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Sidgwick, William Carr (1834-1919), fellow and tutor at Merton College, Oxford
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Thinks that his illness was due to something he ate. Declares that he enjoyed his visit to [London], and sent an account of the visit to [ ]. Reports that Mr Wheatley [his godfather] was very kind to the. Declares that he would like to see Miss Green [his former governess] if his mother can induce her to stay until he [and his brother William] come home. Refers to his mother's advice about his chess playing and assures her that he has not played more that five games 'since the beginning of the quarter...' Asks her to buy something for [his friend] Harry James out of his money. Explains how they were 'got into the 2nd class in German', and in relation to the play declares that they do not have to translate it themselves. Sends his love to all at home, 'including Elizabeth [Cooper]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he sent off 'a solace' for her loneliness the previous day. Regrets that there is no chance of his seeing his aunt before he goes abroad. Hopes to be able to go and see her at the end of the Long [vacation]. Undertakes not to come home until he is forced, 'unless [he] can speak German properly'. Announces that he leaves Cambridge for London the following day, where he intends to meet some friends. Reports that his three weeks in Cambridge have not been spent quite as he could wish, but admits that they have been profitable. Hopes that she will like Plato, and tells her to attribute whatever she dislikes in the work to Whewell's mistranslations. Declares that he is glad to hear of her walking, and hopes that she won't overdo it. Thanks her for the ghost story [cf 101/146], and reports that he had had two at first hand by letter from a clergyman. Sends his love to William.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Reports on how his days are spent. Mentions William's visit to his family home. Is glad to hear his mother's good account of Minnie. Reports that he had a letter from Edward [Benson] some days previously; believes him not to be 'the right man in the right place', and thinks of him as 'thrown away' in his role as headmaster. In relation to a proposed stay at Sydenham declares himself to be 'tolerably indifferent', and states that he only wants to be able to see her and have the opportunity of quiet study. Thinks however that it might be a bore 'going and settling down for a short time [especially Xmas time] in a place' where they know nobody and have no introductions. Asks if her idea includes Edward and Minnie. Gives his own ideas in relation to how the time should be spent; 'paying visits vaguely and spending the rest of the time at Cambridge', and a week or so at Rugby. His idea, however, does not include William. Admits that he would enjoy being near London. Reports that Arthur is very well 'under his gymnastics' Announces that he is going on Tuesday to stay a night with a friend 'who has been among the D[ ] and [ ]'. Informs her that there is a little book about the latter by Lord Carnarvon. Asks if she has seen Dr [Joseph?] Wolff's life.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he will come down with Arthur on the 22nd [December]. States that William talks of coming to see him for two days 'on the Saturday'. Declares that his work is over, and that he is 'grinding' at Arabic and ethnology. His friends are 'all coming up from the different schools and it is very jolly'. Replies that she should not get him a ticket for the concert since he does not know if he shall come until the evening. Intends to bring his Arabic home with him. Reports that he has read Prehistoric Man [by Daniel Wilson?], but wasn't very impressed with it, and announces that there are 'some interesting scientific books expected by Lyall and Huxley, bearing on Primæval Man'. States that he looks forward to seeing Miss [Lucy?] Brown.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Paris]:- Gives an account of a wedding he attended recently. Refers to Roden Noel, whom he met in the Louvre. Claims to be enjoying Paris very much, and likes the Tuileries and the Champs Elysées 'as much as ever.' Admits not to be attracted by France as much as by Germany, and gives his impressions of Paris and of the French people. Thinks that he will leave Paris 'on Monday week', but may stay a day or two longer. Reports that Arthur is to leave on Thursday. Hopes that William is recovered from his attack.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Anxious to receive news from her after her arrival at Fulford. Hopes that she will be able to stay as long as she wishes. Does not know when he shall get down to Rugby, or how long he shall stay, but states that his stay there 'will include Sunday the 5th'. Reports that he has seen Roche Dakyns, who was in Cambridge to take his M.A. degree. Reports that he went to Oxford the previous Saturday, saw William, and enjoyed himself very much. Remarks on the contrast between Oxford and Cambridge in respect of the more vibrant intellectual life in the former. Attributes this to the hot controversies that are always raging there.

