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Dickinson, Goldsworthy Lowes (1862-1932) humanist, historian and philosopher
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Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

29 Beaufort Street, Chelsea SW. - He and Goldie [Dickinson] start tomorrow to bicycle to Failand: asks whether Trevelyan will be at Welcombe and able to put them up on Saturday night. If Trevelyan is not staying on at Welcombe, asks him to keep away from town for a day or two to give Mrs Smith a holiday, since they have 'played such a Box & Cox game that she hasn't had any as yet'

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Union Society, Cambridge. - Spent all day yesterday [the beginning of term?] 'seeing people and getting [his] pictures and books in'. Has put Bob's books, 'mostly school classics', in the gyp room. Likes his rooms very much: the two places he is 'fondest of in the world are the old court and the cloisters'. [Maurice] Amos is in [Bertrand] Russell's rooms, [George] Gooch the rooms opposite Collins's, and [Henry Graham] Dakyns in the 'tower by the carriage entrance'; these are 'historical stairs', since Horace Walpole visited a friend in Dakyns' new rooms. MacT[aggart]'s lectures will be attended by 'Amos, Gooch, a lady, and Dickinson and Wedd probably'. Has acquired two statuettes of Assyrian kings, copied from originals in the British Museum, which he thinks are 'very fine' and 'almost as original' as Bob's 'Hindoo god was'. Came by the late train, so had no evening in London to go to the theatre. Amos has heart trouble, 'having overworked himself', and may even be unfit to study this year: MacT[aggart] says he is well ahead with his reading and could do his tripos with not much more work if the worst came; his mother is here and George took tea with her and Maurice yesterday. Asks if Bob has any 'gossip or scandal' from [Harrow] Founder's Day. Notes in a postscript that the 'two fellows who live opposite you [ie Theodore and Crompton Llewelyn Davies]' were here recently 'both in great force', Theodore bathed 'on a raw morning with Moore as usual'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Union Society, Cambridge. - Is sending the books. They talk here of 'nothing but the School board now': McT[aggart] is 'Rileyite of course', but Sanger and Dickinson are opposed to him. Is going to the [Harrow] 'Old Boy's' on 1 December, and asks if Bob will also be there; also asks what there will be to see in London around the 12th, and whether Bob will be at Wallington at all this vacation. Is appreciating Wordsworth for the first time, in Matthew Arnold's selection, the only way he has found so far of 'getting at him through the mass of rubbish with which he surrounded his throne'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Originally enclosing an account for housekeeping expenses: Trevelyan should take off the rent if he did in fact pay up to Lady Day. Explains how he has reckoned coal and wine. Had a good time on the river: Jack [McTaggart] 'delighted with his own absurdities and limitations'. Is going to Heathfield [Heathfield Park, home of William Cleverly Alexander?] again to paint.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Dated 'Sunday'. Apologises for not sending the books earlier; was very busy with the lectures and with arranging for his parents visiting to see Helen [Coombe]; Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] and 'a sister' have also been staying. Has filled the box up with clothes which Mrs Smith [their landlady] thought Bob 'ought to want'. Says 'I told you so' about Bob being in Italy: it is better than 'going Jonkopping in Sweden [visiting Jönköping?]' and he might get some work done; suggests going to Fiesole or Prato, though that might be too hot. Asks if Bob intends to stay till winter; if so they will arrange to meet. Everything now settled: he and Helen hope to marry early in November and come out to Italy. Has had 'rather an awful time with his parents': very sorry for his father and his disappointment in him and so 'made a huge effort to get through the misunderstanding' but only gave him and his mother pain. This has made him 'awfully depressed'; found it hard to 'pull himself together for the lectures' but thinks they were the best he has done; pleased that both Goldie and [Thomas Sturge?] Moore liked them. Has been bicycling with Goldie, who is 'getting more reconciled about Helen'; thinks he 'begins to see that it can't make any real difference between [them]'. They went to Woodbridge and tried but failed to find [Edward] Fitzgerald's grave, then to Dedham 'which is the only [piece of French country in England and explains Constable'. Helen's harpsichord [which she is decorating for Arnold Dolmetsch] is 'going to be a great success'; she is 'quite decided' that Bob must either come back for the wedding or meet them in Italy.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Naples. - They go to Rome in two days, and can be reached there by Post[e] Rest[ante]. Bob must be generous to this letter as it was written 'after a day of rain & scirocco and sight seeing'. The news about 'Mrs Bertie' [Alys Russell?] has made them 'pretty indignant, and supports Helen's opinion of the character of 'P. Smith' [housekeeper at Beaufort Street?]. Bob, with his 'horror of moving & doing household things' will suffer; perhaps he should stay at Welcombe.. Jokingly suggests then 'retract[s]' the idea that Bob should 'spend three years choosing or educating a wife'. Thanks Bob for al he 'did about the picture'; he and Mrs W[iddrington?] have been marvellous about it. A confusion over Taormina involving [Alfred?] Thornton and [Francis?] Bate. Never got chance to continue with the Galatea picture, but hopes he might yet finish it; has done 'lots of studies of seaweed etc', and Goldie [Dickinson] has seen the painting and likes it. He and Helen had 'rather a serious time' when his parents came; they arrived a day early with 'all the other people whom we'd offended, including Ezekiel'. The talk was 'geological' rather than 'the wild orgies of the [Terence?] Bourke regine & the fierce gladiatorial shows... of [Bob's] reign'; assures Bob that their arguments do not matter; means to find out 'what it is that annoys some people so much in my way of arguing). His father was 'very nice' and got on well with Helen; his parents took her off on a driving tour of Etna while he himself stayed to work. Tells of visiting 'Mrs C' [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan] with his parents, and being menaced by her dogs. They went several times to see the Gramonts [Grandmonts] and had some 'splendid music', with ' more kindly scandal from Mrs G.'; they are nice people. Not enough time to tell of their 'quaint adventures at Pestum and Agropoli', and Pompeii, 'the apotheosis of shoddy' and so quite loveable, as 'immoral as the Brighton pavillion [sic] and as charming as a Japanese toy'. They stopped there a week at a 'filthy inn' where Goldie, [Nathaniel] Wedd and [Augustus Moore] Daniel came to stay: Daniel great fun, Wedd 'cussing & swearing because its not England'; got on 'splendidly with them'. He and Helen are now staying in Santa Lucia; he goes out in the morning to buy bread and ricotta at street stalls, and milk straight from the 'street cows'; they have been up Vesuvius. Reassures Bob about his poetry: he and many others have 'betted heavily' on him so he must 'make a success of it'; is sure he himself will, having been just where Bob is; 'one comes though by mere pigheadedness'.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

