Showing 3 results

Archival description
Millin, Terence John (1903-1980) surgeon
Print preview View:

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Has consulted Mr Williams [about prostate trouble], but not had a surgical examination as he only conducts these in a nursing home. Liked Williams very much; is still unhappy about the idea of the operation; there is no chance of cancer; encloses correspondence for her to see. Would like to visit on Tuesday. Ackerley recommends 'one Mellin [?] who does dia-thermoid [?] treatment': thinks this was the treatment Goldie [Dickinson] was unable to have.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Will not be able to come to lunch due to work on the house; hopes she had a good weekend at Littlehampton. Has sent off the index [to his biography of Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson] and just has the revised proofs to correct. Mrs Hardy has suggested that he edit her husband's letters to Mrs [Florence] Henniker; would have liked the job but feels he has done 'enough memorialising for the present' and will only do it if the pay is good. Terence Millin is the surgeon who uses diathermy; if Bessie sees her friend she could ask about him. Ackerley heard about him from his GP, Wadd of Richmond; Forster is sceptical; thanks Bessie for sympathy and support. Hopes to go to some of the Busch concerts.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

W[est] H[ackhurst]. - Wonders if Bob suffered from sick headaches when having prostate trouble: does not think Goldie [Dickinson] did. Is going to consult Terence Millin, a doctor who uses diothermic treatment, though will not arrange to be treated without an outside opinion - on Millin himself if possible. May go on to MacDonald, about whom Bessie informed him via Mr Hutchinson, though is not optimistic about orthodox surgery. His mother knows something about it, and seems to be a little worried but not too much. He worries about 'the bits of work' he hasn't finished off: he has been so happy in his friends, particularly recently, that he does not feel he has '"missed" private relationships'. Hasn't seen Julian's pictures yet, nor the Chinese ones [the 1935-1936 International Exhibition of Chinese Art at the Royal Academy], but he and Bob may do both on Thursday. Malcolm Darling is back. Is trying to think of a title for his collected essays [Abinger Harvest]: asks if Bessie or Bob have any suggestions.