States that he is inclined to agree with her about the new mastership at Rugby, and claims that the only doubt is what Arthur will do. Does not think that he will be sorry to have more time to read, and hopes that he will decide to stay in Cambridge. Reports that he has saved one thousand seven hundred pounds, and hopes to save four hundred a year as long as he stays in Cambridge. States that he dined at the Lodge the previous night 'and Lady Affleck [Everina Whewell or Maria Affleck?] enquired very kindly after Minnie'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Göttingen]: - Reports that his days consist of reading Arabic and speaking German, and that on Sundays he goes for long walks with a Prussian student of Sanskrit; he is 'a most amiable-looking man, and you would take him for an Englishman'. Wishes that he could introduce her to Professor Ewald, as he is sure that she would like him. Believes that Ewald lengthened his lectures half an hour for Henry's sake, and reports that he has promised to give him private lessons during September.

Expects Graham Dakyns to come to spend a few days in the Harz at the end of the week. Announces that he intends to go to a 'Philologer-assembly', like the one he went to three years ago, in Hanover in just over a month's time. States that his health is good, and expects that he shall be quite well at the end of the Long Vacation. Discusses his diet and alcohol consumption: if anyone asks her whether he is turning into a 'beer-drinking German', she can truthfully say he has 'not drunk above three glasses' since arriving here. An English visitor to his host family told them that Henry's brother [William] was a 'distinguished wit... in Oxford'.

Mentions that Arthur had told him of his acceptance of the Rugby mastership, and admits that he has taken 'a prudent, perhaps a wise course'. Is glad that his mother's stay at Rugby will be so much pleasanter and hopes that it will turn out to be 'really not Rheumatic.' Suggests that if it is, she might move for a couple of months at the worst time of the year. Declares that he was much interested by her letter, and that he shall be glad of 'any news that is going.' Asks her to remind Arthur to enquire for him the exact day they go back at Cambridge. Hopes that she will succeed in getting a house. Asks why so many people are leaving, and if it has transpired what the [ ] said to Dr Temple's report. Regrets that she has no better account of his aunt Lace.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he had 'a most delightful visit to Dorsetshire'. Tells her that she may tell Arthur 'that the mesmerizing did not come to much', as '[Charles Kegan] Paul did not succeed in getting Cowell any further than [Henry] had done, i.e. into a partial trance.' Reports that he felt his patriotism revive 'among the chalk downs and rich autumnal parks.' Remarks that he was surprised to find that Mrs Paul, 'who has written two or three tolerably popular novels is a rather quiet shy silent person - though very thoughtful and sensible when she does speak.'

Encloses the stamps [not included] of which he spoke in previous letters, and agrees with her as to the best way of getting the others. Announces that he will study the [Robert?] Browning, and that he is setting to work, although he does not feel so much inclined for reading as he should after a holiday. Asks his mother to give his love to his aunt [Elizabeth Lace], and states that he is glad that she is going to see her. Asks when William is going to be at Rugby at Christmas, and asks if he may bring a friend or two some time in the holidays. Understands that Arthur will be 'Europeanizing.' Observes that Mr Martin seems much better, although he looks ten years older. Hopes to see William in the middle of term. States that he does not like the moral and intellectual atmosphere at Cambridge any better for having been at Göttingen, or at least its effects on him; says however that 'the great lesson' he has learned in Germany is 'the necessity and duty of steady work, and one can do that anywhere'.

Reports that he is reading all kinds of books. Asks if she gets books now from a club, and if so, recommends the article on Poland in Vacation Tourists [and Notes on Travel].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Wellington College]:- Reports that he is 'revelling in idleness and hot weather and unbending [his] mind in female society'. Reports that he left Clifton the previous day. Declares that the work was 'so appallingly hard' that he had not time to call on anybody. Maintains that he enjoyed it nonetheless. Hopes to go to his uncle Robert's on the Thursday of the following week, then on to A[ ]cliffs, Biddlesden, Leeds, and 'a flying visit to Halifax.' Asks her opinion of Stone-Gappe. States that he must be in Cambridge again by the end of the month, as he has much reading to do. Announces that he will come to her when he wants to relax slightly. Knows that the atmosphere 'will be too industrious to allow [him] to do more.' Hopes that she won't be too anxious about William's improvement.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to send 'the Portfolio'; notes that he always leaves something behind. Sends Bishop Westcott's book [not included], which he hopes she will like. States that he had already decided not to go in for the Professorship of Moral Philosophy when he learnt that F. D. Maurice was a candidate. Believes that the latter has the best chance. Predicts that he will be 'a stimulating lecturer', and hopes that he will be a very good appointment, as Cambridge is currently 'in some need of stimulus'; is 'rather sorry' for his friend Venn, who is 'thoroughly of the new school' of which Dr Lightfoot is the most distinguished representation.