1 All Souls' Place. - Should like to come and stay with Trevelyan before the end of the month, but is not sure when. Thinks he will go to the procession [for Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee]; if he could find a companion, he would bicycle to Portsmouth on Saturday and see the ships [the review of the Fleet at Spithead]. Asks if Trevelyan will accompany him.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Has seen Dr Chambers: he thinks that Helen is much the same, though Helen's sister Mildred considers that she is much brighter. Is not going to see her yet; waiting is 'slow and weary work'. He and Goldie Dickinson are enjoying Roundhurst very much: Mrs Entiknapp [Enticknap] is very good to them and Augustus approves of them. Is going on with his illustrations though Macmillan's plan for an illustrated M. Arnold is not good for his prospects. Hopes Trevelyan will have a good time with B. [Berenson?]: must not let him criticise too much. Will probably go to London for good soon as he has a lot of lecture work to do, though he is far less unhappy in the country.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hitchin Croft, Churt, Farnham (a house kept by the late Liberal candidate for Hitchin [John Wattridge], who is now Conservative agent here). - Felt he needed to rest on Sunday so instead of visiting Trevelyan they read Goldie [Dickinson's] dialogue in the sun. Has been to London to work on his lectures and see about the house. He, Mrs Widdrington and a cabinet maker have been again to see if there is any dry rot but it passed the test and he will now try to get it. The news from R[oe]Hampton [of Helen Fry] is good but there is little change, and Dr Savage says she is unlikely to be much better for months. Asks Trevelyan to tell Berenson he will visit his hotel next Wednesday and apologises for not seeing him on Sunday. Asks when the final proofs [of Trevelyan's "Mallow and Asphodel"?] are coming out; hopes he will become very learned about the Oxford drawings.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

