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Hubrecht, Paul François (1829-1902) lawyer and politician
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Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - They have not yet retired to their 'Retraite Edéniencee [ie, at Ede]', as her cousin calls it; does not think they will go before early June. The Grandmonts are still where she left them at Rocca Bella [Taormina, Sicily] at the end of April; they are travelling back with an English friend, stopping only briefly at Florence and Bâle. Was sorry to leave Italy 'like that' but it could not be helped; made her all the more anxious to return another time. Wrote to her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht] and sent her Trevelyan's messages, but does not know whether she will go to England this summer; he does not seem anxious to go and she supposes 'the husband's opinion has great weight in these matters!'. She herself will not be able to; is currently here alone at home with her uncle and aunt [Paul François Hubrecht and his wife Maria] and would not like to leave them when she would have to go 'to fit in with Senior's week at St. Andrews'. Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and the trouble he took with the list of books, though she has not yet got all those he suggested, in part because the library is currently closed. Fortunately the director is a friend of the family and can be persuaded to break the rule forbidding books to be taken or sent into the country, so they sometimes get a good selection sent to Ede; however spring-cleaning is 'a holy business' in this country so she must wait. Asks if Trevelyan could possibly send some of the books he listed: something by Henry James; his father's book; [Robert] Browning's letters; she will get [William?] Morris's "Life" [by J. W. MacKail and his brother's book from the library. Has been reading [Elizabeth Barrett Browning's] "Aurora Leigh" for the first time; asks whether Trevelyan likes it. Will be curious to see Trevelyan's friend [Thomas Sturge Moore]'s poems which he sent to her cousin; wonders whether they will appreciate it; does not think Mrs Grandmont has 'specially classical tastes'. Would be very nice if Trevelyan could come to Ede this summer; unsure still of when exactly would be the best time as she knows nothing of the Grandmonts' plans; thinks probably late August or early September. Is longing to get to fresh air in the country; town seems oppressive after Taormina.

They all feel 'greatly honoured... with all these noble peace delegates' being at the Hague; the Congress was opened yesterday; one of the Dutch members told them 'what a feeble old president Baron de Staal seemed to be' and that 'the first meeting did not promise much'. Is sending some Taormina photographs; the one with Mrs C [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan?] is 'funny but too indistinct'; [Giuseppe] Bruno took the same view which better shows Mrs C. 'like some curious prehistoric Juliet on her balcony'; she has it and will show it to you, or Trevelyan could write to Bruno and ask to see the several pictures he took in her garden of her 'constructions'. Glad Trevelyan has heard some good music in London; she feels out of practice and is looking forward to playing with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] again. Knows her aunt is giving her the biography of Joachim by Moser for her birthday. Will also have to 'make special Vondel studies this summer'; feels she knows very little about him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'my dear Bob'; is very glad to hear from him; was just last week that she left Amsterdam and he went with Paul [Hubrecht?] 'to visit Volendam and buy Dutch cheeses' but it seems a long time ago. Paul wrote a 'rather amusing & ironical account of that day'. He must have had a bad crossing as the weather has been 'most depressing ever since'; 'poor Grandmont is shivering & probably longing to get away', but the coming of Bob's friends the [Roger] Frys will keep them longer. Will miss them very much; Bramine has 'proven to be such a friend', she has told her everything and she is 'a great help'. All her family 'have a somewhat inquisitive if not suspicious turn of mind' and have begun to have suspicions about her and Bob; not in an unkind sense but they want to know 'exactly what happened or did not happen'. Her uncle, aunt, and [cousin] Marie stayed with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] in Amsterdam; is sure they compared notes. Bramine is a help to 'appease their minds'; would also help if Trevelyan wrote a 'collins' to her aunt which will make it 'all look more natural'. She and Bob must continue to be quite 'sincere and truthful' with each other, and 'everything will come right in the end'; scolds him a little for leaving the house without saying goodbye to her uncle or Grandmont, though her family found his absent-midnedness comical.

