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Additional Manuscripts c Butler, Henry Montagu (1833–1918), college head
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Letter from Sir Henry Maine to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that he had postponed writing to Sidgwick until he returned to the India Office in order 'to be able to review the state of official business', and that he had come to London the previous day. Refers to the fact that between his election to 'the [Whewell] Professorship and the present time', he had not resigned his membership of the India Council, and had 'prepared and delivered a course of lectures on International Law.' Explains that his intention was 'to prevent any inconvenience to the Secretary of State.' Announces that the India Office now require his further assistance or services, and that there is one piece of business involving the proposed reorganisation of the Public Service in India, his withdrawal from which 'might certainly embarrass the Secretary of State seriously.' Refers to the government of India, and to the 'educated Natives' of the country, who take an interest in politics, and more specifically, 'in the system by which public employment is distributed.' States that he was involved in the formation of a powerful Commission to investigate the subject, and that he has had much correspondence unofficially with some of the Commissioners 'and latterly with Lord [Dufferin].' Explains that the Commissioners are now preparing their report, which will shortly be before the India Office.

Asks Sidgwick his opinion on the wisdom of he [Maine] asking Sidgwick to mention to those involved [in appointing Maine to the Professorship] that he proposed to retain his seat in Council, until the above questions are disposed of. Owns to be taken aback by the opinions which Sidgwick has reported to him. Announces that he returns to Cambridge that night, and that before leaving he wrote to the Master of Trinity [Henry Montagu Butler], explaining to him why he had not as yet acted further on his advice.

Maine, Sir Henry James Sumner (1822-1888) Knight, jurist

Letters from Agnata Butler to [A. G. W.] Murray

Two letters, one concerning portraits of pupils of William Hopkins [possibly portraits by Thomas Charles Wageman, shelfmark 307.bb.85.98], the other concerning the donation of her husband [H. M. Butler]'s books to the Library.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to J. Peile

Sends to a draft of his reply, Compulsory Classics to the statement 'on the other side' [on the issue of allowing of alternatives for one of the classical languages in the Previous Examination; included]. Claims that it will require 'some little enlargement', but that they have agreed that 'it is best to get several people to write', and states that he is trying to get [H. M.?] Butler to do so. Adds that it was agreed that the statement should appear as [by] Henry Sidgwick', and states that he is waiting until the statement from the opposition is published.

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900) philosopher

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Apologises for having neglected to write to him. Declares that her time at Wellington College has passed pleasantly, but has been devoid of incident. Refers to Minnie's happiness with Edward, and to her domestic activities. Remarks that Edward, although not ill now, needs rest. Looks forward to 'the happy Rugby Xmas', and declares that she is glad she kept on the house there. Is very glad that Henry will be at home all the vacation, and hopes that he will ask [A. J.] Patterson to come. Explains that during the latter half of the vacation Edward and Minnie and William will be gone, and suggests that he invites his friends then. States that she will ask William about his friends when she passes through Oxford the following Thursday, when she is to meet Lucy Brown and lunch with her in William's rooms.

Reports that Mr [Francis?] Martin has just been [at Wellington College], and told her that Henry is looking 'remarkably well'. Adds that she thinks that Henry should be doing lighter work. Tells him not to let Arthur work too hard. Reports that William was at Wellington College that previous Sunday, looking very well. Refers to 'the appointment [of H. M Butler as new headmaster] to Harrow', and remarks that '26 sounds very young', but that she hears that Butler 'is a very fit man.' Is glad to hear that Henry comes home on 15 [December]. Asks him to give the enclosed [not included] to Arthur.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Is very glad that Henry [and Arthur] are coming home [to Rugby] the following week 'to warm this cold empty house.' Reports that she is well, but that she hears that Minnie has a cold. Refers to imminent weddings: Mr Smythies. and Miss I. Anstey; Miss Atty and an Indian gentleman [i.e a British army officer who has served in India]; Miss [Sale] and 'a Mr. Smith'; and Miss Wratislaw. Urges to bring some copies of the photograph he mentioned, as she wants them for her self, and also for their 'old servant Hannah', who she hopes will come for Christmas. Asks if there is a photograph of Isaac [Barns]. Is pleased to hear of Arthur. Asks if he got Margaret's wedding cards from [Riddlesdon], and states that she 'really became "Mrs Cooper" on that day'. Saw Miss Attersoll at Wellington College; refers to her views on young headmasters. Adds that she hears that Mr Butler's appointment [as headmaster of Harrow] is very satisfactory. Refers to A. J. Patterson's impending visit. Asks Henry to thank Arthur for his letter, and to tell him 'to fix about his visit to Lee Warner' when he comes to Rugby. Also asks him to bring Arthur's certificate for the exhibition home.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letters replying to invitations to Trinity College feasts

146 letters, most of them replies to invitations to dinner, with a few concerning arrangements to stay in rooms in College for the night, sent to the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, or specifically to Henry Montagu Butler, John Walton Capstick, Hugh McLeod Innes, or William Aldis Wright. An original letter of invitation may be found as part of item 65.

Thirteen of the letters concern other matters related to Trinity College business, as described below.
Items 9-11: Blomfield, Sir Arthur William. Asks to use the College Hall for lunch for the Royal Academy Club annual excursion, June 1899
Item 19: Dalzell, Robert Harris Carnwath, 11th Earl of Carnwath. 7 Jan. 1899. Remittance for fees, deducting a fine incurred by his son which should be paid for by the culprit
Item 40: Devonshire, Duke of. Undated. Contribution to the Trinity College, Cambridge Mission Appeal.
Items 61-62: Jebb, Sir Richard Claverhouse. 1896, 1898. Encloses payment for his subscription to the Trinity College Mission and the Cambridge House
Item 84: Parry, Sir Charles Hubert Hastings, 1st Baronet. 1898. Encloses payment for dues
Items 100-101: Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred. 25 Mar. and 1 May 1899, encloses lists of students and other women from Newnham who would like to attend the Rayleigh lecture
Item 108: Stanton, Vincent Henry. 3 Sept. n.y. Concerning the opening times of the Trinity College Library
Item 123: Webster, Richard Everard, 1st Viscount Alverstone. 19 July 1897. Encloses cheque for subscription.
Item 125: Westlake, John. 28 Nov. 1898. To Capstick, asks for questions from the General Question paper

One letter appears to be personal, not Trinity College business: item 90, sent to John William Capstick by Georg Hermann Quincke 15 July 1896, who writes about electric currents, citing articles, and describing his overcrowded laboratory (in German).

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