Reports that he transmitted his mother's books to Mrs Peile in person, and that the Peiles were in Göttingen 'during the excitement of the change of dynasty in September.' Also reports that they say that all the professional element of society 'rejoiced strongly in the transference', but that the householding element was not very happy about having to entertain a number of Prussian soldiers; the chief discontent being in Hanover. Declares that their hall [at Trinity College] is 'resplendent', and the 'undergraduates call it the "Alhambra"'; the college have introduced 'the disgraceful luxury of chairs' there. Regrets to hear about William, and hopes that he will come over [to Cambridge] soon.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Informs her that he has been trying to procure for her a novel by Mrs Paul, but has lost his copy and cannot find a copy in the University Library. Promises to get one for her 'some way or other.' Is glad that she is enjoying herself and is amused to hear of William's decorations. Fears that he will not be able to go to Oxford that term, but hopes to see William at the end of it. Claims not to have inclination to taking much trouble with his temporary accommodation. Remarks that 'a bachelor making himself comfortable seems...an incongruous thing.' Observes that fellows of colleges have a tendency to become lazy and luxurious, and states that he does not intend to be the latter. Remarks that William 'is not lazy or luxurious'. Apologises for boring her with a 'dull and egotistical discourse'.

Declares that he enjoyed his visit to London; 'every moment was filled up with something delightful.' Remarks that 'the happiness of life does depend on intellectual sympathy' to him, and that when he gets 'a good deal of it at once', such as during a London holiday, 'one seems to live a good deal in the time'; notes that if one lived among the same people one would get less of it.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announced that he has decided to come to Rugby the week after the following week, instead of the following Thursday, as he had originally intended. States that he wishes to dine with his editor at Harrow on the following Saturday and see his friends there. Reports that Montagu Butler has been seriously ill, but is getting better. Is very sorry to hear about Mary, and asks for a better account to be sent as soon as she can. Also regrets to read her report of William, and states that he has no time to go and see him.

Regrets that he is not able to work as hard as he should like. Declares that he should have given himself a longer complete holiday during that long vacation. Reports on the work he has done. Thought that he 'should have got further towards explaining Spiritualism, one way or another'; however, 'it gives life an additional interest having a problem of such magnitude still to solve'. Asks his mother's opinion on the Bishop's address, and remarks that he thought it was 'exceedingly well composed on the whole'. Professes to be becoming more interested in ecclesiastical matters from reading English history. Sends his love to Mary and Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets to hear of the unfavourable circumstances under which she made her visit to London [see Mary Sidgwick's letter, ADD.MS.c/101/179]. Reports that he has made himself rather ill 'by knocking about to Oxford and London from 13th to 15th' and has been keeping very quiet in Cambridge ever since. Intends to go to London for a few days before he goes to Rugby.