Is writing in the drawing room, hearing the 'continual tinkle tinkle of the piano' as Grandmont practises some Haydn trios. They spent at the evening recently at the house of the painter [Willem?] Witsen, where Bramine works at her etching every day; played some music and even persuaded Witsen to join them with his cello, though he is 'terribly shy and modest' he plays very well. Has been practising hard herself recently, as she wants to be in good shape if she goes to have lessons from the new teacher in Amsterdam who has replaced her old teacher [Joseph] Cramer. Asks how Bob's new house is getting on; asks its name and address, and when he will move in. He will miss the Frys at first; hopes they like the Dutch cheese, and that it will not be 'like the story of the cheese in [Jerome's] "Three Men in a Boat"'. Is reading Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser], and has given up the Brownings' letters for a while. 'Correspondence is unsatisfactory in so many ways'; wishes she could see more of Bob, though she tells him not to 'interpret this for more than [she means] it'; tells him to write as often and fully as he can. Will try to puzzle over his 'metaphysical quotation', though doubts she will understand it entirely without further explanation; wonders about the value of such questions, though she does greatly admire 'the philosophical turn of mind' as long as it does not hamper any other enquiry. Bramine sends kind regards to Bob; she and Grandmont apparently always speak of him 'by that disrespectful name', so she supposes she may also. Notes in a postscript that he did not tell her how old he is; guesses twenty-seven.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Is glad Bob thinks 'as strongly about what is called English "Patriotism" just now' as they do; it is certainly 'a lamentable affair' and war seems unavoidable. Bramine [Hubrecht] was shocked when she read her Bob's wish for a 'fiasco, not so much for the sake of the Boers as for our own' as she 'feels very strongly for the Boers'. Read full account of the Trafalgar Square meeting the morning before Bob's letter came; was startled to hear he had been there as the newspaper account was nowhere near 'as dull & pacific' as he found it. Bramine has just brought her a letter from Mrs [Helen] Fry to Bob, which she should have given to him on his arrival; hopes this has not caused him or the Frys any inconvenience. Asks if the 'Japanese melodrama' was any good, and whether he is still in London. Suggests he uses foreign paper for his letters; his last was over-weight; makes a pun about his letters becoming 'too dear' for her. His letter is 'very valuable to her... whatever the future may have in store'. Wishes they could see each other more often, but does not think they should 'force circumstances'; admits she is a 'muddled creature' and does not yet see what is right and what she feels; hopes she will get clearer, while Bob is 'noble & generous & will wait', which she thinks is better for both their sakes. Discusses a line from Balzac. Will ask for more reading suggestions when she has finished the ones she wants to read; has just finished [Joseph] Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser] and 'worship[s] him all the more'. Bob is also a 'shrewd guesser of age', as she turned twenty-four on May 21st. Always used to be thought older than she was till a few years ago when the reverse became true. Thinks it is comical how few people, especially women, are 'perfectly natural' about their age; asks if Bob has 'often had the benefit of women in society and friendship'. Last week she and her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht] went to see "Citio", at Doorn, where they are to go next summer; it is smaller than the one at Ede but nicely situated and they wil probably like it. The Grandmonts are to leave by the end of next week; the Röntgens are coming for the day next Sunday to 'say farewell to Ede. She [Mien Röntgen] was married from this house'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede; envelope addressed to R. C. Trevelyan Esq-re, 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London EC - Is writing having got up very early to see the [Roger] Frys off. Curious to see which weaknesses of hers have inspired Bob to 'compile sharp satires'; does not think he has had the opportunity to get to know her faults, proved by him saying she seems to be wiser than he is and 'so sensible', though 'that is a common mistake' and her family tease her for looking like a 'wise professor'. She does not think she knows many of his weak spots, except for the very obvious ones, which are not heavy; has been very impressed by his 'excellencies & learnedness', and 'used to feel a great dunce' at Taormina though this has worn off a little. Describes the [Roger] Frys' visit: went to the Hague with Bramine to hear a concert of a cappella music conducted by [Johannes] Messchaert; returned next morning on the same train as the Frys and met at Ede station. Dreadful weather all through their visit, but they had some walks (on the second day only Mr Fry, her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht] and Elisabeth herself kept going); played them music on both nights (as Bob said, they 'liked the old music best on the whole), and yesterday morning Grandmont read them 'a great part of [Browning's] "Pippa Passes" in his translation', surprising that Mr Fry had never read it. All very sorry they had to leave so soon; the Frys promised to come again in the spring. Would very much like to get to know them better. Did not see much of what Bob says about Roger Fry's 'orthodoxy', except when he said that in music and painting, it was not possible to properly appreciate 'modern development of art' if you were not a real admirer of what has gone before; might be true of painting but she is sure it is not of music. He seemed generally to be 'a very charmingly sympathetic & very intelligent being', and she to be 'perhaps more original even, very clever certainly'; Elizabeth 'felt a dunce again'. Her uncle also liked them very much.

Last Sunday was very happy: her sister and her husband [the Röntgens] and the 'four Hubrechts from Utrecht' [Ambrosius Hubrecht and family] came for the day to say goodbye to 'Ma Retraite'; her cousin Professor Hubrecht is 'always full of fun' and it was very different from what one might imagine 'a Dutch stolid serious family party to be!' Finds it delightful to be part of such a family bond. Approves of Bob's 'plans about building public baths' but does not think the public would use them; certainly the Dutch do not wash 'their bodies as well & as often as their houses, streets, & furniture'. Tells Trevelyan how to write out a Dutch address, though there is no reason not to follow the common English custom of using English names and spelling for 'everything foreign'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hotel Prinz Heinrich, Dorothea Strasse, Berlin. - He and Helen have just returned from an excellent concert: Beethoven and Mozart. Describes their stay at Ede with the family of Trevelyan's friend Elizabeth van der Hoeven [soon to become his fiancée]: they liked the 'old people' very much - the old man [Paul François Hubrecht] reminded Fry of Mr Behrens; gives his impression of Elizabeth who was 'rather shy and inaccessible'. A sister [Maria Hubrecht?] of Madame Grandmont was also there: the Frys thought her paintings (canvas painted to look like tapestry) were dreadful. M. [Alphonse] Grandmont read some of his French translation of Browning's "Pippa Passes"; thinks Trevelyan is wrong about him and that he has more artistic sensibility than his wife, whose 'Ruskinian idealism' has 'deadened her sensations' and who follows the modern trend Fry deplores of always looking for 'meanings & messages' in art. Heard the Biebers [sic: a work by Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber]: Elizabeth is 'most accomplished' but the piece was too modernized; and Handel. Came to Berlin yesterday and the art collection is splendid; comment on German taste.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Apologises for not replying sooner; went to Cambridge on Saturday and found 'so much to do and talk about' that there was no time to write. Is going to Dorking tomorrow as his furniture is coming; the house should have been ready a week ago. Will dine with his mother that evening, then on Thursday he is going to Harrow to play [rugby] football against the school on Founders' Day; afterwards will dine at the Headmasters' and go to a 'smoking concert'; the day after that he will dine at his father's club. Will only then really begin the solitude of his 'rural retreat' and is looking forward to 'a quiet and industrious time at last'. Glad Bessie liked the Frys and they got on well with her uncle; not surprised she found 'a certain difficulty in becoming intimate with them', since he thinks Fry's mind is very different to hers and that he is not always quick to adapt himself, while Helen Fry is not like that but is often 'rather diplomatic in conversation until she knows all about a person'; this is not insincerity, as some people think. Heard from them today [see 4/27]; they enjoyed their visit, and Fry seems to have taken 'tremendously' to her uncle and aunt. Went to Highgate last week to see Tom [Sturge] Moore the poet, who read two new poems; criticises the first line of the one about Leda and the swan; Moore is 'always charmingly good-natured when one criticises, and sometimes even will be convinced.' Spent most of yesterday talking to Tom's brother [George] the philosopher. Great excitement at Trinity as the philosopher MacTaggart [sic: John McTaggart], who used to 'disapprove of marriage on metaphysical grounds, is bringing home a New Zealand hospital nurse called Daisy Bird as his wife'; he may need consolation as on his return from his year in New Zealand he will find that Moore and another [Bertrand Russell?], 'his most promising pupils and followers, have set up an entirely new and antagonistic system of the universe'. Sat at dinner at Trinity next to a science fellow [John Newport?] Langley whom he likes very much, who knows and thinks highly of [Ambrosius?] Hubrecht; Langley asked whether "[Till] Eulenspiegel" was originally written in Flanders; perhaps Grandmont knows. Has begun to learn German; finding it easier than expected in some ways, but has not yet got far. What Bessie says about women's tendency to either conceal or be overly frank about their ages seems more or less true to him; her allusion to his having had 'the benefit of women's society and friendship' amuses him, as if she wanted to make him 'a sort of Platonic and sentimental Don Juan' which he is certainly not; before her he has known very few women well, and only in one or two cases has he known them ' rather sentimentally' at some point; does not consider himself 'at all learned in women's psychology and character'. Finishing this letter in the room of a friend who has 'studied the female character far more profoundly', but since he has never fallen in love to his knowledge, Bob looks on him as his inferior.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill-House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - They seem to be in similar circumstances this week: she has been helping to clean her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]'s big bookcases; the charwoman who helped her 'was amusing enough' and made some 'delightfully naïve remarks' about the books. Elizabeth sometime lends books for her or her boys to read. Last Monday they moved to the Hague; the three summers they have spent at Ede seem to have passed very quickly, thinks they were 'the happiest & most interesting' parts of her life so far so she has become attached to the place and 'even to the ugly house' and is sad to think of the new 'unsympathetic' owner changing it, though he can do little to the woods and moors. Is going to spend a few days at Almelo with an old married friend whom she has not seen for some time; she is very musical and her husband seems to be a good pianist; also Marie [Hubrecht's] American friend Maud Howard is coming to stay tomorrow and she is 'not over anxious to see much of her'. Marie is then going to spend the winter in Florence though, like Maud Howard, she is a little vague about her plans.

