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Trevelyan, Julian Otto (1910-1988), painter and printmaker
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Airgraph letter from John Luce to R.C. Trevelyan

Lt. J.M. Luce c/o Grindlay's Bank, Bombay. - Has been ill and in hospital, followed by three weeks 'glorious' leave at Darjeeling. The view of Kanchenjunga is superb, Everest by comparison disappointing; had he been fit he would have gone trekking to Tibet. Is now back at his depot but expects to go to a unit in the west of India soon. Has sent some tea from Darjeeling to Trevelyan and Bessie and hopes it arrives safely. Hopes Ursula and Julian's baby has arrived. Has been reading Hazlitt's "Table-Talk": the kind of essays Trevelyan would write 'equally well if not better'.

Card from Sophie Weisse to R. C. Trevelyan

The Pantiles, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Asks Trevelyan if he could do Eugenie Schumann, and thereby her, a favour by letting her know quickly what he thinks of Marie Busch as a translator from German into English. She is telling Miss Schumann that from what little she herself saw of her, Miss Busch knew both German languages well, but would appreciate a few lines from Trevelyan. Hopes the Trevelyans, including Julian are very well. Asks in a postscript that her question be kept a secret, as Miss Schumann requested.

Exercise book with diary by R. C. Trevelyan

Trevelyan has filled in the sections printed on the front: 'Written by' with 'R.C.T'; 'Commenced' with 27 August 1923 [looks like 8]; 'School' with 'Ἡ ΓΗ' ['The Earth' in Ancient Greek]. Notes in his first entry that he has been reading Ponsonby's book ["English Diaries" by Arthur Ponsonby] which has inspired him to start this diary. Mentions of Mabel [Godwin?], Marian [?], Alice, Bert and Bobbie Elms; Bessie and Julian; his parents; Miles Malleson and his wife [Joan] and uncle [Philip Malleson]; O[liver] Simon at the "Fleuron" (who asks him to translate the "Acts of the Apostles", to be illustrated by Paul Nash); Miss Ewing [later wife of Walter Rea], Nicky Mariano; Bernard and Mary Berenson; Frances and Arthur Dakyns (visiting the Ponsonbys at Fernhurst); his brother George (who has written to the "Times" saying the matter between Greece and Italy should be referred to the Powers not the League of Nations); Margaret and Ralph Vaughan Williams and their mother; Mrs [Jane] Russell Rea; Irene [Cooper Willis or Noel-Baker]; 'Miss [blank left], with whom Rennier had an affair. She is now private secretary to [Henry?] Hamilton Fyfe'; Francis Birrell; Clifford and Joan Allen; 'an Italian-French lady' whom Trevelyan had met at I Tatti; Barbara Strachey; [Simon] Bussy [paintings by]; John Rodker 'and his child [Joan] by Sonia [Cohen]'; a 'nice rather muddle-headed young man.. Labour candidate for Petersfield' [Dudley Aman]; Bertrand Russell.

Works on: translations of Theocritus; his 'Flood poem' ["The Deluge"]; possible continuation of "Pterodamozels"; review of books on metre by Lascelles Abercrombie and E[gerton Smith] (Smith is the first person he has 'attacked' in a review; wonders if Desmond MacCarthy will think his comments 'too strong); review of Sturge Morre's "Judas" for Leonard Woolf at the "Nation"; his 'Pandora play'.

Reads (as well as Ponsonby, and sometimes with Julian): the "Manchester Guardian", Spenser's "Mother Hubbard ['s Tale]", Epicharmus, "Henry IV pt 1", Phaedrus, Macaulay, Aristophanes, the 'Summer number' of Julian's "Hurtenham Magazine", Lucian, the "Mikado"; Ssuma Ch'ien [Sima Qian]; Hastings' "Dictionary of the Bible" [at the London Library]; a "Classical Review" with Duff and Bailey on Lucretius; Molly MacCarthy's autobiography ["A Nineteenth-Century Childhood", 'Very charming']

Incomplete letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Hopes Julian 'escaped flooding by the high tide today'; is writing to ask if Julian and Ursula would like any tickets for the Glyndebourne operas next year as they are selling quickly. Thinks they do [Mozart's] "Entführung" and "Cosi Fan Tutte" very well, but the "Magic Flute" less well, since [Fritz] Busch leaves it to others to 'conduct and even rehearse'. Lists possible dates. A 'terrible thing' has happened: Constance Vaughan Williams has been run over by a motorist.

