Showing 21 results

Archival description
Sidgwick, Sarah Isabella (1832-1918) wife of William Carr Sidgwick
Print preview View:

Letter from Nora Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Since returning to England from Paris she has been very busy with various activities, which delayed her writing to Mary. It is very pleasant being settled in their own house in Cambridge, even though it is only a temporary one. Asks Mary when she intends to come to stay with her and Henry. They have got a cook, who is coming to them on 9 May for a month's trial period. Hopes that William and Isabel have arrived and are well, and sends her and Henry's love to them. Wishes that they could both come to see them, but is glad that William can see Mary. Adds that the cruet stand they want is a stand for oil and vinegar and sauces, and on the strength of what Mary said, Nora chose one in London that cost £7 or £8. Asks if they may wait about 'the other things' like china and glass, until they move into their new house, as they have the use of the Fawcett's things in the house where they are at present living. Sends a photograph of herself [not included], and explains that Henry's have not yet come. They only came to Cambridge from London the previous morning, but visited for a day the previous week as Henry had an examiners' meeting. Thinks the decoration of the house in which they are now living would amuse Mary; describes the drawing room, which they do not much like.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at the receipt of his book the previously night. Claims that she will not understand its subject, but that if she could send it forth to the world 'with a mother's loving dedication, it would be that all the philosophical world would be the better for reading it.' Hopes that 'they' have written to him from Rugby to tell him that they are meeting on 4 January, and informs him that 'A[rthur] S[idgwick] and Charlotte have their visit at N[ ] and the Chancery first, and don't get home again until Sat: 2[nd] Jan[uary].' States that William's work was to end the previous day, but that he has had a bad cold, and Isabel and his [son] have also been ill. Invites him to go to Oxford, and suggests that they all go to Rugby together. Mentions Henry's friends, and declares that she doesn't know what the Greens' plans are. Reports that she has seen a good deal of them, and that 'they are most kind.' Reports that Mrs Symonds was with them a short time ago, and 'just as [she] was going to have a nice [ ] [ ] with her, a telegram came to say that one of her children was in scarlet fever and she must go home.' Adds that it turned out that the fever 'was of a mild kind'. Presumes that he is 'still engaged with work for the Ladies', and insists that he take a holiday. Reports that Arthur Benson has had a rheumatic attack 'just as he was going in for the Term's Examination at Eton - and so missed it - which grieves him.' States that he was expected at home on Thursday or Friday, and that Martin comes home from Winchester the following Wednesday. Adds that Minnie and Edward are both well, but that the family could not join the 'Rugby party'.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie kept her well-informed about Henry when at Lincoln, and that his own letter told her more. Refers to his activities with regard to his lectures and book. Asks him to go to Rugby around Christmas, 'when A[rthur] S[idgwick] wishes to assemble [them] for his house warming.' Adds that Minnie and Edward cannot go because their boys will just have arrived home from school. Expresses a strong wish that he should come to Oxford. Adds that Mr Green has been asking her when Henry is coming. Reports that William and Isabel are recovering from colds. Asks if he had told her that Captain and Mrs Go[ ] lived at Cambridge, and asks him to send her the address of Mrs Go[ ]'s sister Be[ ]. Informs him that his godson Willy [Longsden] 'has been doing better lately + is promoted to a "Top hat" ' at Merchant Taylors' school.

Reports that the Committee of the Association for the Education of Women at Manchester have asked Miss Cannan to be Secretary 'for that [work] where she lives - [ ] Prestwick.' Suggests that Miss Clough might like to be informed of this. Claims that she is 'still in rather a mess with carpenter + masons + painters to follow.' Adds that she has two comfortable beds to offer to friends, and tells him to bear it in mind if he wishes to go to Oxford. States that William and Isabel would be pleased to see him [and Nora] and that Mr Green and his wife always have a welcome for him. Reports tha the Symondses have come home from Switzerland. Reports that Edward Sidgwick wrote to her to tell her another daughter of his was born some weeks previously. States that he was much interested in what Henry had to say about spriritualism, and that their friends the Cooksons told them that Henry was at the Lakes and talking on the subject.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks Myers for his letter regarding 'very satisfactory arrangements'. Reports that the musical box has been forwarded. Announces that they will arrive on 2 January at C[ ]. Regrets that they 'cannot interpolate Chelt. between Cam. and Clifton' because they expect his brother William and his wife rather late, and therefore must stay in Cambridge rather late.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at receiving word from Henry, and at knowing that he is not ill. Explains that she came to Budleigh Salterton to be with Miss Temple 'who has been poorly for many weeks'. The latter was disappointed that she could not go to Rugby for the Speech Day with her brother and nieces. Reports that William wrote to say that he was glad she was coming and thought 'that it was imprudent not to compress the business of moving into as short a space of time as possible'. States that she reached Exeter on 27 June with Katie and Agnes Temple, and came to Budleigh Salterton having spent two nights at the Palace, to which she returns on Saturday. Hopes to be at Rugby again the following week. Describes the scenery and the beneficial effects of the sea air.

