Showing 49 results

Archival description
Papers of W. K. Clifford Pollock, Sir Frederick (1845–1937) 3rd Baronet, jurist
Print preview View:

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

Trinity College, Cambridge.—Sends some lithographed notes on analytical geometry. Has been told that they cannot become Masters of Arts till next term. Jokes about Pollock's hat, and refers to Auerbach’s Spinoza, the new [edition of] Shelley, and Sidgwick's interpretation of one of Myers's poems.

(Marked 'Jan. 1870'.)

Postcard from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

[Cambridge.]—Cautions him against being transported by the grandeur of Greece, and refers to Geldart’s book on modern Greek. Is irritated that he has to give lessons for the ‘Little-go’.

(Postmarked at Cambridge, 19 Oct. 1870.)

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

St John’s College, Cambridge.—Discusses Pollock’s review of Morris [The Earthly Paradise, Part III]. Huxley has been at Cambridge, stirring up the young Christian men. The Society voted against the extension of the ‘Cont. dis.’[?] Acts last night. Suggests that divorce should be made as easy as marriage, and that polyandry should be made respectable.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

Trinity College, Cambridge.—Prefixes a poem about the grief of a mother for her dead son [in response to an actual event]. Has not yet sent in his Royal Institution abstract. Is going to London for the funeral today. Responds to Pollock’s comments on various mathematical and philosophical ideas [i.e. those discussed in A3/4].

Letter from W. K. Clifford to [Frederick Pollock]

(Place of writing not indicated.)—Has been working with Lockyer on molecules and talking metaphysics with Huxley. Refers to his ‘sermon’ [perhaps ‘Right and Wrong’ or ‘The Ethics of Belief’] on ‘the right and wrong of admitting the results of the scientific method in certain ground which it has already occupied’.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to [Frederick Pollock]

9 Park Place, Hills Court, Exeter.—Has been ‘by stealth’ to a Unitarian chapel, where Sir John Bowring spoke on the subject of religious progress beyond Christianity. Presents some humorous aphorisms on women [in French].

(Marked ‘circ. 1870’.)

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

Hôtel Central, 12 Rue des Feuillants, [Marseilles].—The city is noisy but amusing. He liked Bordeaux and would like to see more of Lyons, but they were driven from Avignon by the bugs. Has just recovered from an attack of constipation. Describes a climbing expedition with Lucy. Is thinking of learning some Arabic and visiting Algeria.

(With envelope.)

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

(Place of writing not indicated.)—Pollock should certainly consult his fiancée about the length of their engagement. Sends some lines, ‘about three years old’, which were meant to begin his play Lassalle, and explains why he is thinking of taking it up again. States the terms of business of the Birkbeck Bank. Has been to see Le Roi Carotte [by Offenbach] with Moulton.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

(Place of writing not indicated.)—Is delighted [by the news of Pollock’s engagement]. Is studying energy and reading Kant, Aristotle, and Noah Porter [The Human Intellect]. Croom Robertson is going to marry Miss Crompton. Refers to the mathematical volume published in commemoration of the marriage of Camilla Brioschi.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Georgina Pollock

Belfast.—Before he came to the British Association meeting he and Lucy went to see her parents at Worthing. Refers humorously to the way in which he raised the subject of their marriage with her father. Tyndall, Spencer, and Huxley were delighted with Fred’s letter. Has been with Corfield and Atchison to hear Jellett lecture. Sends sympathies to Fred's legs.

(With envelope.)

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

Exeter.—Asks about his legs, and responds to his remarks on the ‘Green Grosery’ [Green and Grose’s edition of Hume’s Treatise on Human Nature]. Lucy has been to Aberdeen to try to save her sister [Isabel] from going into an Anglican convent.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

26 Colville Road, [Bayswater].—Discusses a paper relating to rectilinear motion. Has nearly finished enumerating the types of compound statement with four terms. Huxley is preparing to lecture on Spinoza. Suggests that the law against contracts to find treasure by magic should be applicable to mediums.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

26 Colville Road, [Bayswater].—It would do him more harm than good to give up his college work next term. He has already improved under Andrew Clark’s treatment, and is about to take a fortnight's holiday. They [he and Lucy] will spend the summer in the Mediterranean and the Pyrenees.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

Algiers.—Asks after the baby and her mother, and commends the choice of name. Outlines a scheme for the education of children, which he has partly communicated to Macmillan [the publishers]. Will write to Milady [Lady Pollock].

Letter from Georgina Pollock to Lucy Clifford

24 Bryanston Street, W.—Discusses the Cliffords’ health and movements. The doctors do not think that Willi should return to England yet. She and Fred think of coming to join them, perhaps with the children. Gives news of their present activities and engagements.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

Monte Generoso, [Mendrisio, Switzerland].—It is very cold. Gives an account of their travels since they left Malta. Refers to a review by [P. G.] Tait. Hopes that the news from Belgium ‘has given all the cardinals the stom-ach-ache’.

Letter from W. K. Clifford to [Frederick Pollock]

Washington Irving Hotel, Granada.—Modifies his previous remarks about the Spanish people. Describes a case of murder at Granada, and refers to the prevalence of violence in the province as a whole. It is expected that there will be a revolution soon. Gives a brief opinion of the Alhambra. Asks about Pollock’s work, and suggests he translate Spinoza.

(With envelope.)

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

[Funchal, Madeira.]—Entrusts the education of his children to Pollock and Huxley, desiring them to be brought up without any knowledge of ‘theological hypotheses’. Expresses his love for his wife, and sends love to members of the Pollock family.

(With envelope. According to Fisher Dilke, this letter was written ‘twenty minutes or so’ before Clifford’s death.)

Letter from James Knowles to Frederick Pollock

The Hollies, Clapham Common, S.W.—Is distressed to hear how ill Clifford is. All at the Metaphysical Society like him, and Cardinal Manning, on hearing the news, wrote out the enclosed cheque immediately. Encloses a cheque of his own

Letter from Henry Jackson to Frederick Pollock

Croft Cottage, Barton Road, Cambridge.—Will try and raise subscriptions for Clifford among the residents [of Cambridge]. George Darwin has gone abroad for the sake of his health, so Pollock may not receive a reply from him. Will reply soon about the Women’s Education Union. His wife is gaining strength. Will tell him about current schemes for collegiate reform when they meet.

(With envelope.)

Letter from Lucy Clifford to Frederick Pollock

11 Portsea Place, Connaught Square, W.—Has sent for a copy of Little People and will copy out the ‘lily song’ [see A2/7]. Is anxious for him to bring out certain aspects of her husband’s personality [in his memoir]. Has been trying to comfort herself with ideas of a future consciousness. Mrs Deffell is concerned that the Pollocks are not enjoying their holiday.

(With envelope.)

Results 1 to 30 of 49