Incomplete letter from [R. C. Trevelyan] to [Julian Trevelyan]

[Constance Vaughan Williams was run over by a car at] 'the gates of Leith Hill Place, and is still in great danger'; it does not seem likely she will recover. The car did not stop; 'Cook's boy', who was on his bicycle, was also hurt, but not too seriously. A 'bad business'; fortunately 'old Mrs V. W.' is 'taking it well so far'. He is very sorry for Hervey, and Bessie is 'rather upset'. Sends love to 'you both' [Julian and Ursula].

Letter from Adila Fachiri to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Tors Hotel, Lynmouth, S.O., N. Devon. - Jelly writes that some white china, without a card, has arrived. Adila thinks it must be the Trevelyans's [wedding] present, and 'longs to see' it as Jelly says it is 'quite beautiful'. She and her husband are 'too happy for words': Alic is 'quite perfect'. They will stay here another week, then go to London for an 'indefinite time'; Mrs Trevelyan must come and see her if she is in town, and she and Alic would love to visit later. Sends regards to Mr Trevelyan, and to 'little Julien [sic]'.

Letter from Alice Clara [Lily] Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Morgan hopes to be back early next month. He has been busy meeting prisoners from Turkey, including Sir Joseph Napier, a great-nephew of Miss [Laura] Forster, whose father Sir Lennox was killed at Gallipoli. Sir Joseph was well treated: he told Morgan that the officers were much better treated than the men since the Turks were 'such savages & such fools they did not think men mattered' - including their own men. Went to see Miss Forster in September: afraid she is aged a great deal by anxiety. Is glad that Joe Napier is now with her, and hopes she will soon see Morgan. Glad Trevelyan is liking his work; hopes Mrs Trevelyan and their son are well.

Letter from André Kalitinsky to R. C. Trevelyan

Bolleystr[asse] 36, Zürich. - Asks if it would be possible to keep the two thousand francs which Trevelyan lent him as capital for his Swiss naturalisation, which is turning out to be a 'very long and difficult business' and will last about another year. Knows how much Trevelyan has already done for him, and would never ask to keep the money so long if naturalisation were not so important.. His work at the Poly[technikum] becomes ever more interesting and difficult. Hopes to have finished his studies in two years; is impatient to start a 'life of [his] own', but time goes very fast now, with 'all the work and gliding [ski-ing?] and rowing'. Has a very interesting summer job in a factory in Paris. Hopes that Trevelyan will come to visit; would much like to see him and Julian again.

Letter from André Kalitinsky to R. C. Trevelyan

Bolleystr[asse] 36, Zürich. - Thanks Trevelyan for lending him the money for his [Swiss] naturalisation, which is very hard; has already had to go to Bern three times. Is trying to think of the process as 'sport' and enjoy it, but it matters very much, and also interferes with his work. Glad that Julian and his wife are happy and would like to meet them. Hopes to be able to come to Paris for a couple of weeks at Christmas, and to see Trevelyan then.

Letter from André Toledano to R. C. Trevelyan

Conseil Supréme Economique, 26 Rue de Bassano. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'Bob Trev': sorry he has taken so long to reply, but has been very busy with his new job as head of the French press service of the Supreme Economic Council which he started in 'April last'. Pleased that Bob values their acquaintance: he himself took great pleasure in the 'most delightful evenings' they spent together, and looks forward to seeing him again. Will be in England very soon as he is about to join the League of Nations (probably as the head of one of the sub-sections), and hopes to get down to Dorking to see Bob. Very glad of the post: Bob knows he has 'always been interested in peace questions'. Expects Bob found his wife and son well: must have been a 'real joy' to see them again; is keen to meet them. His own wife gave birth to a son, Yves-Bernard-Georges, on 22 May: both are in 'perfect health'. Had lunch with Francis [Birrell] and the Waleys last Tuesday: Mrs Waley is 'also at the Supreme Economic Council'. Peace has come at last: will do his best to 'make it durable'. Yvonne [his wife] sends regards.

Letter from André Toledano to R. C. Trevelyan

League of Nations, Sunderland House, Curzon Street. - Was very kind of Bob to wire him, and he is sorry he was previously engaged for a weekend in Oxford, his 'alma mater'. Will be 'delighted' to see Bob again on Saturday next, and will take the 4 pm train for Ockley. Will be very glad if [Goldsworthy] Lowes Dickinson is there as he 'especially' wants to meet him; will be glad to know Trevelyan's wife and son, and to meet [Donald] Tovey.