Reports that she left Arthur and Charlotte well, and that Mr Whitel[ ]d 'is so poorly in a sort of low fever, as to be quite unequal to his work'. Adds that Mr J. Wilson's brother Charles 'is come to do what he can to help'. Reports that Mr Phillpotts has been away 'owing to the illnes of his eldest boy who is away from Rugby', suffering from some kind of fever also. States that Miss Temple read her 'part of a letter to the Bishop [her brother Frederick] from a clergyman of the name of Hawkins', who asked the Bishop's opinion on the subject of spiritualism, and promising to send him some 'Photographs of "Incarnate Spirits"' Adds that she has not seen the Bishop since, but hopes to ask him about the matter when she returns to Exeter. States that she talked to Mr George Woodhouse on the subject, and expresses her own interest in it.

Reports that Isabel's brother Reginald Thompson 'is lately married to a Miss de Morgan a daughter of the Mrs de Morgan who is a great spiritualist. Refers to Professor Clifton, who told Isabel and her 'some wonderful stories told him by the elder [Mr] de Morgan now dead.'

Relates that Minnie has been suffering from toothache, and that Edward is in full residence, and that they will not move away from Lincoln until the end of September or beginning of October. Adds that their boys, Martin and Arthur, are going for scholarship at Winchester and Eton respectively, about 21 July. Remarks that she thinks that 'C[harlotte] S[ophia] S[idgwick] is a great favourite with all who know her', and doesn't believe that Arthur 'will find any great defects of which he was not aware - such as want of higher culture etc.' Adds that she has 'a sweet gentle temper', which is 'very winning.' Is anxious to hear from Henry, and is glad that he wrote to Mrs [ ]well, from whom she has not heard since.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

States that he has been very busy. Reports that his lectures have now come to an end. Explains that Charles [Sidgwick, his cousin?] had informed him of his uncle [John Benson Sidgwick]'s death before she had written to tell him, and says that he was 'much startled and grieved'. Refers to the last time that he saw him at the Mill; remembers all his 'childish feelings about him as the Head of the family' and is saddened by the thought that he 'shall never see his fine impressive old face again.' Mentions that one or two people in Cambridge had talked about him and the Ryddlesden family that term. Observes that Charles seems to be very popular.

Remarks that when this letter reaches his mother he shall be thirty-five, and goes on to discuss the ageing process, and the years which 'are beginning to go with Railroad Speed'. Intends to ask her to give him some of Miss Thackeray's works for his birthday. Hopes that she has 'good accounts of Isabel and the baby [Nevil]'. Reports that William was thinking of 'running over' to Cambridge, 'but somehow did not.' Announces that he is going to London to conduct an examination on 16 June, then to Margate for a fortnight, and after that he is uncertain about his plans.

Letter from Mary L. Cannan to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks Nora for having sent a copy of 'the Memoir of one whom I regarded with so much esteem and affection [Henry Sidgwick: a Memoir]. Is at present 'deep in Morley's Life of Gladstone ', and also has Mathilde Serao's Il Paese di Gesù [to read]. Reports that her health is still good, but is aware of a deterioration in her mental and physical strength over the previous six months. Reports that her nephew, Charles Cannan, with his wife and family, have taken lodgings in the vilage for three weeks around Easter, which pleases her greatly. Relates that their hills [in Westmorland] are still covered in snow, but that the valleys are green and the roads are again passable for pedestrians. Asks Nora to burn any old letters of hers that she finds. Adds that she is glad to hear 'tolerable accounts of [the] William Sidgwicks and of Arthur.' Tells her not to be overworking herself.