Has changed her mind about 'forcing circumstances' and now thinks it would be good to see Bob again; suggests he comes over to the Hague next month, on the pretext of doing some work such as a translation of [Joost van] Vondel with which she could help, to make it seem less strange to her uncle and aunt; would have to ask him to stay at a hotel unless her uncle invites him to stay, and knows all this will give him trouble. He must write and tell her sincerely what he thinks. She has discussed the plan with Bramine [Hubrecht] who reassured her there was nothing wrong with it. Gives the address of her friend at Almelo, Mrs Salomonson Asser.

Has just seen a portrait of Bob's father 'on an old Financial Reform Almanack'; remarks on his 'charming eyes'. Hopes Bob is enjoying himself bringing 'dry bones' to live. Asks if he went to the concerts [given by Julius Engelbert Röntgen and Johannes Messchaert] and appreciated the singer. Is reading the Brownings' letters again, which are charming but get terribly sentimental. The [Second Boer] war is indeed horrible; asks if there are reasonable views on its duration and 'what the end can be'; asks whether there are as many 'contradictory muddling telegrams' in British newspapers as in Dutch ones; glad that there are 'so many rightly thinking English', but they are still a minority. The Grandmonts are at Florence, but unfortunately will have left by the time the Frys arrive. Very kind of Trevelyan to transcribe some of his verses for her; looks forward to reading them though she says she is a 'highly unpoetical being'. Signs herself 'Bessie'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Apologises for using 'lubberly thick English' paper. Came to London to hear [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen on Monday, but found he was ill and the concert off; hopes it is nothing serious. Went to hear [Hans] Richter conduct Tchaikowsky's 6th Symphony instead. Fears she may not have got the letter with his poetry last week, as he thinks he addressed it wrongly. Agrees that Bessie's proposal that he should come to see her again in the Netherlands [see 9/9] is indeed bold, but is very glad she has made it. On his side, the difficulties are small: he can easily conceal his visit, or let it be known that he is calling there on the way to Italy. Feels that the excuse she suggests of them translating Vondel together is very thin; true that he would like to read some with her, and that she could teach him German or 'even Dutch', though he does not feel ready to learn both at the same time; however, her family are still likely to see through this, 'especially if they were suspicious before'. Perhaps it would be better to be more honest with them; otherwise, would be willing not to go and see her at home at all, but for them to meet privately at his hotel and talk or go for walks. Realises that she will probably think this wrong, and her feelings must be 'paramount', though see it would be difficult and perhaps 'unwise' for her to take her uncle and aunt into her confidence. Will want 'horribly' to be with her all day, as he always does. She must decide what is best; expects her uncle will think he has come to see her whatever excuse they give. Promises to be 'quite reasonable, and prudent, though very much in love'. Must not read the Brownings' letters, or he will start writing 'too sentimentally'. Has had a 'rather nasty business looking after [Roger] Fry's affairs', his publisher [Oldmeadow] is 'swindling him' and he has had to write a long letter to Fry. Will give this letter to [Charles] Sanger to post as he is going out for a post; he may wonder 'who the lady with the long foreign name is' but will not tell him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Is very sorry she did not know in time to tell Bob the concert last Monday was cancelled; it was not [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen but [Johannes] Messchaert who was ill; he still cannot sing so the second concert will also be put off. Very sad as they would have had a good audience, and he will have to pay the costs. Has received Bob's poems and enjoyed reading them on the way to Almelo last Monday; likes part of 'the Indian poem' very much, though it is rather vague; the 'fairy poem' is charming and she wishes she had the power to set it to music; questions his choice of interpretation in the line of his Ronsard translation.