Letter from Anna Maria Philips to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Julian and Ursula's brief visit has 'passed off most pleasantly' except for the rain of the last five days; they arrived on Monday evening and started home this morning. Much admires Julian's new overcoat for the fit and the tweed, which is 'so good in shade & quality'. They were 'highly pleased with all they saw at the Red Rose Guild stalls yesterday'; Ursula had a 'good talk' with Mr [Bernard] Leach and Mr [William Bower] Dalton about their exhibits; after lunch they then visited 'the fine collection of Watercolours at the Whitworth Art Gallery'. Much enjoyed having 'such easy guests, good talkers and considerate in every way'. Wishes they could have given her a better report about Bessie's eyes, but is glad 'Wireless has come in' so Bessie can listen to 'music, speeches and news every evening'. Hopes Bessie's new chauffeur drives carefully, since Julian tells her Matthews has given that up. The autumn 'tints' will be very beautiful in Surrey; all their trees are nearly bare. Hopes she can come and spend a week at the Shiffolds in the second week of January, and read aloud to Bessie. Julian and Ursula hope to 'go for Winter Sports to Austria at Christmas'. Sends love to Bessie and Robert, and regards to Miss Busch if she is staying with them.

Letter from Anna Maria Philips to R. C. Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Kind of Robert to send her his book ["Aftermath"], 'so attractively issued by the Hogarth Press'; likes the 'soft green' of the binding. Is glad to see Robert's 'touching' poems to [Gordon] Bottomley, [Goldsworthy] Lowes Dickinson and D[esmond] MacCarthy again, and glad that the book has already been 'so favourably reviewed'. Very sorry to hear that so many copies of his "Collected Poems" were destroyed last winter [in the Blitz on London]; many works cannot be sold because of publishers' losses. Sends love to 'dear Elizabeth', and thanks for her letter with news of Julian. 'Strange' to think he is in the 'heart of Africa', and expects he will have very interesting things to tell when they see him next; expects he is 'revelling in tropical heat'. Her daffodils are doing well, and the lawn is very green.

Letter from Anna Maria Philips to R. C. Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Thinks Bob should see the enclosed letters from Miss [Meta] Gaskell [19/22] and Mr Broadfield [no longer present] which she received last week. Has bought six copies of his play ["Bride of Dionysus"] which she is sending to friends whom she thinks will admire it; expects he has had 'endless letters of congratulations' from his 'many friends'. Sends love to Elizabeth; expects she is still at Hove and hopes the sea air does her and Julian good after the 'trying' winter. Would very much to see them all later if they can visit.

Letter from Anna Maria Philips to R. C. Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Was 'deeply impressed' by the poem Robert has 'so kindly' sent her this week: which applies as much to the present day as it does to its composition date last year. Robert's 'telling words about books, culture, future conditions' make her think about 'prospects' for people like Julian when the world war ends; is glad she will not be here to 'mould' her life to 'such strange conditions as they will have to face'. Hopes her present, "Whitaker ['s Almanack?]" will soon reach him.

Letter from Arthur Ransome to R. C. Trevelyan

Low Ludderburn. - Is glad about the Selections [Trevelyan's "Selected Poetry", published by Macmillan's] and looks forward to seeing it. His own book ["Coot Club"] 'in an awful state'; was ill for too long in the autumn and fears he will not get it done in time. Trevelyan must come for a sail in Swallow if he comes North; Ransome hasn't had time for once since his return from Norfolk but by the end of August his book will be done or given up. Notes in a postscript that the "marriages of the new generation seem anachronisms" [a reference to the wedding of Julian Trevelyan and Ursula Darwin?].

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

British Museum, London: W.C.1. - Has not written before as he did not know where Bob was; but 'Mrs Riviere says Mrs Sickert says' Bob is near them, so he thinks this may well reach him [in Spain?]. The newspapers lead him to believe that Bob must be 'starving', but if he has flour 'there are all manner of amusing things' he could make. Binyon's adaptation of "Shakuntala" was acted at two matinées, but 'received rather gloomily'; he himself found it 'hopelessly boring', though Bateson and Ricketts were 'separately & independently enraptured'. [Alfred] Cortot has been performing a great deal; Waley now likes him less, and thinks it is only really the 'moderns' he plays well, while his performances of Beethoven, Chopin and so on are 'quite silly'; he will not play early music though he 'does it very well', but 'rams vulgarities like the worst sort of Liszt fireworks into his programs'. Forgot it 'infuriates' Bob when he talks about music. Expects Bessie and Julian are at the Shiffolds. Seems 'no prospect of Francis [Birrell] appearing in London' soon, which is 'very depressing'; hears that G Franklin has arrived, but 'not in this district, happily'.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

50 Gordon Square, W.C. - Apologises for not thanking Bob for his 'delightful' "From the Shiffolds"; there is a great deal he likes "very much", such as that 'things like "Krishna to Radha" have a strict form'. Offers the suggestion that 'nothing' rather than 'naught' on page 10 would 'make better music'. They [he and Beryl de Zoete] have just been staying a week at Ramsbury in Wiltshire, to be near Gerald Brenan; describes the countryside and calls it 'delightful'. Hopes the Trevelyans are well; has seen Julian, who had recently been with them and said they had 'chuckled over [Arthur's] letter to the Times".