Cannan, Mary Louisa (1819-1911) schoolteacher

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Refers to her last letter, which he was glad to get. Reports that he is living 'uneventfully and somewhat lazily' in Cambridge, trying to write something for a book that he is working on. Hopes to go to Rugby about 22 September. Is glad to hear that Isabel 'is getting on; thinks 'Nevil' a very good name for the new baby [Isabel and William Sidgwick's son]. Asks her to tell him something about 'Arthur's young lady [Charlotte Sophia Wilson]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Broadstairs]:- Reports that he is settled in the same house with Isabel; he arrived the previous Friday, and has secured rooms there until Saturday 3 July. Intends to go to London early on 5 July, and they are going to being a new series of experiments on 6 July. Will be in London until 20 July, and is considering paying one or two visits until about the middle of August, when he plans to settle down in Cambridge. Reports that [Broadstairs] 'seems very salubrious', and that Nevil [his nephew] appears to be in excellent health and spirits. Declares that Isabel is very kind and does her best to make him comfortable. Reports that his book has sold as well as [Alexander?] Macmillan had expected, and a second edition is being discussed. Reports that two-hundred and fifty copies have gone to the United States, and he sends her the enclosed card [not included] to prove that is fame is 'More Than European!'

Is at present 'in a lazy state working languidly at an article [he has] to write for a new journal on Philosophy [Mind]'. Intends to be relatively idle for a few months, and does not feel inclined to work on a new book just yet. Is glad that [his cousin] Anne's wedding went off well. Reports that his uncle Robert wrote to him to say that [his cousin] Chris was considering coming to Cambridge to study Moral Sciences, and asks if she has heard anything about this. Does not feel sure that it is a wise scheme. Supposes that he has been stimulated by Stephen Marshall's example, 'and perhaps thinks home will be dull without Annie'. Hopes that she has a good visit at Lincoln [to the Bensons]. Informs her that 'H P. goes back to London early on the 5th July' and tells her to write to him before that.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Encloses 'the only letter which is come' that morning [not included], and describes the printed circulars which arrived: a notice of a half-yearly general meeting of the Pro[ ]s of the Scottish Australian Investment Company, and a notice of Henry having been made a member of the London Library. Also encloses a letter from Miss Clough [not included].

Claims that they 'scarcely feel afraid now of the war which appeared to some imminent' the previous day, and states that '[a]s Prince Leopold's Papa won't let him accept the Spanish Throne surely France can find no other pretext for such wanton bloodshed.' Refers to the weather in Rugby.

Reports that she has as yet had no letter from William, and states that she doesn't think that Arthur is strong, and that Dr [George?] Burrows advises against his playing certain games, such a croquet. Remarks that he must be careful if he goes to Switzerland. Reports that Mrs Trevelyan is unable to come to Rugby due to the heat, and 'is obliged to go to the sea with Lady Trevelyan.' Adds that Mr Trevelyan is to arrive in Rugby the following Friday. States that in a fortnight's time they will 'be free'.

Believes that Arthur will leave England about 2 August, and announces that she is to go with Mrs [Anne?] and Miss [Isabella?] Thompson about 10 August, as Mr [Reginald?] Thompson 'must attend some Law Court in August'. Asks Henry to tell her as soon as he knows where he is going. Adds that she sent his two Dividends in a registered letter to Berlin.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that she heard from Mr Balme that morning, and quotes from his letter the part which relates to Fred [or Frank?] Horton: that he will be glad to subscribe twenty pounds towards getting him to Cambridge, and to hear from Henry 'more details as to the proposed arrangement'. She is not sure whether this amount is 'just as a beginning...or whether it is all Mr. Balme intends to give'. Tells Henry to let her know when he has arranged anything for Horton.

Reports that she has heard from Arthur since the Trustees' Minute was published, and 'he says how amazed they are at the injustice and falsehood of such a document.' Adds that the only hope 'appears to be in the New Governing Body', and states that they have 'another Term of danger and difficulty before [them].' Asks him to let her know how he is, and if his arm is quite well. Announces that she is sending Mary to Wellington College 'to pay a visit to old Beth and see the country'. Thinks that the change will do her good, and sees it as a way to hear more of Minnie and her family.

Reports that she had a letter from Miss (Isabella?) Thompson that morning, telling her that she has heard from the Chairman of the Council of the London University who informs her that they are sending a representative to the New Governing Body of Rugby School. Adds that William 'looks better daily....'