Is very glad Bob will come to The Hague; he is right that she would not like him to come without her family knowing; she is not under such 'romantically difficult' circumstances to make that necessary and what she said about their 'suspicions' probably made a stronger impression than she intended. Bramine [Hubrecht] even encouraged her to tell them about it; it would not be 'so unwise', since she is 'in reality quite free and independent', and if she could tell her aunt and be sure she would discuss it with her uncle, she might; however, thinks she would not feel real freedom when Bob was here if they knew what had happened. She will therefore tell her aunt that Bob intends to come over and do some translation work with her, asking her aunt to trust her and help 'conquer any objections' her uncle may have though she thinks he will agree at once. Marie [Hubrecht] and her American friend Maud [Howard] leave either next Monday or Tuesday, Marie for Florence and Maud for America via Paris; all three servants are then leaving in the first week of November so the household will be unsettled, and her aunt is suffering from a bad cold, so she will write as soon as all is well. Asks if he would prefer a first-rate hotel or a moderate one.

On the whole, had a good time at Almelo though it was strange to spend so much time with her friend [Adriana Salomonson Asser] after so long but they struck up quite a friendship again; she and her husband, a Jewish manufacturer [Henrik Salomonson] are very musical; it seems they hear little violin music so she was 'the talk of the town' after playing at their soirée. Is about to read Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac" and "La Samaritaine"; asks whether Bob knows and likes them.

Letter from Bramine Hubrecht to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence. - She and her husband have often thought and talked about Trevelyan since he left them, wondering what the future will hold; they 'must leave that to dear Bessie'. Things will be hard for them both now: Bessie will be in 'isolation' at home, as she will not be able to discuss this matter with Bramine's parents or sister unless she is 'absolutely clear in her own mind - it would be mental torture'. The 'terrible business of the [Second Boer] war' will also make an impression on her, feeling as she already does so strongly 'the wrench which marriage with a foreigner would be'. The worst thing about the war is 'the hypocracy [sic] with which all the English statesmen seem to be saturated', preparing for six months while giving the Boers the 'illusion' that an agreement could be made; and then there are speeches like that of Balfour and 'other so called honourable and religious gentleman'. Meanwhile, Harcourt 'protests, but will vote for the money [further military funding]! Is there then no generous mind left?' Are the English so much come down since Lord Chatham?'. In Chatham's day, however, the war was 'against men of the same race' rather than 'those stupid Boers, who live according to their antiquated notions derived from the old testament'; is 'bitter, very bitter, against the wicked Government', however much she likes Trevelyan, whom she calls 'my dear fellow'. As for Queen Victoria, 'one sees how, by being a sort of machine all one's life, one becomes one really at last'; wonders why she did not appeal to the nation; also criticises the other rules who sent ambassadors to the peace conference and 'do not move an inch to help against war', it is a sign of how low the 'moral standard' everywhere seems to be. In time the world will be 'one big Exchange' with no poetry, and nothing mattering but money and greed.

Returns to the letter after several days, now in Rome; meanwhile the British Parliament, apart for a few Irish representatives, have voted funds for the war; cannot understand the Whigs. She cannot sleep at night, and having 'loved the English so', nearly hates them now; cannot write to Bessie about Trevelyan, and in her place 'could never consent to give up my birthright of Dutchwoman, to become a subject of that wicked mecreant [sic] the prince of Wales', who 'sells his soul and that of his subjects for the gold of Africa' and will not even go out to fight himself. Has just received a letter from Bessie, which says Trevelyan is going to see her; prays that if he wins her love his influence may 'widen and deepen her love for all beings and things'. Feels 'very responsible in this matter', since it was she who brought them together, and Bessie is 'half sister, half child, exceedingly dear'. Would be 'dreadful if she became tainted by what seems... the national vice of the English = selfdeceiving egotism, overbearingness, hypocrisy' which they call 'commonsense'. Begs his pardon for speaking so openly, which she does as she knows he has 'width of mind enough to shake off all chauvinistic feeling'; perhaps he does not think the opposition should have refused the funds or resigned.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Received Bob's letter this morning, and nerved herself to tell her uncle and aunt about his intended arrival; her aunt 'understood at once' and made no difficulties, though said her uncle may make some; she then found her uncle writing to Bramine [Hubrecht] in his study and told him, he was amazed but wanted to 'grasp at once the whole situation' and told her he saw quite through her pretext and understood everything but she begged him not to speak further about it. So they are both quite cheerful about the subject, and are probably discussing it now she has gone to bed.

Writing on the next day, she says that things were not so cheerful that morning, and her uncle took up the subject of Bob's visit again after breakfast; will not go into detail, but he does tend to 'attach enormous importance to convention' and it is hard for him to take everything in. But he does not want to make things difficult, and will leave her 'quite free' when Bob is here; he would like Bob to pay a formal visit on his first afternoon in the Hague, when the pretext for Bob's stay, 'poor old Vondel', must be mentioned; Bob will then be able to come the following morning and probably regularly to do some work. In the afternoon when the weather is fine she has to walk with her aunt, who she thinks would like Bob to join them. Thought he might stay a fortnight; if it suits him to go on early to Italy of course he must, though asks if he is sure about meeting the Frys in Siena, as she thought they were going there before Florence, which is why the G[randmont]s did not meet them and why her cousin Marie [Hubrecht] has gone first to Lugano and Milan. Is sorry to hear Bob finds it hard to settle to work. Discusses further her objection to Bob's translation of a French phrase [from Ronsard]; thanks him for his 'little grammar lesson about "shall" and "will"'.

