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

East Hendred, Wantage, Berkshire. - Thanks Bob for his 'delightful Christmas gift' [his poem "A Dream"]. Was 'busy on hack-work' when it arrived, so only read it yesterday with 'much interest and admiration'. Asks if the 'two lines about Verulam' mean that Bob is an 'advocate of the Baconian heresy' [about the authorship of Shakespeare's works]: if so, he is the first poet Wilfrid has met 'who could believe for a moment that the author of the essays could have written the plays'; has also 'never met an actor who could conceive that they were the work of an author without intimate stage-experience'. This is however a 'minor issue', which 'detracts little from the beauty and wisdom of the poem'. He and his wife send best wishes to the Trevelyans for Christmas and the new year.

Letter from John Drinkwater to R. C. Trevelyan

260 Mary Street, Balsall Heath, Birmingham. - Asks what the arrangement [with the publishers Constable] about reprinting work from the "Annual [of New Poetry]": is planning a selection from his earlier books, to be published in early autumn, and would like to include "June Dance". Would also include the two short poems he published in the "Annual" in a new book at Christmas if allowed. Thinks Trevelyan may have said something about the 'twelve month arrangement' not applying this time because of the day, and remembers that Wilfrid [Gibson] published his contribution in 'separate book for almost simultaneously'. Asks in a postscript whether Trevelyan knows when Wilfrid is due back [from the US?], and whether Geraldine is still staying with the Trevelyans; sends 'salutations' to her if so.

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

26 Nassington Road, Hampstead, N.W.3. - Is 'pleased and proud to have these two noble volumes' [Bob's "Collected Works"] with an inscription. Has just written a short review of the first for "English" [Wilfrid Gibson, "The Collected Works of R. C. Trevelyan . Volume i: Poems", "English: Journal of the English Association", Volume 2, Issue 12, Autumn 1939, Pages 387–388] but fears it is 'not very satisfactory' as he did not have room to treat the poems in detail; trusts he has at least 'said nothing to hurt' Bob, and hopes he has 'managed at least to express some of the pleasure' he had in re-reading. Hopes to repeat that when he has the leisure to re-read the plays. At the moment, everything is upset, and he is writing in a 'half-denuded house'. He and Gerald [his wife] have taken a 'tiny cottage in Berkshire "for the duration"', and hope to keep [their daughter] Audrey's baby there in safety; Gerald has already gone and he will join her soon after getting some 'necessary business' done. Jocelyn's firm has evacuated to Glasgow, and Michael is working at an aeroplane factory in Gloucester, so 'Certainly Hitler has managed to dislocate our lives for us!'. Hopes things are not going too badly for Bob in this 'infernal world'; wishes success for the "Collected Works".

Letter from Wilfrid Gibson to R. C. Trevelyan

Greenway, Ledbury. - Thanks Bob for the "New Parsifal": has only had time to cut it so far, but has heard Bob read it four or five times and knows it well already. Glad it is so 'bravely attired'. When he finishes his current work, a new "Borderlands" poem called "Hoops", looks forward to reading Bob's work with 'new relish'. Asks in a postscript when Bob is coming to visit.

Press cuttings, mostly relating to R. C. Trevelyan's "Rimeless Numbers"

Most sent on by Durrant's Press Cuttings, St Andrew's House, 32-34 Holborn Viaduct, E.C.1 and 3 St Andrew Street, Holborn Circus, E.C.1.