Reports that he just saw the Royal Academy, referring to the work of Leighton, Millais and Brett, and declaring it on the whole to be a bad exhibition. Announces that his friend Charles Bernard and his wife are now in England, and asks his mother if she would like him to ask him 'to run down to Rugby' while Henry is there and stay for a day or so. Reports that he saw William in Oxford on 13 June, and that he seemed very well. Indicates that they may meet in Switzerland. States that he is working now, and is very well. Tells her to keep the MSS as long as she likes; does not know if they will interest her, though he finds them interesting 'as all details of one's own mental life are. One grows old in Cambridge very fast...' Comments on the fact that [Jex]-Blake has been elected principle of Cheltenham [College]. Remarks that he will prosper, and states that he does not feel quite sure that Farrar would, although he would have felt more interested in trying the experiment with Farrar.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets to say that he will not see William the following week. Reports that the latter has written to say that he does not feel well enough to come to the 'Ad Eundem'. Informs her that the marmalade has arrived, 'and is very nice.' Asks her to tell Arthur that they 'lost "the whole ticket" at the elections to Council.' Does not think that it will much matter, and states that '[t]he questions which are coming to the front now in Academic affairs are not of a party character.' Regrets to see that the same state of affairs does not exist 'in the metropolis: and that the worst features of Parliamentary Elections are to be introduced into the Elections of school-boards in the Metropolis'. States that he allowed his name to be put on Miss [Garrett]'s committee for Marylebone. Has learnt that the elections are to cost about £1,000 per candidate, and Miss [Garrett], 'standing on principles of peculiar p[ ] will only spend £500.' Adds that it is 'a terrible waste of money.' Reports that Trevelyan has been there 'in a very triumphant and anti-military state.' Quotes Seeley on opposition to a reform. Asks her opinion of Myers' last poem in Macmillan['s Magazine]. Thinks it 'very fine', and remarks that Myers' ability 'to write anything so like Pope shows great versatility of style.' Adds that he is glad that she liked Catherine Symonds.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Declares that he was very glad to get news of Mary [Minnie], as the latter does not write to him. States that he has not heard from William either. Claims to be very busy with correspondence. Refers to developments at Rugby, and remarks that 'things keep dragging on'. Reports that he has asked about the governess, but without success. Asks his mother if she has applied to Mrs [Frances?] Kitchener, who has 'a sort of calendar of the women who pass and take honours in the July examination: in case they want any post of an educational kind. Reports that his old friend Tawney is in England, but that he has not seen him yet because of his [Tawney's] wife's illness. The latter 'was a Miss Fox daughter of the Dr. at Clifton'. Refers to the 'matter of young Meyer', which he declares to be 'a horrible puzzle'. Presumes that his mother hears enough from Rugby to know that 'the crisis seems to have come.' Speculates on the likely outcome.

States that he has read very little in the recent past, 'except Plato and Greek History', and reports that he has been writing 'an erudite paper on the Sophists for [their] Philological Journal.' Reports that he has 'only managed to read Macmillan and Miss Thackeray's story in Cornhill and Middlemarch: and O. W. Holmes's new book [Poet at the Breakfast Table]' which he thinks is 'a falling off but still enjoyable'. Has heard that the new Darwin [Expression of the Emotions] 'is very entertaining'. Sends his love to all, and adds that '[Strange] Adventures of a Phaeton in Macmillan [by William Black] seems to [him] excellent'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that on the following Tuesday he goes to Germany, and states that he hopes that he shall not return until he can speak German fluently. Undertakes not to read any English, apart from her letters and the Times, and to speak it as little as possible. Asks her to tell Edward that he shall be in London from Friday until Tuesday morning, staying with J. J. Cowell in Hyde Park, and that he expects a visit from him. Explains that he wishes to see some friends who are going up for the Eton and Harrow match at Lords. Reports that he heard on Monday from their mother, who 'is with William at Beddgelert without Books', and states that he sent Whewell's Plato to her. Remarks that she seems to be enjoying herself. Regrets that he could not have gone down to visit his aunt Henrietta before he went abroad. Reports that he read through 'the famous Leiden [des jungen] Werthers [by Goethe]' the other day, which, he claims, he could not put down until he finished it. States that he has begun on Jean Paul, but finds him very hard. Undertakes to write from abroad. Sends his love to Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

States that since he first got her letter he has been thinking over the question of 'C.B.'. Suggests that she split the question into two; firstly asks whether there is any prospect offered of C's finding occupation as a land agent after he has gone through the course, and if it is likely that there is a better opening for him in this line thatn in that for which he has already been trained, and secondly asks what abilities are required for even moderate success in the line. Is very glad to hear about William, and mentions that he is thinking of giving him a teapot as a wedding present, unless he hears that he has got teapots from elsewhere.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Offers to send her a book called A Lost Love by Ashford Owen [Anne Charlotte Ogle], which reminds him of 'Romance of a Dull Life etc [by Anne Judith Penny], only it is written with less intellect and perhaps more passionateness'.