The latest news of the [Second Boer] war must be 'very distressing' to the English; asks if Bob still feels it would be good if the English were 'well beaten'. Of course thought of the war itself is 'an intense horror'. Asks if Bob knows anyone fighting; they have heard of some 'striking losses', such as the death of a 'very beloved nephew' of their friend Dr Koster [Tuimen Hendrik Blom Coster?]. The feeling against Britain is very strong in the Netherlands; 'flags were put up in many streets when the news of Ladysmith reached' them; wonders if Bob will mind that when he comes. Suggested the 12th as the day he should come since he had mentioned a [rugby?] football game the day before; would not deprive him the chance of 'displaying [his] chief if not only vanity' and hopes he will enjoy himself. and not come over 'with a blue eye & some fractured bones'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Will leave on the 12th, arriving some time in the morning of the 13th; will go on to Italy afterwards; his friend [Desmond] MacCarthy may join him at the Hague around the end of November and travel with him. Bessie seems to have been 'successful and tactful' and he will try to be as well. Intends to make their Vondel 'pretext a real one'; wants her to translate some of the plays besides "Lucifer", so that he is reading good plays (useful since he is trying to write them himself) and 'laying the foundations' for an attempt to learn Dutch; will get a grammar and dictionary, and asks her to get him a cheap edition of Vondel. Asks if there is anything she would like to learn in recompense, such as Latin grammar. Asks what the 'examination [he] may have to sustain' from her uncle is likely to cover: he can give reasons for wanting to study Vondel,. Discussion of hotels. Appreciates her aunt's 'rapier thrust of irony'; will certainly accompany them on walks whenever Bessie wishes. Asks if she would like him to bring her any books. Discussion of the war: still thinks it is a 'great mistake' on the part of the British, though doubts whether it would be good 'for themselves or for any one else' if the Boers were to win, which he does not think at all likely. Is angry with the Government and the country, but does not think it right to accuse the 'nation as a whole of wickedness and hypocrisy' as is being done on the continent; thinks the Boers were not giving British subjects a 'proper government or the proper securities for justice'; negotiations were not carried out properly, but does not think most of the country, or the Government (except for Chamberlain) actually want or wanted war. Thinks Bessie is probably right about the translation of 'du vulgaire' [in Ronsard's poem]. Bessie must not think that she is keeping him from work; expects to do little until he goes to Italy 'refreshed and invigorated' after seeing her. Thinks the Frys have changed their plans, but hopes to see them in Italy for a few days wherever they are.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's letter 'was a great surprise': it became his duty to consult his parents before proposing marriage when he chose 'not to adopt a profession by which [he] would contribute to [his] own support'. He and Caroline are prepared to double his present allowance to eight hundred pounds a year when he marries Miss Van der Hoeven, and will settle an insurance on his wife and children with the Equitable Mutual Society with no annual premium to pay. Tells Robert to write when he has shown this letter to Hubrecht [Paul François Hubrecht, Elizabeth's uncle].

Draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Accepts that the blame 'implied' in his father's letter [12/31] was 'well-deserved': he should have consulted his parents before asking anyone to marry him; it was no excuse that he was unsure of the answer he would receive to his proposal [to Elizabeth van der Hoeven]. Thinks the proposed allowance is generous, also that Mr Hubrecht agrees, but he is writing to Sir George himself to 'make the situation simpler clearer'; he said much the same about Robert's not speaking to his parents first as Sir George had.

Letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht] has read Sir George's letter to Robert, and she feels it her duty to write to Caroline to thank her for the kindness she has shown towards them; understands that in some ways Robert has acted wrongly [in not asking his parents before proposing marriage to her] but she has acted 'rather in the same way' so should say little. Describes something of how they grew closer to each other during Robert's two-week stay at Ede, her uncertainty at the end of the visit when he 'wanted to settle things more definitely, and her final decision. Robert has often spoken about Caroline, which gives her the courage to write 'so boldly and intimately'; asks her to forgive her this time.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to receive Elizabeth's letter; the Trevelyans are 'quite ready to forgive [her] and Robert for the little want of confidence'; tells her to ask 'quite frankly' about anything she thinks Caroline can help with. Wants to feel her 'a daughter in reality and not in name only'; she and her husband will welcome Elizabeth into the family; thinks she will find them 'very quiet people, easy to live with'. Hopes it will not be long before they meet. Glad Elizabeth is 'such a good English scholar' as Caroline knows no Dutch and has forgotten all the German she once knew. Is sure she will take an interest in Robert's work; he has seemed 'so lonely in his Surrey lodging'. Has not seen the house he has taken, but thinks it must be pretty. Glad Elizabeth took her time to decide on marriage. Sends regards to her aunt and uncle; looks forward to meeting them.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - He and his wife appreciate the feelings Hubrecht and his wife have about the future of Miss [Elizabeth] van der Hoeven, who has written to his wife. Hopes and believes that the marriage will make both young people happy, and will reward the Hubrechts for their 'kindness and affection towards [their] niece'. Looks forward to meeting them. Has himself five times been to the Netherlands as a tourist, visited the scene of William [the Silent?]'s death at Delft, and 'read the whole of [John] Motley's "Dutch Republic' on Dutch soil'. Glad that the proposals satisfy Hubrecht; brings up the point of what Robert's position would be after his and Caroline's death, when he will be 'independent and at ease'; suggests that as well as the settlement on Robert's wife and children already discussed, he and Caroline should covenant to pay him personally eight hundred pounds a year until then. Regarding the settlement itself, expects Hubrecht knows what an 'exceptional institution... the Equitable Mutual is" Would be glad to know what Miss van der Hoeven's 'personal circumstances' are. Asks in a postscript if the Hubrechts consider the marriage 'sufficiently fixed' to make it known; on their side it is so.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Hotel de la Poste, Bruxelles - Does not know how to thank her for her 'extraordinarily kind letter' which arrived yesterday. She will have seen his last letter to his father, acknowledging that he did wrong in not consulting them before proposing [to Elizabeth]; thinks though that everything will be for the best. Is here for two days, as he and Elizabeth's uncle agreed it would be good for him to go away for a little while after 'this last somewhat eventful and in some ways anxious week'; will return to the Hague on Thursday, and there is plenty to see. Thinks Elizabeth's uncle sanctions the engagement; unlikely the wedding could take place before the summer, as Elizabeth wants to spend more time with the Hubrechts; she also wants the Grandmonts to be there, and they do not generally return from Sicily till May or June. Expects he will soon go on to Italy. Will send a photo of Elizabeth when he returns to the Hague; his mother 'must not expect a beauty', though he finds her looks 'anything but disagreeable'. Thinks she will be able to 'look after [him] properly' as she is 'prudent and orderly, and in many ways thoroughly Dutch'; glad that her intellect is 'neither particularly poetical, nor romantic' and she has 'quite enough imagination and insight to understand anything' he might want; she has good taste for art, literature, and other things 'for a woman', and tends to be 'reflective and critical, rather than positive or creative'; she is of course 'a Protestant, at least not a Catholic'. Thinks he wrote that she knows the Nicholsons, 'by which I meant the Donaldsons of St Andrews' [James Donaldson and family?]. Has told no-one apart from the Frys [Roger and Helen] about his engagement, and will not do so until everything is settled between his father and Mr Hubrecht.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel de la Poste, Bruxelles. - Is writing between courses at lunch after a morning at the gallery; may go to the Palais Arenburg to see the pictures, and perhaps to the Wiertz [Museum]. If the weather is fine tomorrow, may go to Waterloo and be 'as patriotic and Brittish [sic] and military' as he likes. Finds Brussels to be a nice town with much to see and much going on, so he is 'nearly compensated' for their separation; fewer 'really good pictures' than he remembered, but the Metzys was 'magnificent', as were several other Flemish paintings. Went last night to see Massenet's "Cendrillon", but was not impressed and left before the end. Will try a play tonight, then tomorrow thinks he will attend a Beethoven recital by [Frederic] Lamond; saw him as a boy but has forgotten all about him. Has not yet handed in the parcel and note from her uncle, but will do. Plans to return on Thursday. Has written to his mother 'telling her some more home-truths' about Bessie; must send her the photo when he gets back. Dreamed of Bessie last night; cannot remember details, but was glad to do so on their first separation since they 'loved one another openly'. Wishes it was possible to 'kiss at a distance', as the telephone allows one to speak at a distance; writes a poem over the part of the paper he has kissed which urges her to kiss it in her turn.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's letter [final version 46/75] was all he could wish; wishes him great joy in his marriage, Miss van der Hoeven has written 'very sweetly' to Caroline and they are eager to meet and welcome her to the family. Acknowledges the business point which Mr Hubrecht raises, and has resolved it in his letter by agreeing to covenant to pay Robert eight hundred pounds a year 'unless and until' he comes into a capital which will bring him that income; has asked Hubrecht to tell him Miss van der Hoeven's financial position, but whatever this is, 'the marriage is a settled thing'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - He and his wife are quite satisfied with what Hubrecht proposes: understands that Elizabeth will manage her own property and pay 'three hundred pounds annually to sustaining the household'. Enclosing a 'rough, but substantially accurate, description of the Equitable [Mutual Insurance Society]' in his own hand, outlining the way it functions and the favourable opinion held of it by Sir Robert Hamilton 'the ablest English public servant of our day'; says he has insured all three of hims sons, and himself, for ten thousand pounds each, paying Robert's premium as a lump sum in 1882; has written to the Actuary for a printed account which he will send on. Will now inform their relatives of the forthcoming marriage.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Is writing to the relations and friends his mother mentions, and to some others; cannot therefore write for long to her, as he has to participate in some formal calls by Bessies's friends and relations this afternoon. Encloses the photograph of Bessie, which is not a good one but the best they have at the moment. All is well, which owes much to her and his father's 'extreme kindness'. Must leave for Milan next Thursday to catch the Frys [Roger and Helen] there. Kind suggestion that Bessie should visit England in the Spring; wonders if his parents will be in London or Welcombe around March, or she could come to Wallington; her uncle and aunt would certainly not object. His mother said he might find her advice 'a bore'; in fact he thought it 'very good', and will try to keep to it. Asks if she could send photographs of herself and his father to the Hubrechts; they will send theirs soon. Paid a visit to Amsterdam yesterday and saw Bessie's sister Mrs Röntgen, who is 'much pleased' with the engagement; they are very nice and he expects his mother will meet them at some point. Sends thanks to his father for his letter in a postscript; will reply soon; Bessie liked his mother's to her very much. Postscript in pencil adds that the photograph of Bessie is not good enough so they will not send it, she may perhaps get a new one done.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Originally enclosing, as promised, details on the Equitable [and Mutual Insurance Society] with annotations by himself to indicate the value of the insurance now and by the time Robert is forty-four or -five 'if things go well'; tells Hubrecht where to find information about the size of the Reserve Fund.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Has received her letter this morning, and sent a telegraph to say he has already written to all [the friends and relations] she names, as well as to a few others, such as Mrs [Mary] Booth, since she had invited him to Gracedieu for New Year's Day. Wrote to [Charles] Sanger first, as he lives with him, who got the letter at Cambridge and told George there; had however written to George, and Charles, next day. Has also written to his aunts and Booa [Mary Prestwich]. Has been busy: Mr Hubrecht sent him to visit Bessie's sister Mrs Röntgen in Amsterdam on Saturday, on Sunday he received callers with the family, and on Monday he went to Ede with her and her sister-in-law [strictly, Elizabeth had no sister-in-law: Bramine Hubrecht meant?] to see about the furniture moving. Thinks his mother will have seen his and Hubrecht's letters to his father; hopes that 'little difficulty' is now resolved. Elizabeth is about five foot ten, has 'brownish yellow hair, of rather a light tint', and eyes of he thinks 'greenish grey'. Has not yet written her any poems, but 'must try in Italy'. Will try to get her a ring in Milan; [Roger] Fry may be able to help; leaves tomorrow afternoon, and will spend a few days there as he has much to discuss with Fry. Not sure when he will return: depends how his work goes. Hopes a visit by Bessie to England in the spring can be arranged.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry that Hubrecht has been disturbed by a misunderstanding; reminds him that he was not sure in his own letter [13/41] of the 'word in question' in Hubrecht's letter; he and Lady Trevelyan now understand that Elizabeth wil contribute one [not three] hundred pounds a year to household expenses, and will have the rest of her income at her own disposal. Would like to know whether her capital will be settled on her children. Robert was much pleased by his introduction to Elizabeth's friends and relations.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Hubrecht for his explanation of Dutch inheritance law, which is 'very just in principle'; has often wished there were a similar one in England. Has heard from Robert in Milan, who seems very happy. They look forward to a visit from Elizabeth whenever is convenient for her. Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] is his cousin; sure he will be much interested; will be necessary to 'make all safe on the side of English law'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso Amalfi. - Corrects Bessie's Italian for his address. Details of post times. The weather continues to be bad so he has been reading, writing letters, and finishing copying out [Thomas Sturge Moore's] "Danaë". Thanks her for sending on the "Chronicle". Has written for the "Manchester Guardian", as he agrees with it about the [Second Boer] War; its editor [C.P.] Scott was here when he arrived, and he had a long talk with him about the war. The "Guardian" is 'almost the best paper in England, being cosmopolitan'; is encouraged that Scott says he has 'kept most of his public, in spite of his attitude to the war', and that opposition to their policy led to the resignation of the "Chronicle's" editors, rather than public opinion. Hopes Bessie's visit to the dentist went well. Discussion of the lack of interest in romantic love in Sophocles and its treatment by the other ancient tragedians; contrasts this with the way 'almost all the great modern dramatis, Shakespear [sic], Racine, Molière, de Vega etc. fetch their subjects from Venus' archives'. Continues the letter later, after 'scribbling off a severe commentary on some of the obscurities in Moore's "Danaë"' and reading the first chapters of [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant", which Mrs Reid lent him this afternoon. Has told her about Bessie and she took a great interest; she is 'a dear old lady, and very kind' to him. Improvises a poem about being a black beetle crawling under Bessie's door to give her kisses.