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he and Nora cannot go to Cheltenham as his brother William and his wife are due to visit them, and then they are to go to the Symonds'. States that they must put off their arrival at Newcastle 'till the 2d: in order to s[ ] a day at Lincoln'. Reports that Edward White Benson is to be the new bishop of Truro. Asks Myers how he has got on with D[ ] 'in the intervals...of reading Mahaffy's reply!' Asks him to tell him 'how Jebb takes it'.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that she has had some short letters from their travellers [William and Isabella Sidgwick, on their honeymoon], the last two from Palermo, where they have been since 30 March. States that their passage from Naples was 'delightful', and that, according to William, the climate of Palermo is 'perfect', and that both Isabel and he are in good health. Complains that none of the letters sent to them, apart from one from Amabel Thompson have reached William and Isabel by 3 April. Quotes from his letter regarding their movements in Sicily, and where letters are to be sent.

States that she duly sent Mr Leevis' letter of introduction. Wishes that Henry would write to him, and tells him to let her know where he intends to go after he leaves Cambridge. Refers to Professor Maurice's death and asks him if it will make any difference in Henry's work. Claims that it is very pleasant being there [in Exeter], and that until that day they have been a large party. Reports that the bishop [Frederick Temple] is gone that day on Visitation journeys, and will be in London at the meeting of the Rugby Governing Body on the following Friday. Claims that they all miss him, and that he is 'quite the life and spirit of the whole party.' Refers also to their 'welcome for Miss Temple and the 2 girls'. States that the country is lovely and that they have daily drives 'through very pretty places or to see some beautiful spot miles off.' Thinks that she shall be there until the middle of the following week, and that after that she will 'be lingering about the neighbourhood - seeing 2 or 3 friends'.

Reports that Arthur says that he will be in the Lake Country until 17 [April], and then she thinks he goes to London, and maybe to Cambridge. Adds that Mr Robertson is '[positively] going to Harrow as a Master.' Claims that they are all anxious about the following Friday's meeting.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Says she was glad to receive his letter the previous night, and knew nothing beyond the fact that he and Nora were at Rugby. States that she would have joined their 'happy quartette' if she had been feeling better. Refers to Dr Andrew Clark's treatment, which she has begun. Reports having given up cocoa, and having changed her diet. Claims to be much more comfortable as regards her teeth, and hopes that she will not have to see Mr Rogers again for some time. Reports that she had a very pleasant letter from Charlotte [Sidgwick?], who seemed to have enjoyed Henry and Nora's visit. Refers to their imminent marriage, and suggests that he might like her to be there. States that Lucy Sidgwick has asked her if she will stay there all the time, but that she 'could only thank her and leave it uncertain.'

Reports that William has not been well, and that this has made him anxious to get away from Guernsey, but that the Head Master there depends on him, and has been unable to get a substitute. Refers to Isabel's last letter, in which she expresses the hope to be back by May. Asks Henry to accept the watch and chain [not included],and states that she will think of something else that he will like quite as well. Adds that there is his Uncle Lace's ten pounds and five pounds from his Uncle Robert, which he wishes her to help him in spending. Reports that he wrote very kindly about Henry's marriage.

Says that she would like to be 'an old Rugbeian on Sunday evening, to see that kind, good face, and hear those delightful harsh tones....' Relates that Mrs Talbot of Keble is very friendly with Ada [Benson], and that when Mrs [Agnes?] Wickham was staying with her 'she called upon Ada and told her everything delightful of Nora.' Reports that Mrs Vernon Harcourt came to see her the previous day and that 'she said she had often hear her sisters in law the Miss Harcourts speak of her as they lived in Carlton Gardens.' Refers to the fact that Oxford is 'going to keep' Professor Max Muller. Reports that Ada 'heard all the Discussions in [conversation] thro' Mr Bradley's kindness and then dined with the Max Mullers....' Adds that Mrs Muller is a great friend of Ada's. Expresses the wish that some professorship could be raised for 'poor William'.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to send the enclosed [introductions] [not included] to William. States that he acquired them from an acquaintance of his [Lewes]'who on Wednesday morning was totally ignorant of W's existence', and who had been mistaken for Henry by a lady, who congratulated him on his brother's marriage [to Isabel]. Having 'conceived immediately a lively interest in W. and hearing that he was gone to Sicily offered [Henry] the introduction to Signor Th[ ]', which Henry 'had not the heart to refuse'. He also received an introduction to Signor Salinas, [Professor of Archaeology at Palermo]. Asks her to write when her plans about going to Exeter are settled.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Is sorry that she takes 'so gloomy a view of [his sister] Mary's state.' Agrees that her mental state is unusual. Asks when the school reopens, and states that he would be very glad to come to Rugby for a night or two; suggests that he could come at the same time as William and Isabel. Asks her to tell Annie Sidgwick, or his aunt Mary Jane, 'that she could not possibly get more than a 3rd class according to [their] regulations'. Is glad to hear of [E.A.] Scott's reinstatement. Mentions that it has not taken place yet, but does not suppose that 'H. H[ayman]' can gain anything by interposing obstacles now.' Remarks that the latter appears to have got into very strained relations with the Board, and speculates as to Hayman's possible tactics in the matter. Concludes that 'if Rugby can once get rid of him, it does not matter much what he says'. Sends his love to [Mary's] children.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Explains that he had been expecting to hear her 'final views about the Greek', and says that he asked Mrs Peile to send her a circular. Still thinks that she would find it a mistake to learn Greek regularly, but offers his assistance nonetheless. Reports that their mother seems 'pretty well and in pretty good spirits', and that 'her absorbing interest is in Nevil, who has just left her.' Reports that they have seen Isabel, 'who seems to be going on well', and states that William 'is certainly not in a satisfactory state' according to their mother. Remarks that it is not surprising that he has no pupils yet, and thinks that he does not feel well enough to take them.