Reports that he hears excellent accounts of her, and hopes that they are all true. Assumes that she is still at Hastings, Mentions that she may possibly be seeing William in a few days. Reports that he saw the latter at Oxford, and that he has given up his work for the term, and is going away, probably to Rugby first 'and then perhaps to Hastings.' Asks her how she finds Hastings. Declares that he knows it well, and looks forward to seeing much more of it in years to come, if his ' poor friend Cowell's life is preserved'; does not expect that Cowell will leave Hastings again now.

Hopes that she is not experiencing any fogs. Declares that they have been having a splendid autumn [in Cambridge]. Reports that he is involved in a project for improving female education, by providing examination for governesses. States that there is an attempt being made to form a joint board, consisting of members of the two universities, for the purpose. Mentions that there are also other projects. Remarks that it appears that there is particular activity in the North of England, where schoolmistresses 'and other enlightened people have associated themselves in several great towns, and out of these associations a general council has been formed with lofty aspirations'.

Refers to Matthew Arnold, whose 'unfortunate lecture on culture has been attacked again in the Fortnightly Review by Frederic Harrison'. Advises her that 'the Guardian Angel by O.W. Holmes is worth reading, though he thinks 'not good as a novel'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

States that he has just received her note. Reports that they found William at Zermatt when they returned from an expedition the previous afternoon, and have been with him all day, 'walking up to and down from the Gower Goat' Reports that William seems to them 'in a very satisfactory condition'. Refers to [Edward or James?] Rhoades, who has been with the latter for a fortnight, and states that that both he and William consider it to have been 'a most successful expedition'. Reports that William had intended to stay in the region and tackle some of the high passes there, but a decree of the Federal Government prohibiting the employment of French guides has forced him to change his plans, and he has decided to accompany Henry out of Switzerland into Italy to do the '[Tour] of Monte Rosa', and then go back to Chamonix. Informs her that he gave William her address. Hopes that she will have a good time. Reports that they are at present 'depressed by corporal ailments of various kinds', but they are otherwise cheerful.

Letter from F. Y. Edgeworth to Henry Sidgwick

Writes in relation to the subject of taxation, and to their slight difference of opinion in the matter. Refers to the principles of William Sidgwick, to common expenditure, the burden of taxation, direct taxation and taxation on commodities.

Edgeworth, Francis Ysidro (1845–1926) economist

Letter from J.B. Payne to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he received Sidgwick's note that morning. Fears that he has been in 'a fool's paradise of laziness and self-indulgence for years past.' Discusses human interaction, and expresses his happiness he feels at the sight of Sidgwick's writing. Refers to his work, and repeats that he has been 'intensely lazy and self-pleasing for years past'. Of the rest of his life he says 'everything is very nice', and declares it 'a great piece of luck' to be within reach of Sidgwick's brother [William?] and sister. Reports that he dined with them on Wednesday and Friday, and that the last time [Henry Weston?] Eve was there also. Relates that '[t]he boys came Thursday', and that he stayed in town a day longer than he intended to 'in order to spend an evening with Temple at Palgrave's.' Claims to have been very impressed by the former. Refers to his '[ ] personal influence at Rugby', and observes that he has 'an antique simplicity and directness about him'. Reports that Eve 'has brought himself to a state in which he can be perfectly unconscious and yet apparently devout the whole time.' Recounts that on week days they are about forty-five minutes in Chapel, and on Sundays about two hours, and claims that on the day of writing he took the Communion, but 'came away with a stronger conviction than ever that this pale reflection of the bloody rites of antiquity is quite out of date, and has no longer any meaning at all for a generation which is rapidly learning science and forgetting the meaning of the word sin.' Discusses his colleagues, including Fisher, Carr, Griffith, Penny, Stanwell, Spurling and Collet. Of Eve he says that '[i]t is absolutely a byword against him that he reads Miles.' Informs Sidgwick that the Modern School has been remodelled, and that he [Payne] is second Master in it, having now severed the last link that bound him to Classics. Declares that Sidgwick's brother-in-law [Edward White Benson] 'is more a ritualist' than he had thought, and that 'his whole [Wesen] reminds [him] a good deal of Kingsbury, in spite of the obvious differences.' Declares that he never believes a doctrine is dead because it ought to be, and that he agrees with Mill about the English Dictionary. Asks Sidgwick to remember him 'to the assembled brethren', and remember him in private very affectionately to Jackson. Would like the latter to write him 'a gossipy letter'. Claims to be very curious to see Jebb's article, and asks Sidgwick for another letter soon.

