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Trevelyan, Julian Otto (1910-1988) artist
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Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

13 Princess Terrace, Balls Road, Birkenhead. - Congratulations on the birth of Trevelyan's son [Julian]. Comments on his own son [David, born 19 Dec 1909], to whom he reads poetry. Will send Trevelyan his new poem, "Mary and the Bramble", when he gets it back from Massingham. Has seen C. P. Scott and hopes to get work on his paper [the "Manchester Guardian"]; is giving up his regular journalism as he can't write poetry at the same time. Intends to move to the country, and asks if Trevelyan knows of any suitable house.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Hotel Rockville, Darjeeling. - This letter is for Julian and his Nannie, who must read it to him. Is high in the mountains, having come up on a 'little Indian train' of which he sends Julian a picture. Is leaving this afternoon, and will go via a train all night and then an Indian steamboat on a 'great river' for five hours, until he reaches an 'Indian house in an Indian village' where the people are all brown and 'speak in a funny way'. Nannie should choose a picture of the train, as well as having the one of 'the Nepaly mother with her baby in a basket', and Alice and Emily [servants?] should have the one of the mountains. Will return soon from China, when he will 'have to travel in a great Russian puff-puff... for ten days without stopping'. Julian must pass on a kiss to his mother, if she is at home.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Rome. - Has read Elizabeth's letter again, and sees that she needs to get 'some little establishment in Kensington' so Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] will be no use. Suggests asking Imogen [Booth?] and Maud, who may have a friend willing to let a little flat; hears lodgings in London are 'very trying'. Thinks it would be good for Julian, who 'knows only too well how important he is' and has tempers; asks if Elizabeth could get Dr [Carter?] to visit when he is upset to see if it has a physical cause. Mary [George and Janet's daughter] was much improved in temper when less in the nursery; thinks clever children need more to occupy themselves and therefore would suggest a 'nursery governess'. Charles visited the Montessori schools here and was impressed, though he thought success 'depended on the teacher'; suggests that Elizabeth go and see the class. Does not think they can get to England before 20 January. Reminds Elizabeth how bad the [London] fogs are that month. Returns to the letter next day, reporting that the doctor thinks she is getting on very well. They will only stay a night or two at Grosvenor Crescent; tells Elizabeth to contact Booa [Mary Prestwich], who is there now.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Julian is well; he says Wallington is 'a nice warm little house' whereas the Shiffolds is cold. He has gone to Cambo this morning; Charlie arrived yesterday and Mary, who was staying at Wallington, has gone home with him. Hopes Elizabeth's guests [Catherine Abercrombie and her baby?] are well and do not give her trouble. Asks if Robert is returning soon; he will find it dreary where he is if it rains. Sir George is well and very busy; good that his book is done. Graham has made Julian a 'little besom to sweep the leaves with'. Thinks Mrs Evans is good with him, but 'she is a talker'.

Letter from Marie Busch to R. C. Trevelyan

33 Ossington Street, Bayswater. - Sends the score and manuscript [her German translation of Trevelyan and Tovey's 'The Bride of Dionysus'] and asks Trevelyan to confirm receipt. Very good of Trevelyan to invite her to the Shiffolds again; would like to come, but finds it hard to make plans and fears she would not be able to help with recasting the poem. Would like to do some practical work, and has offered her help to one of the societies which tries to help 'foreign girls and women stranded here without friends owing to the war'; currently they have enough volunteers but may want more soon as 'the pressure of work is very heavy'. Would be a relief to do something. Feels that 'Germany has acted criminally and that she will have to suffer unspeakably for it'. Miss Weisse's conduct is 'extraordinary': for someone with heart disease to go into the 'middle of all the upset' sounds 'almost suicidal'. Asks to be remembered to Mr Tovey; is sorry that his plans for going abroad are now upset; he must be glad to have his Edinburgh work to look forward to. Sends love to Mrs Trevelyan and Julian.

Sheet of notes by Marie Busch on her translation of "The Bride of Dionysus".