Letter from Augustus Moore Daniel to R. C. Trevelyan

2 Hampstead Hill Gardens, Rosslyn Hill, N.W.3. - Very glad to have Trevelyan's Christmas greetings "From the Shiffolds"; his 'research among the Grecian Sages is wonderful'. Wishes he could 'rival' Trevelyan, but his 'zeal is now many expended on French literature'. Has just visited Julian's exhibition at Lefevre's gallery, and intends to go again. Hopes to see Trevelyan again if he comes to London; sends best wishes to him and his wife for 1947.

Letter from Augustus Moore Daniel to R. C. Trevelyan

2 Hampstead Hill Gardens, Rosslyn Hill, N.W.3. - Very good of Trevy to send "From the Shiffolds" as Christmas greetings: he and his wife send best wishes in return. Asks how the Trevelyans are; has not seen any works by Julian recently, though he 'much frequent[s] Picture Galleries'. Nick [their son], his wife, and small daughter are staying here while the house they have bought in Chelsea is repaired; Nick is staying in the Army, and is now an acting Major. He himself is 'always reading poetry in scraps, in the bus, in bed...'; he has recently regained some of his 'old passion for Fitzgerald', and always has Rilke and Horace by him, whom Trevy will call an 'odd couple'; has recently 'turned to Pope - stranger still' but now will 'turn to' Trevy.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Apologises for not replying sooner to Bessie's last letter, having been too weak to write after flu. The market value of books is poor, so he is afraid she will not be able to meet her 'great expectations' for Bob's books: large edition of Botticelli drawings now an 'encumbrance'. Glad to hear Julian does well; remembers he had a good sense of colour. Also glad his second marriage is a success. Fears he will never see England again.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Thanks for the letter and the anthology of Bob's poetry. A pity that Desmond [MacCarthy] did not live to write about Bob. Has Forster's and Virginia Woolf's last books but has not yet read them: the number of periodicals he must read leaves little time for books. Nicky reads them to him but it is slow going; the current book is Iris Origo's biography of Leopardi. Julian must come and visit next time he is in Italy.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Glad Bessie is in better health and spirits; he himself suffers but this is to be expected at nearly 89. Bessie's friend Mr Rees may visit I Tatti, and Berenson himself will be happy to see him if there and well enough. Molly Nicolson visited recently, before that Cyril Connolly; they are expecting Rosamond Lehmann and Ernest Hemingway. His book on Piero della Francesca will not appear before July.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Agrees that it is difficult to destroy personal letters, though one knows they will interest others either too much or not at all; understands how she clings to those Bob wrote to her. If she comes across letters he himself wrote to Bob, please do send them on. Hopes she is getting on well with her son and his wife.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Has received and praises the speech given by Bessie at the opening of Robert's library [at Bickbeck College, London; also glad to see Forster's speech. It must have been a pleasing and happy occasion. He and Nicky are glad she has good friends in England, and he wishes he could travel and see her again. The 'Julian couple' were charming.

Letter from Bernard Darwin to R. C. Trevelyan

Gorringes, Downe, Kent. - His and his wife's thanks for Bob's 'magnificent Christmas card ["From the Shiffolds"], which gives him a 'nice Greek feeling' and makes him wish he had worked harder at 'that noble language' when he was young. The Darwins are looking forward to Julian and Ursula [their daughter] coming with Philip on Christmas Eve; thinks they intend to leave early on Boxing Day for a children's party in London. The weather is 'infernally seasonable' here, though the forecast is 'cheering'; hopes the Trevelyans are not 'frozen'.

Letter from Bernard Darwin to R. C. Trevelyan

Gorringes, Downe, Kent. - His and his wife's thanks for Bob's 'nice poetical Christmas card ["From the Shiffolds"]; he likes "The Pleasure" and "The Dream", perhaps he likes "The Pleasure" best as he 'likes some rhymes', and 'can't help it' if that is a 'weakness'. Hopes Bob's Leith Hill is not as 'badly scarred' as it was when he described it. The Darwins are looking forward to Ursula and Philip coming on Monday, and Julian on Christmas Eve. 'Poor little Philip sounds wonderfully well' after his illness; expects he is still 'rather weak in the hind legs'. Robin and Nicola are also coming; there is a turkey, 'the first to have occurred for several years', and he thinks 'enough to drink'. Hopes Bob has a good, 'though probably a more tranquil Xmas'.

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