Payne, John Burnell (1838-1869) clergyman and art critic

Letter from J.B. Payne to Henry Sidgwick

Had hoped to see Sidgwick in the holidays. Refers to William [Sidgwick?], who he thought was 'looking better, but weak + shaken still.' Reports that he hears of Cambridge politics from G. Young and others. Believes it to be 'almost too late to save the national importance of Oxford and Cambridge.' Refers Sidgwick to 'M[atthew] Arnold's preface, and Seeley's [New] Universities.' Of the Protestant clerics he says 'may not the nation say at last to [them] - Your money perish with you - as it is even now in a mood to let the Irish tithe pig go and gorge his endowments in a corner.' Claims to sympathise with Sidgwick's work, and offers his services if the latter should ever want anybody morally assassinated 'in the P.U.G.'. Claims that the latter periodical 'now butters [his] daily crust.' Reports that he writes on art, and on 'other things more or less sincere', and offers to 'work up' into an article anything that Sidgwick likes to send him. Refers to H[ ]'s disgust at Payne's usage of the word 'abstraction'. Urges Sidgwick to 'take a bed' in his house when he goes to see 'the Academy'.

Payne, John Burnell (1838-1869) clergyman and art critic

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Apologises for having neglected to write to him. Declares that her time at Wellington College has passed pleasantly, but has been devoid of incident. Refers to Minnie's happiness with Edward, and to her domestic activities. Remarks that Edward, although not ill now, needs rest. Looks forward to 'the happy Rugby Xmas', and declares that she is glad she kept on the house there. Is very glad that Henry will be at home all the vacation, and hopes that he will ask [A. J.] Patterson to come. Explains that during the latter half of the vacation Edward and Minnie and William will be gone, and suggests that he invites his friends then. States that she will ask William about his friends when she passes through Oxford the following Thursday, when she is to meet Lucy Brown and lunch with her in William's rooms.

Reports that Mr [Francis?] Martin has just been [at Wellington College], and told her that Henry is looking 'remarkably well'. Adds that she thinks that Henry should be doing lighter work. Tells him not to let Arthur work too hard. Reports that William was at Wellington College that previous Sunday, looking very well. Refers to 'the appointment [of H. M Butler as new headmaster] to Harrow', and remarks that '26 sounds very young', but that she hears that Butler 'is a very fit man.' Is glad to hear that Henry comes home on 15 [December]. Asks him to give the enclosed [not included] to Arthur.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she is at Saltford House near Bath to visit Julia[na] Kelly (née Boyd), formerly of Burfield Priory, who married after the Sidgwicks left Clifton. Announces that she is on her way to see Mr and Mrs C. Ward [perhaps the brother of Henry's aunt Mary Jane Sidgwick, and his wife] at Stapleton, and then is going on to Cheltenham to see Mr and Mrs Lace. Reports that she got both Henry's and Arthur's letters at Bedford, and that she found William at Oxford, suffering from a toothache. Adds that they discussed their winter gathering, and that William was agreeable to the proposal of staying at Sydenham. States that Henry's Aunt Croft's sister and her husband are about to take up their residence there. Asks for Henry's and Arthur's opinion. Mentions that Wellington College was proposed as a meeting place for all the family on Christmas Day, and states that she has written to Minnie to ask her about her plans.

Intends to go to Rugby to enquire about a house. Regrets that Henry could not see Minnie and her baby. Reports that Elizabeth 'still continues to take the place of nurse....' Thinks that Henry's uncle at Bedford [William Crofts] would be glad to see him, and suggests that Henry might give him 'some useful hints about his son William as to the books he ought to have....' Explains that the latter is in Mr Fanshawe's first class and has a good chance of an exhibition. Would like to hear about Henry's German experiences. Describes her time with her friend Julia as quiet, but adds that there is little to do. States that she meant to see Old King's Parade and 'and all the neighbours who still remain', and that she might get to see Miss Powell.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Admits that she could not resist opening Arthur's letter to Henry to see if there was one for her also, and, finding none, read it. Hopes that the '[Sen: Op.]' will come after all, and reports that the packet came the previous day. Reports that Edward left them that morning for L[ ], where he had to see a dentist, and hopes to reach Wellington College that evening. Refers to Mr Martin also. Reports that Minnie and the children hope to go home the following day if they hear from Mr Barford that the measles is no longer a threat. Announces that Elizabeth returns to her in about a month. Adds that William will tell Henry 'that Katie Lace is engaged to Mr Wawn!' Doubt that the Cononley curacy 'can possible keep 2 people.'