Discusses his thoughts on settling 'the exact amount of one's conscious need of dogmatic religion'. Claims that 'the consciousness of the comparatively low moral level on which [his] own nature seems to keep [him]' has often driven him to the verge of trying to alter his intellectual convictions, but that he has been prevented by the fear of moral deterioration. States that this dilemma 'belongs to some time ago', and that life has been made very smooth to him of late. Sends on his mother's love, and hopes that Minnie's children are all well again. Also sends Nora's love, and states that the latter is looking forward to seeing Minnie sometime in the following vacation. Sends their love to Edward, and looks forward to having them both in Cambridge in the following term.

Letter from Nora Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Incomplete. They have got summer at last 'and are even inclined to think it too hot' that day; hopes that Mary has nice weather also. Is particularly glad they have got a fine day since 'the Lewes'' [George Eliot and G. H. Lewes] have been with them since Thursday, as the guests of both Gurney and the Sidgwicks. Remarks on the difference the sun makes to Cambridge, and describes the effect of a summer sunset.

Was rather alarmed at the prospect of having Eliot there: '[o]ne feels beforehand as if she had such a terrible power of analysing ones character - that all ones defects would be more obvious to her than to oneself or anyone else'. However, she is not in reality at all alarming, and 'has an almost exaggerated gentleness of voice and considerateness of manner, and succeeds very quickly in putting one at ones ease'. She talks well, but not so brilliantly as one would expect, 'though she occasionally says good things'. Mr Lewes is an extremely good talker and 'can keep up a conversation for any length of time, and he tells stories well and has a great many of them, and mimics well, but he is not always quite in good taste.' It has been very pleasant having them there, and hopes that they will come again some day.

Admits that she and Henry feel a certain relief to have the house to themselves again after so many visitors. They intend going up to London on the following Thursday, and to stay there for three nights, as Henry's engagements make that necessary, though they may stay at home if he does not finish his book. From London they propose to go to Broadstairs if Isabel is still there. After this their plans become vague.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Asks her to forward the enclosed [not included] to Hugh. States that the story he sends 'is certainly one worth keeping, 'if the boys are sure of the detail[s] of the coincidence.' Reports that their evidence 'is growing very bulky: but the quality is...very various.' Hopes that she and her family are all well, and states that he and Nora had a good account of them on Tuesday from Miss Temple. Reports that Arthur and Charlotte were in Cambridge on Sunday 'in a prosperous condition', and that William and Isobel are expected 'in a few hours'. Hears that William is well and is in good spirits. Reports that he [Henry] went on a Psychical Research tour in the west a fortnight previously, 'and squeezed out a day at Clifton and walked about Durdham Down with Graham Dakyns.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he and Nora have to begin their journey to England [from Switzerland] the following day, as they have engagements all the following week. Regrets that there is no chance of meeting up with Minnie. Is sorry to hear about Hugh's health. Reports that Nora wrote to Isobel from Italy, giving their favourable view of William's condition; thinks that any advice as to how to deal with the situation 'would be dangerous' as it might make Isobel feel that they had gone over to William's side. Reports that he has had another letter from William, 'who has achieved the ascent of the "Grand Paradis" in which he has failed twice before in previous years.' Hopes that things 'will go all right when he gets home', but fears that if there is a spell of bad weather immediately after his arrival in England, they may go badly.