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Gwalior Hotel. Gwalior. - Arrived here yesterday and leave tomorrow, probably for Ch[h]atarpur as guests of the Rajah, a 'great reader of Marie Corelli and Herbert Spencer'; hope to see a city near the capital where there are 'some fine Hindu temples' [Khajuraho?]. They are waiting from a letter from the Rajah and may not go at all; will go straight to Benares if so, then on to Gaya and Calcutta. They went up to the Fort this morning on an elephant; it is 'best to take a sea-sick remedy before starting', and he walked most of the way back. They saw some fine temples and a palace; the 'rock is rather like Orvieto, only larger' and the surrounding countryside is 'more beautiful' than North India usually seems to be. Tomorrow, they will be given a tour of the Maharaja's palace by his finance minister Sultan Ahmed Khan, a Muslim alumnus of Christ's Cambridge, who is married to an English lady. They have just heard from the Rajah of Chatarpur that he can be their host, so expects to reach Benares about Monday or Tuesday next week. Had a 'cheerful letter from Bessie' in the Netherlands by the last mail; the Bottomleys are 'comfortably settled in the Shiffolds'. Does not know when Bessie will go north again, but supposes she will fetch Julian back before long. Has been reading the [Robert Louis] Stevenson letters which his mother gave him; glad he kept them till now; thinks he likes the letters better than any of Stevenson's books. They make him want to be in England or on the Mediterranean 'a little too much', though he is having a 'splendid time' and is glad he came, since he 'certainly shall never come here again'. Still possible he may have a few weeks in Japan before his return, in which case they [he and Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson] would only stop a few days in China, at Hong Kong then Shanghai. Hopes the food at the Rajah's will be good, as they 'have not had very pleasant experience of Indian dinners so far'; he was quite ill after a dinner in Delhi. Sends love to his father and Julian; will write next mail from Benares.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Friends War Victims Relief Committee, A.P.O., S.5., B.E.F., France. - Thanks Julian his letter with the drawing; wonders whether it was of 'a donkey braying, or a Chinese imaginary animal bellowing'. Apologises for not managing to get a letter to Julian on his birthday; expects he is glad to be nine; wishes he himself could get a year younger instead of older on his next birthday. Has been for a short holiday to Nice, where it was not as warm as he had hoped; it took twenty-six hours by train to get there. Hopes to return to England around 20 March. Glad Julian likes school so much, and is now playing football; asks if he remembers them playing in front of the stable at home. Hears from Julian's mother that she had a nice visit to him last weekend.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Sorry to miss seeing Julian and Ursula; hopes they will have a good time at [?] Grunnock. He and Bessie had a good time at Wallington. Has not yet 'carried off the Botticelli Dante drawings' [see 12/28], though spoke to Charles; he was 'quite nice about it' though Bob thinks he rather likes the book being there. Has taken measurements to see if it will fit on the shelves at the Shiffolds, which he doubts; doesn't want to put it out on a table, and wonders whether Julian would like to have it in London. It had better stay at Wallington for the moment. Bessie comes home tomorrow, but will probably go to Wallington again in September. Wonders whether Julian has seen [Maria] Germanova again, and if he has found out if she is having difficulties with her rent. [Hasan Shahid] Suhrawardy has written him a 'disconsolate letter'; seemed to think it was unlikely he could come to Europe this year. Hopes to see Julian when he comes South. He and Bessie are probably visiting the [Donald] Toveys at Hedenham around the 25th. Thinks Bessie is 'very well'; she takes her breakfast in bed at half eight; Julian will have to have the '8 o clock breakfast at Wallington' if he goes there.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Flora Russell

Flora's postcard came when he was away for two months in the north, but he still should have replied sooner. Does indeed remember the 'expedition from Burrows Lea with the Russells to Leith Hill Tower'; he must have been about six, and chiefly remembers eating 'as many bilberries as [he] could' and being 'shamefully sick'. Would like to visit her soon, but they have guests at the moment; would much like to see Flora's French [lead] soldiers. She may have heard that Julian and Ursula have had a son, Philip, and all seems to be going well; Erasmus, his middle name, is a Darwin family name.

Letter from Leonore van Alphen to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Witte Huis. - The mild weather has turned to an 'old fashioned winter' so Arend [her son] has gone skating at Vinkeveen. Jan [her husband] has not yet been skating, but will do so when it turns less cold. He has been for a short stay in Mürren and Lauterbrunnen [Switzerland] as chef d'équipe of the Dutch students skiing group. Julie Graffman [her daughter] is staying here at the moment with her youngest child Sture; Holger [Julie's husband] is coming in about four days and they will all then travel to America. Six architects have also been staying, one of them Lucia [another daughter]'s husband [Van Ginkel]. Two of the architects are English - John Voelcker, and Peter Smithson, who knows Julian and 'thinks highly of him' - they are leaving tomorrow. All the architects love the Paddestoel [Lucia Hubrecht's house] and also think the Witte Huis 'very charming': how her aunt Bramine and Alphonse Grandmont 'knew how to live!', though she herself would like to be in Sicily [where Bramine Hubrecht and Alphonse Hubrecht also had a house] now for the winter. Sends her own love and that of Jan, who is sitting by the fire downstairs reading to Julie, Lucia, and the wife of a friend of Arend who works at the United Nations in America. Tante Liesje [?] is 'the same & well looked after'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry that Elizabeth is having so much trouble with Julian; expects he 'likes his old nurse best', and resembles Robert in not being able to 'bear a change'; unlucky that he is also unwell. Elizabeth need not worry about deciding whether they should visit Wallington yet. It is very cold, but the house is warm and comfortable; perhaps the doctor should be asked if the change of air would be good. Hopes C[harles] and M[ary] will cheer her up - they will be 'excited about politics' - and that Elizabeth will be able to keep Nurse Catt a while longer so that things can settle. Sir George is anxious that she should not feel 'bound' to come to Wallington. Sees that '[Bessie's] old Judge is ill, & his old Report coming out!'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Flora Russell

