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Moore, Thomas Sturge (1870-1944) writer and wood engraver
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Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Merton College, Oxford. – Is sorry that Trevelyan will not be able to visit before he goes abroad, but hopes he may be able to come to Oxford next term. The move to the new house went well but there is still much to do; nowhere for him to work there yet. Is looking forward to the appearance of the “Lucretius”. Good news about the “Collected Works”, but Trevelyan should make sure that they are not too expensive: TSM [Thomas Sturge Moore?] made a mistake in that respect. Originally enclosing an exam paper set by Abercrombie, drawing attention to one of the questions.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Monk's Walk Cottage, Much Marcle, Dymock, Gloucester. - Has left town and "settled on a precarious income in the country": draws attention to his new address and hopes Trevelyan and his wife will visit. Returns Sturge Moore's play ["Mariamne?"]; asks if he can have Trevelyan's "Lucifer" copied before he returns it. Sends his "Mary and the Bramble", which [Henry William?] Massingham has just rejected; asks if Trevelyan can return it soon as he is going to try "The English Review". If no magazine will accept the poem, he will publish it himself; asks if Trevelyan will take a copy for one shilling. Will be in London soon and hopes he may find Trevelyan at his "Whiggery" [the National Liberal Club].

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock, Gloucester. - Arrangements for meeting in London for the Italian trip. Hopes Trevelyan can get hold of Moore. Will see Forster next day and ask him if he will start with them; he has done some excellent designs for [Moore's] "Judith". Will bring a translation of [St. Francis's?] "Fioretti", an Italian dictionary and grammar.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock. - Sends "The Book" ["Emblems of Love"]; his appreciation for Trevelyan's criticism. Is working on his dialogue book ["Speculative Dialogues"] and then will begin his book on Hardy; has also undertaken to give a lecture in Manchester and has many reviews to write. Thanks for the things Forster says Trevelyan has given them for the garden. Has Moore's book ["A Sicilian Idyll and Judith: A Conflict"].

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The View, Upper Wyche, Malvern [address added in pencil on headed notepaper for "The Gallows"]. - October would suit very well for a visit from Trevelyan. "Deborah" may well be put on in London as well as Manchester. Is sorry to hear about Makower [Stanley Makower's serious illness]. A friend, Dorothy Riley, has gone to work for Mrs Vaughan Morgan at Puttenham Priory in Surrey, and it would be kind if Trevelyan could manage to see something of her. Has not got Moore's "Mariamne", but will buy it if he doesn't get it to review.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock, Gloucester. - Thanks for the sale of "The Sale [of St. Thomas]". Should like to see Moore's letter as he must talk with him about private publishing: does not think he could publish them himself but would give Moore any help he could. "Thomas" not selling well. Glad that Trevelyan has come to an agreement with Tovey [about "The Bridge of Dionysus"] but wishes it was more satisfactory. He and his wife have not made a decision about Italy.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock, Gloucester. - Returns Moore's letter: is glad he has "come round so handsomely" regarding "The Sale[of St. Thomas]. Has not heard yet from Bridges. Thinks of writing on the railway strike, but is not sure yet sure on which side. Effects of the drought and strike workers' hunger evident in local cottages.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock, Gloucester. - Very sorry to hear of Trevelyan's "trouble and disappointment" [a miscarriage]; is glad that "Mrs Bob" is making a good recovery. Is alone since his wife and son are in Sheffield for medical treatment. Has written little poetry since his return from Italy, being occupied with his "Speculative Dialogues" (now postponed) and critical work on Thomas Hardy: "A real big fellow, I think he is now". Has also taken on play-reading for the Liverpool Theatre. Is glad to hear of Trevelyan's work on the "Agamemnon" [of Aeschylus]; he feels that "an actable version" of the whole "Oresteia" is needed, and should Trevelyan do one he'll try his best to get it acted in Liverpool. The theatre is very badly off, but he is trying to get good plays there: will ask Dickinson if he may suggest his "Lassalle" and also attempt to get Bottomley put on. Is interested to hear of Trevelyan's "Hun poet" [Ferenc Békássy?]; it is the Servians [sic] who most intrigue him at the moment. Asks if Trevelyan knows of any translations of the Servian Kosovo cycle. He and Moore have had a very amusing correspondence.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Cottage, Silverdale, Carnforth - Expresses his and his wife's delight at being the dedicatees of Trevelyan's new collection ["The Death of Man"]. Hopes Julian's health improves when his tonsils are out. Is glad the "Moore business" [the obtaining of an allowance from the Civil List for him?] has gone well so far; was sorry not to have heard from Hewlett. Is anxious about the police and "hope[s] they mean business this time": feels that their success or failure will determine the nature of "the revolution". "[T]hat little swine Winston" ought to be "done in".