1) from the "Dublin Evening Mail", 28 Apr 1932.
2) from "The Listener", 4 May 1932, "Overhauling Pegasus"; also includes discussion of collections by William Plomer and Alan Mulgan.
3) from the "Northern Echo", 4 May 1932, "New Verse"; also includes discussion of collections by Plomer, Sir Leo Chiozza Money, and Dorothy Wellesley
4) from the "Spectator", 14 May 1932, "Poetry-Lovers, Prosody and Poetry", by F. R. Leavis; also discusses collections by Ann Page, Mulgan, Anna de Bary, Wellesley, William Jeffrey, A[braham] Abrahams, Julian Huxley and Plomer
5) from "Country Life", 14 May 1932, by V. H. Friedlaender; also discusses collections by John Lehmann and Plomer, and the Hogarth Press's anthology "New Signatures"
6) from the "Aberdeen Press and Journal", 18 May 1932
7) from the "Bedfordshire Times", 24 May 1932, "A Book for the Poet-Technician"
8) from "Granta", 27 May 1932, "Tomes of Pomes"; also discusses collections by Plomer and Philip Henderson.
9) from the "London Mercury, June 1932, by Alan Pryce-Jones; also discusses collection by Henderson
10) from "Life and Letters", June 1932, by Austin Clarke; also discusses works by A.E. [George William Russell], Thomas Sturge Moore, "New Signatures", Huxley, Plomer, and Sherard Vines's anthology "Whips and Scorpions"
11) from the "Manchester Guardian", 1 Jun 1932, "Mr. Trevelyan's Verse".
12) from the "Scotsman". 1 Jun 1932;, "New Verse Forms" also discusses works by Plomer, Dorothy Matthews, Abrahams, Chiozza Money, and Horace Horsnell
13) from the "Oxford Magazine", 2 June 1932, "Poetry and Tradition".
14) from the "Scots Observer", 9 June 1932; also includes discussions of works by Mulgan, Rosamond Langbridge and Lorna de' Lucchi
15) from the "Buxton Advertiser", 2 July 1932
16) from the "Times Literary Supplement", 14 July 1932; also another copy, not sent by Durrnants
17) from the "Glasgow Herald", 20 July 1932 "On a Classical Model"
18) from the "New Statesman and Nation", 3 Sept 1932, "Some Poets"; also involves discussion of works by Laurence Whistler, George Villiers, Arthur Legge, Charles Davies, de' Lucchi, Geoffrey Johnson, Norah Nisbet and Mulgan.
19) from the "Sunday Times", 9 Oct 1932, by Dilys Powel, "Scholars and Poets"; also discusses works by Geoffrey Scott, Whistler, Davies, Geoffrey Lapage, Villiers, and Eden Phillpotts
20) "Rhythm and Rhyme. Mr R. C. Trevelyan's Notes on Metre"; perhaps from the "Birmingham Daily Mail" of 28 Apr 1932, as there is a spare Durrant's label which has become detached from its review
21) from the "Observer", 6 Nov 1932, "New Poetry", by Humbert Wolfe. Not sent by Durrants; also discussion of works by Clifford Bax. W. H. Davies, Gordon Bottomley, Edmund Blunden, Wilfrid Gibson, and Richard Church
22) from the "Japan Chronicle", 15 July 1932, "Poets of a Transitional Period"; also discusses works by Plomer, Easdale, Lehmann, C. Day Leis. and "New Signatures"
23) from "The Bookman", Sept 1932, "The ''Georgian Poets', or Twenty Years After", by Wilfrid Gibson. Not a review of "Rimeless Numbers", but a discussion of Edward Marsh's anthologies

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Lascelles Abercrombie

Apologises for bothering Lascelles again; hopes this will be the last time. Is sending the new draft of the contract [for the "Annual of New Poetry"] from Constables, with their suggested alterations; the publishers have largely accepted the contributors' suggestions. Lists the few differences: a clause forbidding anthologizing elsewhere during the year; a clause allowing the publishers to sell left-over copies after the first year; and the absence of the clause binding the contributors to go on publishing with them. As for American copyright, has heard from Wilfrid [Gibson] who says he could not contribute if they acquired it, since he has already sold the American serial rights of his poems for the "Annual"; since Gordon [Bottomley] is also not bothered about getting it, and neither Lascelles, nor Constables themselves seem not to be concerned, the idea should probably be dropped. Hopes to hear good news about Catherine.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

20 Marmion Rd, Sefton Park, Liverpool. - Praise of Trevelyan's translations of Aeschylus' "Oresteia", Lucretius, and Theocritus. Hopes that Trevelyan will go on to produce a decent Greek text of Theocritus, as textual critics have no sense of poetry, but also says that translations must not keep him from his own work. Has seen Wilfrid [Gibson], who hopes to be able to get on with his "Krindlesyke", and has introduced him to ?Redwood Hudleson, author of an epic poem on evolution.