Thanks Flora for sending her verses, which are 'not doggerel; they are much too delicate and graceful for that, and have too much feeling'. Must be a 'very real recompense, to be able to call up the "pattern and the vision"... and still enjoy seeing it' though she no long tries to 'draw it'. Sorry he missed seeing her at the 'Maxes' [sic: Maxses?], who seem to have made themselves 'comfortably at home in Tillies cottage'; it is 'very pleasant having them as neighbours'.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

14, Rue Nungesser et Coli, Paris 16e. - Saw Julian yesterday, and was glad to hear that Bob had recovered; Julian did not come last week in case Suhrawardy had not recovered from his pneumonia, during which his temperature went up to over 107 which his doctor says 'only happens to savages'. He is now much better. Has seen a lot of his friends the Singhs, who have now gone to London. His father has written to say he will be in Europe in September, and he has also be offered a Readership at the Calcutta University, to give six lectures on 'Mussulman Art' over the winter, so he has decided to go to India with his father in November. The Singhs are taking on the flat in Pembridge Crescent at which Trevelyan came to see Suhrawardy at the end of this month. Might be in London at the beginning of June and would love to come and see the Trevelyans if so. Julian mentioned that Mrs Trevelyan had had to give up her trip to Holland because of illness; hopes it was nothing serious. Madame G[ermanova] sends her love; excuses herself for not writing, but they have no maid so she is doing a lot of housework. Her husband [Aleksandre Kalitinsky] is much better. Rex [the dog] loves the warm weather. Asks him to tell Mrs Trevelyan that most of his vegetable were eaten by hares.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad they can hope to see Elizabeth; thinks it is the best thing, especially as she is keeping Nurse Catt, which is very good news; the other nurse cannot have been very clever or she would have made friends with [Julian]. Charlie calls him 'a superb little chap'; he and Mary will be glad it is settled. Asks Elizabeth to tell Nurse Catt how glad she is she is staying, and that the north country air will do her good. Asks her to let Maria know when to expect them [at Grosvenor Crescent]; discusses travel arrangements. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter [Alice?] are visiting on the 24th, and some neighbours are coming to dinner, but otherwise they will be quiet. Geordie [George Lowthian Trevelyan] has recovered from chickenpox and the girls show no sign of it yet; they have not been to Wallington so Julian will be safe. Politics is very exciting; was 'very glad the Conference failed'. Elizabeth's Dutch paper has begun to arrive. Sure she has done the best thing about the nurse, even if Mrs Catt only stays a few months. Good for the Liberal party to have the R[ussell] Reas at Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst]; fears Elizabeth cannot fight the seat this time. Asks Elizabeth in a postscript to send a telegraph with their arrival day, as she may want to go to Newcastle.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