Returns to the letter next evening; has been outside most of the day, spending the morning in Mrs Reid's garden, though not really able to work, and walking in the afternoon. Hopes to start work in a day or two on another play, not the one he showed Bessie. Has begun his commentary on Moore's "Danaë," but it will take him hours. Tells her to show the photographs his mother sent her to her uncle and aunt. Is touched by what she says about trusting him. Hopes that [Ambrose Hubrecht's] whale 'has been successfully dissected'; disappointed to hear 'he is not going to Utrecht whole, to be stuffed, or bottled.'

Continues the letter next day. Has been reading Chaucer and 'commenting on Danaë's little faults'. Perhaps exaggerated when he said 'modern art scarcely seemed to exist at all', but does feel that modern art is 'on the wrong lines', though 'men like Degas and Puvis de Chavannes and Whistler, and even often Watts and Burne Jones, have done great things'. Would be wrong to persuade himself that bad art was good, and there are times when 'circumstances have made great art difficult or impossible', such as literature in the middle ages. Does not think the Frys' attitude to art is exclusive; they may well be in music, but they know less about that.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Bob's first letter from Ravello arrived yesterday; it arrived just as she was going to the dentist and gave her strength to stand all the treatment; at the end she 'nearly hugged the doctor'. Bob's quotation from Chaucer is 'charming'; hopes he will never need complain of his 'wyve's cussedness'. She got the proofs for her photos yesterday and is quite pleased with them: 'the one without the eye glasses is almost pretty'; will send them to Bob's mother and Bob himself. Writes on the 14th to say that she went to hear a rehearsal the day before 'more worth than last time'; heard an ouverture by Chabrier, 'an empty French piece of music', then Beethoven's second symphony to her 'great delight'. Then she heard Bob's 'friend [Frederic?] Lamond' play the Tchaikowsky piano concerto, and admired his playing but did not care much for the piece. Was sitting with a Russian lady, Madame de Rhemen, who is married to a Dutch Baron and 'a great swell... and a would-be patroniser and enthusiast for musical life at the Hague', 'very clever & intellectual.... though narrow-minded and hard in her opinions'. She 'fascinated Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] at one time' until 'the tables were turned' and Tuttie became rather tired of her, and 'taken up with her American friend [Maud Howard]', it was 'such a comedy'; now Bessie thinks the feelings on both sides have 'fallen rather flat'. Her husband is 'a dry stolid old Dutchman', and the marriage not happy. Had not seen her since the summer; she wanted to hear all about Bob; is going to dine with her on Saturday then go to a music recital. Another old Russian lady, the Comtesse de Bylandt, came to sit with them; told Bessie she had lived twenty years in England, knows Bob's parents, and knew his grandfather very well. Returned home and took down some 'dull' dictation for her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]. [Her brother-in-law Julius Engelbert] Röntgen writes that the family are all pleased with their new sister, except Johannes 'who began to howl when the baby was shown to him'. Is very cross that a letter from her sister [Abrahamina] inviting her to come to hear a chamber concert on Saturday only reached her yesterday; she could have played to [Bram] Eldering and got some preliminary advice, as he is too busy to start her lessons before January.