King's College, Cambridge. - Has asked his sisters to get him a ticket for "Tristan" as he wanted to take someone who will be staying with them; however, if there are none left he would like to use Trevelyan's. Is not sure whether he will be able to go to "Orfeo". Roger [Fry] has just started back. Mention of a 'wretched business' [the illness of Fry's wife?]

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Little news: Helen is more or less the same, though he thinks her sisters' visits help and her brother is going to see her soon, and this stage might go on for some time. He and Goldie [Dickinson] are enjoying Roundhurst, though he has been up at the British Museum all the week. Saw Binyon: does not think the anthology ["Garland of New Poetry" (1899)?] will be good; it is mostly Miss Coleridge and a few others; thinks Binyon has closed the subscription list. Asks Trevelyan to tell Berenson he is working on the dating of pictures: mentions two works by Gentile [Bellini]. Augustus [Enticknap] has whooping cough. A separate sheet added as postscript encourages Trevelyan to write a simple letter to Helen with advice on what to put: thinks 'part of the depression comes from an idea that she has done wrong and people disapprove'. Thanks Trevelyan's mother: grapes would be welcome.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst. - Roger [Fry] is leaving for London towards the end of the month; asks if he himself can stay on for a while and ask a friend [name illegible] to join him, as he is fond of the place and of Augustus (though 'the poor child has got hooping-cough'). Roger 'keeps up', but collapses when he goes to town. No change in Helen's condition. Is getting on with his dialogues, and reading "Sidonia" [Meinhold's "Sidonia von Borke: die Klosterhexe" or "Sidonia the Sorceress"] and wonders why Trevelyan thinks so much of it. Visited the Tennysons recently; remarks on what a 'fat lethargic domestic chief' [Hallam Tennyson] is. 'Kittie' Bathurst is there: asks if Trevelyan knows her. Dickinson and Lord Tennyson played cricket against the boys and were well beaten. Asks to be remembered to Berenson. Has been seeing something of the 'Friday's Hill' people [the Pearsall Smiths].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst,. - Has opened and looked at Trevelyan's Harunobu print and congratulates him on the purchase. Fry will make Berenson envious when they meet, as Mrs [Mary] Costelloe came over to Roundhurst the other day: it was a struggle for her to conceal her feelings. Went to Friday's Hill [home of the Pearsall Smiths] yesterday. No fresh news from Roehampton [of Helen Fry]: sometimes it seems impossible to go on. Will leave on Thursday with much regret as the house and Goldie [Dickinson] have made life bearable; thinks he will go to 12 Pembroke Square, Mrs Sickert's house. He and Goldie slept out in Trevelyan's field two nights ago.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Thanks Bob for the books [Bob's "Mallow and Asphodel"?]; had already seen Oswald Sickert's copy ; agrees that black [covers?] would have been better, but 'some day we will elaborate together an edition de luxe'. Will send on [Robert] Bridges's copy though he is 'rather angry' with him at the moment, will tell Bob why when they see each other. Dined with [Bernard] Berenson last night, who is 'interesting & he admires Goldie [Dickinson] immensely' so Fry will like him. He may take Bob's book when he goes to see Helen on Saturday, an experiment he 'half long[s] for and half dread[s]'; will write to Bob or Goldie about the visit but fears it will not have any effect.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, Dorking. - Is glad Trevelyan is back: will be working on the Colchester lecture until the 18th so invites him to visit then. The Albert Hall ones are finished and went well. He and Helen have not yet found Trevelyan a house, though the one they looked at [see 4/20] is still free; the wine has not arrived yet. Asks how Trevelyan's play "Cecilia" ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] is getting on. Helen and Goldie [Dickinson] are 'offensively & increasingly Daily Telegraphic together'.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Thinks Bob cannot be 'in love a bit' - he is 'so disgustingly reasonable'; why is he thinking about 'acting wisely' when he should be feeling that he does not 'care a damn whether [he is] or not'. George has only seen [Elizabeth] once, and still gave him a 'much more favourable description' than Bob had managed with his '"tolerably accomplished for a young lady" and all that sort of thing'. Cannot ever remember being really pleased before that one of his friends was going to be married; hopes it will make Bob 'work properly which will be a splendid thing'. Asks him to send 'accurate details as to intellect & views of life of Miss van [der] Hoeven'. Expects it's 'still a secret'; announced it at the [Apostles] Society, and also told Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] on Sunday, who 'said "Good God!"' but Sanger supposes he will have 'sufficiently recovered from his astonishment' by now to write. All 'fog & rain & general damnation' here, with the 'climax of [Sanger's] miseries' being the party his mother is going to give, to which she will invite his friends and they will accept; asks if Bob agrees with his own loathing of parties, and hopes that 'there won't be many in hell'. Has not yet seen McT[aggart]'s wife, but reports of her are so 'rediculously [sic] favourable' that he is bound to be disappointed when he does. Has reclaimed something [illegible] for Bob, having 'meekly paid the money' as he 'felt too lazy to make a fuss'. Sends love to Roger and regards to Mrs Fry.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