Is very touched by Trevelyan's dedication of his plays ["Three Plays: Sulla, Fand, The Pearl-Tree"] to him. It is his fault that Madame G[ermanova] did not send the receipt earlier, since he kept putting off his departure for England; now he will leave on Friday, taking the car on the wish of the Singhs with whom he is staying. Will be at 6, Carlton Mansions, Pall Mall S.W.(1), where he stayed with his father. Originally enclosing photographs for Mrs Trevelyan. Asks if Julian was there.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - News of Julian, who 'evidently thought that it was an innovation [sic] not to find [Elizabeth] in the library', and Sir George, who is slightly unwell; thinks 'the excitement of the election' has over-tired him. Tomorrow it is the Rothley treat, and the Cambo treat is on Thursday. Hopes Elizabeth is having a good time at Rounton [Grange, home of the Bells]; misses her and loved having her for such a long stay.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Asks if Julian and Ursula would mind if he [dedicated] his play "Fand" to them both [in his forthcoming "Collected Works"]; Julian will remember that it was acted at Boars Hill, Oxford, and Bob wanted him to paint a yew-tree for it but John Masefield preferred there to be no scenery. The previous play, the "Pearl Tree", is dedicated to [Hasan Shahid] Suhrawardy, and "Sulla" to Gordon Luce. Is dedicating his first book of poems ["Mallow and Asphodel"] to Bessie since he is not reprinting his first play ["Cecilia Gonzaga"], 'which was hers'. Hoping to see Julian on Saturday; Desmond [MacCarthy] should be there.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry that the journey to Rounton was 'so agitating'. Mary has written to say the wedding went well; Elizabeth's account is amusing. Expects she misses Julian, but they are glad to have him for a little longer at Wallington; he has been playing with his toys then was happy for Hearne [the butler] to carry him upstairs. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert have a good Christmas Day; asks to be remembered to the Enticknaps; hopes Gussie got home safely. Will be nice if Elizabeth comes to fetch Julian on Thursday. Sir George says there is a good review of Mrs [Janet] Ross in the "Nation"; she hopes Robert will lend her the book ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence"]

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Dr [Karl] Bluth has telephoned to say he has been to see Ursula, and 'all is going as well as can be expected'. They are very relieved; thinks Bessie is writing to Ursula. Is afraid it has been a 'very worrying time', but hopes this will 'get rid of the trouble for good and all'. Bessie has not been well today, but Bob thinks it is 'nothing much'. Alice [Elms?]'s operation seems to have been successful.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Rome. - Is still not sure where he will be at Easter, as he has not yet fixed when accounts with the peasants will be settled. Gives directions for reaching Metelliano from Florence; Nicky [Mariano] will be able to help. He, Tonino and Ebe, the house and the dog will all be happy to see Trevelyan and Julian. Has one last query about Trevelyan's brother's book [G.M. Trevelyan, "English Social History"] for his translation

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Originally enclosing three publicity notices for the "Abinger Chronicle" for Julian and Ursula to distribute to possible subscribers, such as Imogen [Gore-Browne?]; they should avoid people likely to be on Oliver [Lodge], Bob, [E.M.] Forster or Sylvia [Sprigge]'s lists. Max [Beerbohm] and Forster are both contributing to the Christmas number; does not think he himself will have anything ready. Bessie has a persistent cold, but he hopes she will soon get away to Hove for a few days. Hopes that Diana [Brinton-Lee?]'s 'expedition' was successful. Is trying to write an 'epistle in Alexandrines' to B.B. [Bernard Berenson], but it is 'rather uphill work'; quotes Pope ["Essay on Criticism"]. Tom S[turge] M[oore] is 'fairly all right', though Marie is still in Paris.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

20 Marmion Rd., Sefton Park, Liverpool. - Abercrombie and his brother Pat have been asked to report to the corporation of Stratford upon Avon on possible industrial development. It seems that the Welcombe estate will be involved, and he asks whether Trevelyan's father (or son Julian) would like to express an opinion. The Abercrombies will be at Stratford the following week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry for late letters: the posts are 'much disorganised'; has sent a telegram by the nurse who is taking Julian out in the pony cart; gives news of the child. Glad the R[ussell] Reas are friendly; sure they will be pleasant neighbours. Sir George is well again, and has been round with her 'to give presents & talk to the people', who all seemed to be enjoying Christmas.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Ursula Trevelyan and Julian Trevelyan, with copy of poem by Wang Yi