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Sends [circulation?] list, and hopes it will be of more use to Trevelyan than to Moore, at whose lack of success he is perplexed. Trevelyan says Moore has had no reviews [for "Mariamne"?], but he himself wrote one for the "Nation" a while ago and will be annoyed if it has not been printed. Delighted to hear of Trevelyan's new book "Ariadne" ["The Bride of Dionysus: a music-drama, and Other Poems."] which he discusses briefly.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Postmarked Dymock; addressed to Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Arrangements for meeting in London and their journey to Italy. Forster is definitely not coming with them. Has accepted Moore's invitation to dine; asks Trevelyan to get him to read to them. Abercrombie's brother [Patrick?] strongly recommends a stay in Milan for its Romanesque churches. Expects Catherine would like to talk with the Ken Lawsons.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes the 'invalid' [Thomas Sturge Moore?] is better and can return home soon, though sure he is comfortable at the Mill House; Mrs Moore seemed 'such a nice creature, with her pretty French manners & sweet face'; sure Elizabeth likes helping her. Keen to hear whether Elizabeth got to Tunbridge [for the Conference, see 11/107]; admire her for having canvassed. She herself has had 'urgent telegrams' about a women's meeting in Horsham today; would be wonderful if Erskine won. Sir George is very pleased at [Theodore] Roosevelt's victory. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter have been staying for a couple of nights. Mary's cousin Blanche Stanley has been staying with her, who has a 'lovely soprano voice' and has been well taught. Mary has also got Charles to sing better; they are away now. Sends love to Robert, asks if he would like his "1001 Gems [of Poetry]" to be sent. Looking forward to the play. Asks if Elizabeth would like to have a box of chrysanthemums sent next week, and whether Mrs [Helen] Fry would like some, or Mrs Moore when they get back.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad the invalid [Thomas Sturge Moore] has recovered, and that Mrs Moore is such a good friend; hopes he is not 'delicate'. Sir George has sent a hare and duck which he shot himself. Caroline sends part of a letter from Miss Jones and some newspaper reports; asks Elizabeth to destroy Miss Jones's note and return the reports to her at 37 Broadwater Down, Tunbridge Wells. Glad Elizabeth enjoyed the Conference [of the Women's Liberal Associations?]; Mrs [Eva?] McClaren is 'bold' and 'uncompromising', but also 'warmhearted... cultivated' and charming. Knows Mrs [Frances] H[eron] Maxwell from the Westminster Women's Liberal Association; her 'appearance is really terrible' but she is a 'very good woman', most energetic, and 'sympathetic with working women'. Mary wrote a paper on land value and read it at the [Women's Liberal Associations] Conference at Sunderland; Caroline is very pleased they are both interested in the work she likes so much. Sure Maria [Springett] will enjoy making Elizabeth comfortable; Aunt Annie will be at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] on Friday afternoon. Sir George has been asking how the [building of the new] house is going; perhaps Robert can write about it. Asks when they are going abroad, and whether Elizabeth has found anyone to go with her. Will send flowers on Monday. Hopes Robert's proofs are going well[ for "The Birth of Parsival?]