Reports that Henry's Aunt Henrietta came [to Rugby] the previous night, and will stay a few days before going on to Leeds. Urges Henry to come to visit her at Easter. Reports that Mr Conington sent her Deerbrook, [by Harriet Martineau] which she intends to read at the first opportunity.

Additional note: Sends 'the enclosed [her letter to Henry, above, and letter from Arthur to Henry - not included] with most frantic apologies.' Reports that she did two problems that morning , which has made her feel better.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks him for his last letter, and explains that she could not answer before leaving Rugby for Wellington College. Reports that Arthur went to Cambridge for the Fellowship Examination, the result of which is probably not to be known until the following Friday. States that his chances of success are increased by Mr [Joseph?] Romilly's death. Adds that Mr [J. L.?] Hammond came to Rugby to take his work for the week. Reports that William spent a few days with his Aunt, and then came to Wellington College. Thinks that he is better.

Reports that the family at the College are well, and that Edward is looking 'quite portly', and Minnie 'stout and strong', and the children, Martin, Arthur and the baby [Nellie], healthy also, having benefitted from their time at the sea at Swanage. Announces that she is to stay there longer than she had intended, and that if he decides to go home to Rugby he will find a bed, but will not see her. Suggests that if there was space at Wellington College he could come there.

Expresses her delight at his promise of the stamps of the German states, and states that her little friend will be very pleased. Refers also to the stamped envelopes which Henry wants for Miss [Meta?] Benfey.

14 Oct: Refers to Henry's letter from Lille. Reports that Arthur got his fellowship, as have [Henry] Jackson and [William Knyvet] Wilson, and that she is delighted for Arthur. States that William returns to Oxford that day, and that at Merton there is a fourth tutor, 'which will make the work less hard for him.' Reports that at Rugby they are still in the old house, and may have to wait until the following summer to get Mrs Leicester's house. Refers to the letter that Dr Temple sent to the Masters, and reports that it caused great discussion in Rugby. Discusses the matter, adding that letters 'are often appearing in the Rugby Advertizer recommending a speedy and thorough ventilation of the whole subject.' Explains that doctors and lawyers don't like the mixture of their class with the trades people, and so could not avail themselves of the proposed middle school, and that 'they want to retain the privilege of Foundation, and send their children to the other school free of charge.' Thinks that she may benefit from the fact that houses are not letting so well, and get a cheaper house.

Is grateful for the stamps, and is trying to get those which his friends want. Asks whether she should send the stamps to Fraulein Benfey or to him. Hopes that he will take Professor Ewald's advice and go on with studying Hebrew. Thinks of trying German herself. Hopes that he will come home as soon as he can at the end of term, for otherwise he will not see Arthur. Reports that Edward and Minnie are both plump and well, and that the former is in the midst of his scholarship examinations. Refers also to the children, who 'grow apace'. Reports on the progress of the Master's house in Rugby.

Reports that his Aunt [Lace] has been to Scarborough and is now near York, and that she seems 'so weak in bodily health'. Hopes for a recovery, however, for the sake of her husband and children. Intends to be at Wellington College for about another fortnight, and then will go back to Rugby or to Brighton. Claims to be better than she was, and able to do more and walk more. Asks him to let him know as soon as he gets to Cambridge. Announces that Mr Martin arrives the following day and will stay for a fortnight. Reports that Alfred Sidgwick is now at the Schoolhouse and likes it very much, and that all the 'Elders' of the Sidgwick family were well when she last heard.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that she has written to [Sampson?] Mordan, asking him to send Henry two or three gold pens to try, and tells him to send back the rest when he has chosen one; Arthur has at last got one that suits him. Reports on her re-arrangement of books, and states that Arthur has 'the wee room over the kitchen as a small sanctum....' Reports that Arthur was very happy with the result of the Dresden expedition that he went on with [F.E.] Kitchener. Refers to the imminent weddings of two of their young masters [at Rugby School]: the marriage of Mr Potts and Miss B[owden] Smith, and Mr Bond and Miss Cram, the sister of Mrs Elsee.