Thanks them for the lychees, apologies for not giving them a present. Has not yet opened the tin, but has opened his book of Wang I [Yi] and read his poem about the lychee tree, which he copies on another page, so knows what to expect. Asks Ursula to thank her father for his 'charming letter'. Hopes Julian was able to come for Christmas and was all right. Tet Htoot was meant to come yesterday, but went to Oakley, near Maidenhead, instead of Ockley; hopes he will arrive in time for the turkey.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Is very happy to hear Trevelyan might be coming; hopes he will be home as he has no important engagements in Rome in summer or early autumn; he could also come to Vallombrosa. His account will be at Trevelyan's disposal for the books, as long as Trevelyan gives a fortnight's notice of his or his friends' arrival. Recommends a few pensions in Florence, but knows little about Rome, and suggests asking Sylvia [Sprigge]. Hopes Julian is recovering, and that Trevelyan's 'domestic troubles may be resolved'; sends love to Bessie. Had a 'charming and most flattering letter' from Trevelyan's brother about his translation [G. M. Trevelyan, "English Social History"].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to hear that Julian is settled in his own nursery again; sure he remembers it 'as he notices so much'. Very glad that nurse [Mrs Catt] is really better, and hopes all will go well now. She and Sir George are settling down at Welcombe; they are alone till George and Janet come on Wednesday. Sir George says Elizabeth 'must not mind about paying'. Sends love to Bob, and says she 'will read the Medici letters [edited by Janet Ross] with much interest'. She and Sir George did not like the Post impressionists [the exhibition organised by Roger Fry at the Grafton Galleries] which 'leave the impression of a bad, & rather nasty dream, though [she] can see how clever some of it is'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Begins the letter 'Dear as a daughter', which she says was used by 'an old Medici lady' in the book Robert has lent her ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence", by Janet Ross], which she finds interesting but has not yet finished. Annie [Philips] is here and seems well. Is more or less recovered from her 'little feverish attack'. Glad to have good news of Julian. Asks if Elizabeth can send back 'the Shetland scarf' if she is not using it, as it 'does not look as "invalidy" as a shawl'; glad she is better. The 'A.S's' [Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick], Janet and George 'amalgamated well'. Asks if Elizabeth's maids have recovered, and hopes the nurse [Mrs Catt] is sleeping better. Miss Richardson is here and is going with TitBits [the horse] 'to see sights accompanied by Annie's maid'. Sir George was very pleased to get Robert's letter; he has had a correspondence 'with "the master" [of Trinity, Cambridge, Montagu Butler?] on classical things'.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

61 Ripon St., Calcutta. - Thanks Trevelyan for his letter: thinks the changes have improved the lines [of a poem?]. Berenson is right about the pronunciation of Yudhishthira. Is very grateful to Trevelyan for having spoken to C.A. [Clifford Allen]. Is finding life hard in India, faced with the 'Victorian dogmatism' which most of the intellectuals affect, with a 'kind of religious mysticism for the sake of the reputation of the country'; human beings are not valued as human beings. Finds the country itself very beautiful though: has been to Ajunta, Ellora, Delhi, Agra, Jaipur and Lucknow; likes Hyderabad best. Is currently with the Singhs at Bahagalpur, since his father is away from Calcutta. Sees the League [of Nations] as his 'only salvation'; supposes that Allen is right and after the Reparations Conference there will be less economic tension and more posts available. Was nearly appointed to a post in the Information Department of the Secretariat in 1929, supported by Lord Lytton and Harold Williams of the "Times", a close friend because of 'shared Moscow experiences'; Williams' untimely death meant that the High Commissioner's brother got the post. Since then every post has gone to Indians in Geneva, even if they are less well qualified. Feels he will have to stay in India and get some temporary post, to lift cares from his friends in Paris [the Germanova / Kalitinsky household]; hears Julian is going to paint a fresco in their rooms, 'with Osny as the background and Rex [the dog] as the chief motif'; is so glad he visits them.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Intended to send a small book of his "Translations from Leopardi", but then decided to wait until Julian and Ursula next come here, as they 'might easily lose it moving about'. Pity they cannot come now, when the flowers in the woods are at their best. All quite well here; the [Sturge] Moores will return in a month. Originally enclosing, on Bessie's request, a photograph of 'the street in Forest Green that [Julian] used to admire'. The Bluths and Tet Htoot were here at Easter, but otherwise they 'seem to see nobody'. Hopes that Tet Htoot will bring two Chinese friends to visit. A 'bad London raid last night'; hopes he and the Bluths are all right; Irene [Cooper Willis?] has fortunately been away. Has very few friends in London now besides these, Logan [Pearsall Smith] and Alys [Russell]. Virginia [Woolf]'s death 'a great blow'; she 'felt she was going out of her mind again and could not face it'. Is re-reading "To the Lighthouse", his favourite of her books; is writing something on her for the "Abinger Chronicle", but it is 'impossible to say anything adequate in the way of criticism'. Forgets whether Julian knew her. Is continuing to translate Montaigne and getting 'a little bored with it'; 'much more fun writing poetry, even if it is not worth much'. Hopes Julian has managed to see Ursula at Taunton, and that she is well again. Has heard from G.M.T. [his brother George] that Charles is giving Wallington to the National Trust now instead of leaving it in his will; he will continue to live there, and one of the family (probably his son George Lowthian) will stay there after his death; this will save on death-duties so there will be much more money for the children. Supposes this should not be discussed until it is announced. Hopes Bessie will go with Miss Simpkins for a few days to George and Janet next month; otherwise she never 'goes away from here, which is not good for her'.

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