. George's book ["England Under the Stuarts]" is just coming out.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Has returned home; enjoyed her visit to the Shiffolds; was good to see Elizabeth and Robert 'comfortably settled'; the house is 'quite charming' and it will be quite perfect if they can get the landlord to cut down some trees to increase the view. She travelled up on Thursday with their 'talkative neighbour, Mr Arbuthnot'. Had a busy afternoon with Aunt Annie [Philips], then a 'pleasant time at Cheyne Gardens' [George and Janet's house] before travelling north yesterday. Has been up to see Mary and the baby who are 'both flourishing', and has 'sent them for a drive'. Sir George was very interested to hear about the house. Asks if Robert has written to Mr St. M. [Sturge Moore?]; it is 'best to be open about such things, as they only rankle if not spoken of'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Very glad to welcome Elizabeth and Julian yesterday, who both seemed well and happy; Julian seems to have come on very well since they last say him, 'easily to lend himself to be amused, and well able to amuse himself'; he was full of a play which [Thomas Sturge] Moore had written for the household to act, and 'declaimed the Prologue with great vigour'. The weather has been vile, and the Avon is so flooded that it makes him think 'with pathetic apprehension, to the Seine': the Parisians have suffered enough. Is doing a lot of reading: has just finished Theocritus, and finds him 'as delightful, but somewhat more still than of old'; discusses editions of the text; likes the Epigrams more than Macaulay did, and the one on Archilochus made him think of Robert.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. -Winter has returned and the world is white again, but there has been a thaw today and he hopes it extends to Paris. Very interested in Robert's account of the 'local arrangements' of his organisation [the Friends War Victims Relief Committee]. Aunt Anna [Philips] much appreciated her visit to Shiffolds, and was glad to see the [Thomas Sturge] Moores. Julian seems to be doing his best to be a good schoolboy; very good that Robert and Elizabeth know so much about the school. Very good to have George back again, though he and Janet have 'great the worry and anxiety' of Humphry having scarlet fever; he is getting excellent care in an isolation hospital at Berkhamsted. Sir George is leading a quiet life and a happy, except for 'public, and above all general financial, and trade, anxieties'; is reading a good amount of the classics every day, and next month plans to read Lucretius in his uncle [Macaulay's] copy, which is 'very copiously annotated, and marked'. Has been reading so much about the Epicureans in [Cicero's] "De Natura Deorum" and "De Officiis" that his curiosity has been revived; like a man who has been reading [Pascal's] "Provincial Letters" and wants to know 'what the Jesuits have to say for themselves'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