Reports that Ada [Benson] is staying at Rugby, and claims that she is glad to have her and to know her better. Thinks that 'there is much good in her and a great deal of thought', but still believes 'that girls develop better under home influences until past 20....' Refers to Mr and Mrs [Jex-?] Blake and their feelings about Professor and Mrs Benfey and Göttingen.

Refers to Henry's last letter, and discusses the dangers of mental inactivity. Is glad that Henry is to see William, who will tell him about a plan for her to see Switzerland that year. Thinks that Arthur knows of Emilia in England [novel by Meredith, later renamed Sandra Belloni], but undertakes to tell him of it anyway. Asks whether he takes Macmillan's Magazine as he used to, and asks him to send them to her. Offers to send him some orange marmalade. Reports that all is well at Wellington College, and states that she shall be there about the end of May.

Announces that one of Henry's Stone Gappe cousins - Algernon - is preparing to emigrate to British Caffraria [the Cape Colony/South Africa] in a few weeks. Reports that Henry's Aunt is now in a private place 'called the "Retreat" near York, and that his Uncle and Aunt Crofts from Leeds are that week at Brighton.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to feel ashamed at not having written to him for so long. Reports that she has had a succession of friends, including Miss Attersoll, Mrs Plunkett, Henry's Aunt Henrietta, and Uncle William from Bedford, in Rugby for short visits, and these occupied a good deal of her time. Mrs Plunkett stayed on her way to Switzerland; her son Willoughby has got his commission and is gone to India with a regiment of the Royal Artillery. Announces that she expects Eleanor soon, and Henry's Aunt Ellen from Leeds on Saturday, and that the latter and his Aunt Henrietta go to Brighton on the following Tuesday.

Reports that Arthur is much busier than before, and so she sees less of him. Claims that she is now trying to 'get into regular ways of occupying' herself, and reports that she has her pupil for English twice a week, to whom she reads French. Remarks that all of her lady visitors 'rather shrink from discussing any of the many subjects which are interesting to intellectual people' and 'are content to express their fears as to where this "idolatry of intellect" will end.' Reports that she has heard from William, whose work, he claims, does not weigh on him. Remarks that Arthur 'looks quite strong'. States that no new master is yet appointed and Mr Phillips' brother is again at Rugby to help.

Assumes that Henry will be glad to hear of Mr H. Lee Warner's fellowship. Asks him to thank his Aunt Ellen for her letter, and to tell her how his mother should enjoy seeing all her 'north-country friends' again, but fears that it will not come to pass that year. Asks him also to send his love to his Aunt Henrietta, and thank her for her letter. Regrets that [William] Crofts cannot come back to the Schoolhouse for the quarter as the houses are very full. Tells him to tell Ellen also that she has 'a great dal to say to her about Welsh scenery', and that Ernest must go and sketch there some day.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to William Sidgwick

Reports that Mrs A.H. Clough called on her that afternoon, and mentioned a proposed scheme for the furtherance of female education, which her sister-in-law, Miss Clough, is very anxious to carry out. She suggested that several schools in a large town could unite and be lectured to by a 'well-educated man from one of the Universities' on a given subject. She asked Mary Sidgwick to mention this scheme to William, having been told by Arthur that there was no such man available at Rugby. Announces that Miss Clough is to go down to Liverpool soon to make enquiries about the schools there.

Reports that Mrs Clough is staying at the Schoolhouse in Rugby, and that she enquired about William, and was anxious to know how Miss Brooks was received at Stone Gappe. Mary Sidgwick passed on news of her, which she had learnt from William Lace. Is glad to hear that William is 'better in spirits', and that his work is not too much for him. Reports that Mrs Acland informed her that Lady Brodie was sending her eldest daughter to the Miss Louis' school near London, to which Miss Cannan sent her 'little charge' Mary [ ]. Adds that one of the Moult[ ]'s 'musical cousins - a Miss Salt' has been giving lessons there....' Reports that Ernest Crofts has been staying at Rugby for a few days, and remarks that he seems really in earnest about his occupation. Reports that Arthur is very well, and that Mrs Symonds has been at Rugby for a few days. [Incomplete].

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

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