1 All Souls Place, Portland Place, W. - Rather surprised by news of Trevelyan's engagement; general thoughts on marriage; is sure Trevelyan has chosen well and looks forward to meeting his fiancé. It is good that she is a musician. Roger [Fry] has returned, and he thinks of going to see him. Still not certain whether Ferdinand [Schiller] will return to India or not, 'so my life is hanging in the balance too'. Fears he cannot share Roger's interest in pictures; the only picture he cares for in the U.C.A.C. is Fry's 'Pool'. Asks if he Trevelyan has read Stephen Phillips' 'Paolo and Francesca'. Hopes he has a good time in Ravello.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - There is not sufficient paper in the hotel to answer her long letter as it deserves. Strange that he is not inspired to write Bessie love-poetry, but says he is 'not good at putting difficult and elaborate and wonderful thoughts into verse', which would be needed; will try one day. Sorry that Gredel [Guije] failed. Since he sometimes misses out words in his letters, Bessie need never be shocked by his 'wicked opinions' but can add 'nots' when she pleases and 'convert the sense to please [her] fancy'. Glad she is re-reading [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant". Sends her kisses "blown through the ether like waves of light or electricity'. Continues the letter next morning, copying out an extract about Shorthouse from a piece of paper in Mrs Reid's book an extract from a letter from Isabel Balfour; this recalls what his brother [George?] has heard about Shorthouse. The book reminds Bob of Pater's "Marius the Epicurean"; thinks one must have influenced the other; also thinks "Marius" the better book on the whole. Asks his waiter to settle their dispute about Italian grammar, which he does in Bob's favour. Returns to the letter in the afternoon: old Palumbo died this morning, and since his wife did not want Bob to leave, he is staying in a separate part of the house where he is 'quite out of the way'. News has just come that the Cappuccini hotel at Amalfi 'has subsided on a great part of it' and some people have been killed. Writes again in the evening having gone to see the landslip, which was as bad as the rumours; seven or eight people died, and 'part of the end of the hotel had gone'. The people say it is St. Francis' doing, "angry because his monastery had been put to base uses". Had never been to Amalfi before, though this is his third visit; not much to see 'except the people and the beggars', and the Cathedral is 'spoilt by restoring'. Palumbo was dying about the same time as the landslip, and the proprietor of the Cappuccini, a friend, was here comforting Madame Palumbo when the news about the hotel came. 'They say he almost fainted... [and] will probably be ruined, as no one will dare come to his hotel now'. Bob exerted himself greatly on the journey down to Amalfi and back and 'sweeted (in Grandmont language' despite the bitter cold.

