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Additional Manuscripts c Seeley, Sir John Robert (1834–1895) Knight, historian Lightfoot, Joseph Barber (1828-1889) Bishop of Durham
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Letter from J.R. Seeley to Henry Sidgwick

Claims that he does not understand what right Lightfoot can have 'to say that [they] shall all soon know.' Refers to 'Saturday's attack' on him [Seeley], and to Grote's paper, which he sends to him [not included]. Comments on Grote's criticisms of his work, in relation to moral history and the attribution to Christ of discoveries in morality. Refers to his attempt at 'a sketch of all philosophies of the [Stoic] kind.' Mentions the accusation of diffuseness made in the 'Quarterly'. Refers to Sidgwick's reference to Seneca, Epictetus and Amelius, and claims that these three 'are not in the strictest sense Stoics but original moralists thinking in a generally Stoical way'. Claims that desire must be controlled, 'but only in one way, by a stronger desire'.

Seeley, Sir John Robert (1834–1895) Knight, historian

Letter from J.R. Seeley to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to a new preface, which he sends to Sidgwick [not included], and which contains the answer to some of his objections. Asks for his criticisms, and that he send it back by the end of the week. States that he has said very little about 'the universality of [Christ]'s scheme', which Sidgwick questions, and that he has simply pointed out that the Evangelists agree about it. Asks whether Sidgwick believes that Christ actually fell below the Messianic ideal. Refers to the fact that the prophets always speak of Judaism as defined to cover the earth, and asks if he thinks that Christ [retired] from this position. Observes that the passages quoted by Sidgwick 'seem only to show that Christ intended to give the Jews a decided precedence', and claims that 'the point of that Syrophoenician story is not that Christ at first hesitated, but that he ultimately gave in. Refers to the story of the Good Samaritan, and to the Sermon on the Mount. Discusses the Evangelists' portrayal of Christ. Reports that 'Waring turns out not to be the author', and suggests that Lightfoot my have got hold of a small report. Remarks that the preface that he sends 'is in a very rough state and has a gap in the middle'.

Seeley, Sir John Robert (1834–1895) Knight, historian