22 Sussex Villas, W. - Has written to Mrs Grammont [sic: Bramine Hubrecht] 'about her young Russian'. Tells Bessie to make sure Bob writes the article on [Thomas Sturge] Moore as soon as he gets home. Will be away from the middle of March to the middle of May, so Bob must communicate directly with [Edward] Jenks about the article, unless [Nathaniel] Wedd or [Goldie Lowes] Dickinson return from their Easter holiday in time to take it. Glad they have got 'such a jolly place'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Bob's idea is 'exhilarating in the extreme'; says he will 'tame a wild rabbit... paint every hair on a stag'. Bob's letter is the best kind of 'patron's letter' as it 'gives the mood of the picture perfectly. It seems already painted'. Helen was as delighted with the letter and the idea as he was. Gives his thoughts on the painting; the figures 'must not be jesuitical' - Bob is right that that is a habit of his, partly as he intends figures 'to be furniture of a landscape and not serious people'. Will come over tomorrow to see [Thomas Sturge?] Moore, or Bob could bring him to the Frys' house, or they could come on Sunday morning. Mrs Crompton will be here tomorrow, and he would like Bob and Moore to see her; invites them to tea.

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Les Andelys, Eure [postmark]; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Nr. Dorking. - Thanks Bob for the letter and the cuttings; [Thomas Sturge?] Moore is obviously an 'accomplished journalist' and 'got round to Mackmurdo's corner admirably'; does not enjoy Moore's criticism of his own work, but is 'awfully glad he likes Helen's so much'. They have had one 'divinely beautiful day' and cycled for about thirty miles along the Seine; Helen is already much better for the change. Lists their further travel plans. Thinks 'the Claude ought to have a dark background'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

90 High Street, Oxford. - Thanks Bob and Bessie for their letters. In twenty-four hours, he and Janet will be married; there is 'too much to say to begin saying it'. Will return to Cheyne Gardens by the middle of May; expects they will see each other soon after that. Tells Bob in a postscript to send his article on [Thomas Sturge] Moore to E. Jenks when he has finished if none of Goldie [Dickinson], [Robin] Mayor or [Nathaniel] Wedd are in England.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Dated 'Sunday'. Apologises for not sending the books earlier; was very busy with the lectures and with arranging for his parents visiting to see Helen [Coombe]; Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] and 'a sister' have also been staying. Has filled the box up with clothes which Mrs Smith [their landlady] thought Bob 'ought to want'. Says 'I told you so' about Bob being in Italy: it is better than 'going Jonkopping in Sweden [visiting Jönköping?]' and he might get some work done; suggests going to Fiesole or Prato, though that might be too hot. Asks if Bob intends to stay till winter; if so they will arrange to meet. Everything now settled: he and Helen hope to marry early in November and come out to Italy. Has had 'rather an awful time with his parents': very sorry for his father and his disappointment in him and so 'made a huge effort to get through the misunderstanding' but only gave him and his mother pain. This has made him 'awfully depressed'; found it hard to 'pull himself together for the lectures' but thinks they were the best he has done; pleased that both Goldie and [Thomas Sturge?] Moore liked them. Has been bicycling with Goldie, who is 'getting more reconciled about Helen'; thinks he 'begins to see that it can't make any real difference between [them]'. They went to Woodbridge and tried but failed to find [Edward] Fitzgerald's grave, then to Dedham 'which is the only [piece of French country in England and explains Constable'. Helen's harpsichord [which she is decorating for Arnold Dolmetsch] is 'going to be a great success'; she is 'quite decided' that Bob must either come back for the wedding or meet them in Italy.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Has had dreadful weather and not been able to work until a couple of days ago, as he was kept inside; began yesterday and is now getting on well. Will return at the end of January as his mother suggests, and thinks it would be convenient for Bessie to visit England early in February; would not stay in Holland long on the way back if so as he wants to keep writing. Will come to Welcombe as he thinks it would be best for her to visit to be there rather than London; the Frys have invited her to stay with them in Dorking for a few days, which would enable her to see [Robert's house at] Westcott. Asks his mother to send George's address again, as he wants to write to him. Old Palumbo has been very ill, and it was thought he would die; he is better now but if he were to worsen again Robert would move pension, though his address could remain the same. Has had nice letters [about his engagement] from almost all his friends. Wrote to [William] Morton Philips. [Frank] Previté has published a book of short stories, "My Great Discovery" with Smithers & Co., under the pseudonym 'Henry Frances' as he does not want his family to know. Gives the book his qualified praise, and suggests his mother try it. Is pleased with what he has written of his own play; thinks it is 'better conceived and better carried out than the last', but knows these feelings can be deceptive. Has read Stephen Philips' play "Paolo and Francesca" which is so popular at the moment: thinks there is 'some decent poetry of a not very high order, and a good deal of theatrical cleverness', but that it is a 'bad play, and pretentious too'. Must not make his mother think he is jealous; hopes it will succeed on the stage, as this will make things easier for [Thomas Sturge] Moore, Binyon, and himself. Bessie says she is sending some photos to his mother, and seems well. Asks if his mother remembers a Countess Bylandt, who says she used to know her and his father: Bessie met her the other day at the Hague.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven, with extract from poem based on the "Mahabharata" by Trevelyan