Gredel Guye is coming again on Friday, as her oral examination is on Saturday; remembers the day of her last visit, which was when Bob had his interview with her uncle. Had a strange dream last night in which 'some curious law' forced her to marry someone else, she thinks Mr Eldering, and woke with great relief. Got Bob's father's "Life of Macauley" from the library recently (they only have that, his "American Revolution", and Bob's brother George's book ["England in the Age of Wycliffe, 1368–1520"]. Macauley's life looks 'very interesting'; has glanced through and seen a letter of his to his sister Margaret about his other sister [Hannah]'s marriage to Bob's grandfather, speaking very highly of him. Agrees that she must read [Theodor] Mommsen, as Bob said at Taormina, to see whether he can inspire with 'the true love of history' she has never possessed. Happy thoughts about her feelings for Bob and their marriage. Now going to stay with her cousin Louise Hubrecht again at Leiden; is taking her [Bob's] "Mallow and Asphodel" as she asked to see it.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - Has been out most of the day since there was some sunshine, and has written a few lines. Seems that old [Pasquale] Palumbo is 'in great danger'; has offered to move to another hotel for a week or two, but Pasquale's wife will not hear of it; she 'takes a sort of mother's care of him' and says the rooms of the Albergo Toro will be damp. Will stay for a while, but does not think he should stay if Palumbo gets worse; only Italians go to the Toro but sure he would be all right there. Has just received Stephen Philips' play about Paolo and Francesca; cannot see as much in it as 'many very clever people do'; it has 'effective theatrical scenes' and 'some rather fine poetry', and if it succeeds when acted next year it will make things easier for [Thomas Sturge] Moore and [Laurence] Binyon, and for himself, if he manages to finish a verse play, but it is still a bad play. Recommends that she read "Romeo and Juliet" and the "Merchant of Venice" if she has not already; thinks he should charge her a fee in kisses for giving her literary advice. Finishes writing for the day with a doggerel verse recommending that she wear socks in bed to keep warm.

Returns to the letter the following evening; glad she got on so well with the dentist, and 'recognises her portrait' in [Chaucer's] Merchant's Wyve. Hopes she will send her photograph soon. Found her account of 'the Russian ladies [Madame de Rhemen and Countess van Bylandt] and Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht; see 9/17]' very entertaining. Does not remember the Comtesse de Bylandt, but will ask his parents about her. Teases her for dreaming that she was married to [Bram] Eldering. Palumbo seems better today. Weather fine today, and he has got on well with his play; 'cannot get along in the rain'. Also thought of a new poem on Elijah in the desert, but might not write it now. Hopes to get over a month of work done, and not to return before the end of January; his mother has just written that she would like Bessie to stay with them at Welcombe early in February; thinks that would be the best plan, so he would probably not spend more than a few days in Holland on the way back; does not know whether it would be considered right to travel back together so she should ask her uncle and aunt.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, s'Gravenhage; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso d'Amalfi, Italia. - 'Poor Gredel [Guye]' has failed; she is 'downcast', but 'very sensible' knowing it is a very hard exam and she can try next year. She and her family seem to like Bob very much. Is not sure about Bob's correction of her Italian. Notes that her letters reach him quicker than his get to her; discusses love letters; often wishes she could find new ways of expressing her love; would be good if Bob learnt Dutch so that she could write to him in it. Asks if he knows he sometime leaves out words, about two or three a page; when he wrote 'sea-sickness would prevent [him] from coming to see [her]', meaning the contrary, she thought she would have to give him up. Glad that Ravello has inspired Bob's 'poetic vein', as she sees in his letter. Unsure why Bob is surprised she showed his mother's photographs to her uncle and aunt, especially as he knows how everything which enters the house 'is enquired after'. Spent a very happy afternoon at Leiden on Thursday, seeing her cousin Louise [Hubrecht]; wants Bob to meet her as she is so nice; told her lots about him and left his poems ["Mallow and Asphodel"]. Went skating yesterday on the ponds in the wood, for the first time this year; wonders if Bob skates and imagines skating together. Went to see the 'poor man at the Hospital' [see 9/]13 again this afternoon, and got to know him much better; he told her that there was a man in the same ward who had earned his living 'travelling round the country with a crocodile, which he had left behind at his inn now' earning about 8 guilders, almost fourteen shillings, a week. If the weather is good tomorrow, will go to Amsterdam to see her niece Amanda Röntgen and congratulate her parents; now she is going to read [Sir George Otto Trevelyan's] 'Life of Macauley'; will also re-read [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant" so as to be reading it at the same time as Bob and able to discuss it with him.

Continues the letter next morning; has put off her visit to Amsterdam, probably till Tuesday. Ambro [Hubrecht] stayed the night after 'looking after his smelly whale [see 9/14] again'; they have produced much 'precious oil' from it, though it has been hard getting kettles big enough to hold the bones; he was 'very lively' and has sent Bob a bound copy of his American speech. Discusses [General Sir Redvers Henry] Buller's defeat at Colenso, and asks if it might effect a change in public opinion. Asks whether he likes the "Manchester Guardian", and whether it reaches him quickly. Asks if he has heard from [Lina] Duff Gordon or his 'Florence friends' [the Berensons?]. She has had a 'very nice letter' from Mrs Hartmann, the Danish lady, also from Miss Dahlrup who sends kindest regards. Looks forward very much to returning to Sicily together. Has also hear from Mrs van Riemdyk about Tonina's violin; they would never sell it but would loan it to Bessie, which is 'quite unlawful'. so Bessie has replied to say she is not interested and Bob's 'sweet, kind & generous gift... must come to nothing'. Has been reading an argument between the Brownings about duelling, which she discusses, as well as the possibility of Bob losing his temper with her and vice versa; calls herself 'a hasty-tempered vixen'. Finishes off the letter next morning; likes the poetry Bob has copied out for her, especially Blake's; the beginning of his letter is 'very naughty indeed', and he will get his 'whipping one day - women's whips are their tongues'; quotes a Dutch proverb translated into English. Hopes his host is better, and that the storms have passed.

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