Letter [incomplete] from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

[First page missing]. Wilfrid [Gibson] has been 'ordered to bed for 6 weeks' and has to follow a 'starvation diet': the Abercrombies have been worried about him for a while, and it is not certain what the problem is. Believes Gerald [Wilfrid Gibson's wife Geraldine] is fairly well, but fears Wilfrid will 'worry himself into a far worse state' about Gerald waiting on him. Sorry to hear that [Thomas Sturge] Moore's "Judith" was 'mauled' [in performance at the Queen's Theatre, 23-24 Jan 1916]: was very impressed when he read it, and thought it would act well, but if actors can 'savage Shakespeare, obviously they can garrotte Moore'; the first thing they should do after the war is 'kill all the actors & lawyers' [a paraphrase of a line in "Henry VI", Part 2]. If it is true that Abercrombie is keeping the annual back ["Annual of New Poetry"], then he ought to be in the 'jaws of Lucifer along with Judas Iscariot, Brutus & Cassius"; discusses this passage of Dante; cannot see any reason why the "Annual" should wait for him, as he would be 'uncomfortable' if left out but would try to get ready for the next issue. Is writing a little at the moment, but only plays which he feels may work as drama but will below the poetic standard the Annual should keep to. He and Gordon [Bottomley] think that Bob is 'quite wrongly diffident about "The Last Man" [ie. "The Death of Man"?]: neither of them would 'stand up to B[ertrand] Russell on philosophical grounds', but they would both defend the work on poetic grounds; he may be a 'very good connoisseur', but they are 'Professionals when it comes to poetry'. May have a 'Burst [of poetic composition]' when they return to Ryton, and in that case the "Annual" would have first claim on anything he writes, but currently feels as 'likely to write poetry as a bag-pudding'. They should not wait for him before publishing: the "Annual" need not start with a 'full team', as this is not football. H. O. Meredith would like to join, and Abercrombie has said he would 'put it to the other members' but that Meredith must not mind if he is rejected. Abercrombie, Gordon, [John] Drinkwater and Wilfrid are all willing to have him if nobody else objects, but it must be unanimous; Meredith is 'prepared for the jealousy of professional poets'. Bessie must be troubled about the 'disasters [floods] in Holland'; there is enough to worry about [with the war]; hope she has not been 'familiarly affected' and that it is not as 'shocking' as the newspapers make out. The Abercrombies are all well, and Catherine has definitely benefited from the change of scene; the 'dread' they feel [about the recurrence of her cancer?] has 'so far kept aloof'; the children are 'flourishing', and Bob should tell Julian that David is now a schoolboy

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Has sent on Eddie's letter to [Isaac] Levine in Chicago, who wrote to Bob two years ago asking for something to print privately; Bob sent ["The Death of Man"] which Levine printed in an edition of about thirty copies; he then asked leave to print another, and it must have been one of them which he sent to Eddie. Bob had not sent it himself, as he only had a few copies and wanted to publish it later in the "Annual [of New Poetry]" or elsewhere. Glad Eddie liked it, as he himself was unsure; Lascelles [Abercrombie] and Gordon [Bottomley] liked it, but others had been doubtful. Levine writes to him occasionally and 'seems a quite nice, rather-simple-minded enthusiast, who really cares about poetry'; he is keen on Lascelles and Gordon, and also Wilfrid [Gibson]. Bob has not heard lately how Gerald [Gibson] is doing; saw her in London during the winter, and must write.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Hopes that Edward will soon be sent a copy of the New Annual ["An Annual of New Poetry"], which seems to be coming out 'after many delays'; does not know how it will do, but hopes it will do well enough to justify another volume next year. Unfortunately [Lascelles] Abercrombie] has written nothing new for inclusion; [Walter] de la Mare also seems to have nothing. If Edward publishes, as Bob hopes he will, another G[eorgian] P[oetry], Bob does not think there will be any trouble with including anything he might want from the "Annual", as the publishers Constables have been very reasonable. For instance, both [John] Drinkwater and Wilfrid [Gibson] have been allowed to publish separately poems included in the "Annual", even allowing Wilfrid to meet his obligations by publishing before the "Annual" appeared; this is 'very unfortunate' for the "Annual", which is meant to include only unpublished work - they had wanted to bring it out before the Christmas, but 'the printers either could not, or would not, hurry up'. Mrs [Geraldine] Gibson is here with Audrey until Wilfrid comes back [from a tour of the US]; Audrey is teething but otherwise very well. Mrs Gibson has 'very good accounts' from Wilfrid, and so far no letters seem lost; both he and de la Mare 'seem to have had great success'. Must try and see Edward in London soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Very good news that there will be another "Georgian Poetry"; wishes it 'all possible success'. Eddie 'naturally' wants Gordon [Bottomley]'s play ["King Lear's Wife"], and even if it had not been promised Bob thinks it would be better printed in "Georgian Poets" where it will have a larger circulation than in his own "Annual [of New Poetry]"; thinks it should be 'printed as soon as possible and in under the most favourable circumstances'. Does not yet know what material there is for the annual; rather depends on Lascelles [Abercrombie], Wilfrid [Gibson] and [Robert] Frost; Bob hopes it will encourage Lascelles to write something new. Eddie was 'exceedingly kind in that matter concerning Gordon': Bob knows 'the help was really very much needed'. Gordon says he would like to write to [Edmund] Gosse, who 'seems to have been instrumental', but is worried in case it would not be thought right, and in case he should not know Gosse was involved. Asks Eddie to let him know if he thinks Gosse would like it; Gordon did not want to bother Eddie, so Bob said he would ask.

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