Begins mid-sentence stating that [his brother George's book "The Age of Wycliffe"] is 'a good piece of history', which shows up John of Gaunt as 'a sort of 14th century Taman[n]y ring boss'. Also recommends Rostand's "Les Romanesques", which he read recently and things is even better than "Cyrano". Cannot think of any more modern books for the moment; fears his list is 'chiefly composed of friends' and relations' books'; [Roger] Fry is also bringing out his book on Bellini soon, which is well worth getting. Asks Elizabeth to tell Mrs Grandmont that the Frys would like her to visit when she is in England; gives their address. He himself is getting a house near Dorking at Westcott, and will move in September, when he will be within a mile of the Frys; the house he is giving up at Haslemere is, though, very beautiful. Supposes she has been back from Taormina a while; asks her to send some photographs, especially the ones of 'Mrs. Cacc. [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan] and the dogs' and himself in the loggia. The last few days of scirocco were 'a great bore', but he almost forgives it for preventing the trip up Monte Xerito as it 'made [them] those splendid waves among the rocks'; it also 'put [Elizabeth's] fiddle out of sorts' though, so he could not hear any more Bach suites. Heard Isaye [sic: Ysaÿe] play one yesterday, as well as the Mendelsohn concerto; he was in good form, and he will hear him again playing the Beethoven. Is having a musical week, as he has already seen Paderewski, for the first time, and will hear [Wagner's] "Tristram" tomorrow. 'Paddy was great fun, at all events to look at'; thinks he played a Chopin concerto better than the Beethoven. Spends most of his time at the British Museum library when he is in London; has found a translation of [Joost van den] Vondel there by a Dutch American; it is 'very conscientious and scholarly' but he does not think much of the blank verse; still, he can now go on where Elizabeth left off. Would like to know when Mrs G[randmont] is coming to England, and if Elizabeth is likely to be in London so he can 'make a display of [his] extensive and profound knowledge of Italian painting in the National Gallery'. Not sure whether he is going to Bayreuth yet; discusses times he could come to Holland.

Suggests older books she should read: Keats's letters, most of which are available in Sidney Colvin's edition though he advises getting Buxton Forman's four volume edition with the poetry; Butcher and Lang's translation of the "Odyssey"; Meinhold's "Sidonia the Sorceress" and "Amber Witch", translated by Lady Wilde and Lady Duff Gordon. Could lend her all of these books, as well as [Henry James's] "In a Cage" and his brother and father's books . Asks her to write with news and to say when would be best for him to come to Holland; he will write soon to the Grandmonts when he sends them [Thomas Sturge?] Moore's book. Thinks he remembers Elizabeth said she had never read Jane Austen; she should read them all, especially "Mansfield Park", "Pride and Prejudice" and "Emma". Breaks off mid -sentence: 'by advising to...': 9/71 forms the rest of the letter.

A portion of what seems to be a poem by Robert Trevelyan based on the "Mahabharata", with some explanatory notes, is found with this letter but not referred to in it

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Seatoller. - Expects Bob is enjoying himself abroad. Is having a good time at Seatoller with [Maurice?] Amos, [Ralph] Wedgwood and [George] Moore; Vaughan Williams left a few days ago; he and Wedgwood 'bathe in Cambridge pool every morning'; Amos and Wedgwood work hard for their triposes, while Moore chiefly reads "Jane Eyre" and other novels, and George 'all sorts of jolly books', none for his tripos. They are all getting on well, even better than at Stye since there is not the 'slight distance between Moore and Wedgwood'. They go up the mountains in the afternoon; he and Moore, as 'the Wordsworthians of the party' went over to Grasmere and Rydal; describes Dove Cottage, de Quincey's extension to it, and S.T.C. [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]'s house. Declares that there were 'men in England then', also naming Scott, Shelley, Byron and Keats. George got his scholarship; does not seem fair that Wedgwood has not, while they give one to someone like Charlie Buxton 'of very ordinary ability' in their first year; thinks this is 'bolstering up classics'. It is however a sign that the college is doing 'their duty to history' that there is now an entrance scholarship for it. Is glad at a personal level that Buxton has a scholarship: he and George will have plenty of money to go abroad in the long vacation now. Elliott has not got a scholarship, but is spoken of as 'certain' next year. Had a nice letter from Bowen; German measles is active in [Grove] house. Asks Bob to write to him about the novel if he needs someone to discuss it with: he knows the plan and beginning, and will keep it secret. Wedgwood is a really good rock climber. Notes in postscript that he will be seeing Moore's brother [Thomas] in London again next week, so Bob should write there.

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