Originally enclosing a 'charming letter from [Eddie] Marsh'; his 'first Cambridge friend' who works in the Colonial office 'though, like many there, he does not like the war'; gives a brief character sketch. Has also heard from [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson. Has not heard from [Bernard] Berenson, but has from [Mary] Costelloe, whom he just asked Berenson to tell; 'rather annoying', as he 'care[s] for Berenson very much, and dislike Mrs C.', though it was a 'perfectly proper letter'. Is very troubled by [Lina] Duff Gordon's letter: her wish for his happiness is 'unmistakeably sincere', as she always is, but her reply to his wish for them to remain as good friends is that since he told her nothing about this when he saw her 'constantly' in London last October, things can never be quite the same. It would have been very difficult to tell her, but feels that perhaps he should have done, not because she was an 'intimate friend' - the only one of his friends he told, 'for special reasons', was Fry - but because Mrs Costelloe had been spreading rumours that she was in love with him. Perhaps this was true, and he should have realised, although he does not think he gave her reason to believe he was in love with her; it is possible that Mrs Costelloe has stirred up trouble, as 'she has a great influence over Miss D. G.' and he believes her 'really to be a bad woman, though with many good qualities'. Is going to see Palumbo's funeral start for Naples. Writes again in the evening, after writing at 'my cliff, the Cembrone [Cimbrone]'. Quotes from a letter from Tom Moore: Moore thinks he will 'make a good husband' but spoil all his children. Has received Bessie's next letter, but not the photographs. He can skate, but not very well. Does not think Buller's defeat will make much difference to British attitudes to the [Second Boer] war; discussion of the war; does not think it would be good if all of South Africa were governed by the Dutch, would not object to 'an independent Dutch South Africa if it were well governed, and the natives treated properly' which currently happens in the Cape but not in the Transvaal. Methuen and probably Buller are not equal to the people against them, but this does not mean the English have fought badly; however, she need not worry that he is 'becoming Jingo'. Sorry Bessie has missed Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s violin; when one good enough becomes available, will get it for her. They must visit Ravello together; Madame asked if they would come here on their honeymoon, which they will have to discuss; she intends to keep the hotel for some years at least.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

British Museum. - Encloses Luzac's receipt, which she may give to her uncle. Spent yesterday afternoon at Highgate listening to [Thomas Sturge] Moore's new poetry, which was 'very refreshing'; Moore liked his bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though suggested some alterations; did not show him his play but hopes to do so soon. Has just seen [Laurence] Binyon has shown him a 'new ode of Tristram and Iseult' ["Tristram's End"] which is 'quite good but perhaps not first class'. Is taking Moore's play "Mariamne" to Dorking to read again and hopes to be 'in train' to do something himself. Will not order the beds until nearer the time he goes to Holland, but will talk to [Roger] Fry about the bedroom; she shall see and approve the colour before he distempers the walls. Tends to agree with her that they should economise on furnishing, to leave 'a good margin' for things such as foreign travel; he still also wants her to have a new violin. Is dining this evening with [Charles] Sanger, [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson and [Desmond] MacCarthy; Sanger is 'not at all well'; hopes his Greek journey will put him right. Copies out some lines from Binyon's Tristram poem. Very glad that Bessie's aunt was so much better on her return; wonders if the Luzacs have called; the Sickerts know a Hague painter called [Dirk] Jansen, whom they like but do not care much for his painting.

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