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Hoeven, Maria Pruys van der (1824-1901) wife of Paul François Hubrecht
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Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - They have not yet retired to their 'Retraite Edéniencee [ie, at Ede]', as her cousin calls it; does not think they will go before early June. The Grandmonts are still where she left them at Rocca Bella [Taormina, Sicily] at the end of April; they are travelling back with an English friend, stopping only briefly at Florence and Bâle. Was sorry to leave Italy 'like that' but it could not be helped; made her all the more anxious to return another time. Wrote to her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht] and sent her Trevelyan's messages, but does not know whether she will go to England this summer; he does not seem anxious to go and she supposes 'the husband's opinion has great weight in these matters!'. She herself will not be able to; is currently here alone at home with her uncle and aunt [Paul François Hubrecht and his wife Maria] and would not like to leave them when she would have to go 'to fit in with Senior's week at St. Andrews'. Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and the trouble he took with the list of books, though she has not yet got all those he suggested, in part because the library is currently closed. Fortunately the director is a friend of the family and can be persuaded to break the rule forbidding books to be taken or sent into the country, so they sometimes get a good selection sent to Ede; however spring-cleaning is 'a holy business' in this country so she must wait. Asks if Trevelyan could possibly send some of the books he listed: something by Henry James; his father's book; [Robert] Browning's letters; she will get [William?] Morris's "Life" [by J. W. MacKail and his brother's book from the library. Has been reading [Elizabeth Barrett Browning's] "Aurora Leigh" for the first time; asks whether Trevelyan likes it. Will be curious to see Trevelyan's friend [Thomas Sturge Moore]'s poems which he sent to her cousin; wonders whether they will appreciate it; does not think Mrs Grandmont has 'specially classical tastes'. Would be very nice if Trevelyan could come to Ede this summer; unsure still of when exactly would be the best time as she knows nothing of the Grandmonts' plans; thinks probably late August or early September. Is longing to get to fresh air in the country; town seems oppressive after Taormina.

They all feel 'greatly honoured... with all these noble peace delegates' being at the Hague; the Congress was opened yesterday; one of the Dutch members told them 'what a feeble old president Baron de Staal seemed to be' and that 'the first meeting did not promise much'. Is sending some Taormina photographs; the one with Mrs C [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan?] is 'funny but too indistinct'; [Giuseppe] Bruno took the same view which better shows Mrs C. 'like some curious prehistoric Juliet on her balcony'; she has it and will show it to you, or Trevelyan could write to Bruno and ask to see the several pictures he took in her garden of her 'constructions'. Glad Trevelyan has heard some good music in London; she feels out of practice and is looking forward to playing with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] again. Knows her aunt is giving her the biography of Joachim by Moser for her birthday. Will also have to 'make special Vondel studies this summer'; feels she knows very little about him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Is very sorry she did not know in time to tell Bob the concert last Monday was cancelled; it was not [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen but [Johannes] Messchaert who was ill; he still cannot sing so the second concert will also be put off. Very sad as they would have had a good audience, and he will have to pay the costs. Has received Bob's poems and enjoyed reading them on the way to Almelo last Monday; likes part of 'the Indian poem' very much, though it is rather vague; the 'fairy poem' is charming and she wishes she had the power to set it to music; questions his choice of interpretation in the line of his Ronsard translation.

Is very glad Bob will come to The Hague; he is right that she would not like him to come without her family knowing; she is not under such 'romantically difficult' circumstances to make that necessary and what she said about their 'suspicions' probably made a stronger impression than she intended. Bramine [Hubrecht] even encouraged her to tell them about it; it would not be 'so unwise', since she is 'in reality quite free and independent', and if she could tell her aunt and be sure she would discuss it with her uncle, she might; however, thinks she would not feel real freedom when Bob was here if they knew what had happened. She will therefore tell her aunt that Bob intends to come over and do some translation work with her, asking her aunt to trust her and help 'conquer any objections' her uncle may have though she thinks he will agree at once. Marie [Hubrecht] and her American friend Maud [Howard] leave either next Monday or Tuesday, Marie for Florence and Maud for America via Paris; all three servants are then leaving in the first week of November so the household will be unsettled, and her aunt is suffering from a bad cold, so she will write as soon as all is well. Asks if he would prefer a first-rate hotel or a moderate one.

On the whole, had a good time at Almelo though it was strange to spend so much time with her friend [Adriana Salomonson Asser] after so long but they struck up quite a friendship again; she and her husband, a Jewish manufacturer [Henrik Salomonson] are very musical; it seems they hear little violin music so she was 'the talk of the town' after playing at their soirée. Is about to read Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac" and "La Samaritaine"; asks whether Bob knows and likes them.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Apologises if his letter writing has fallen off; has been more absorbed in his work recently. Has received her New Year's letter; a delight to know she loves him so much; discusses separation and distance. The Straughn Davidsons came today, 'two brothers and the wife of one' [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson and either of George or William, his brothers?]; they are nice people, though they do break up his 'pleasant solitude'. Has not got on well with his writing recently; thinks he is stale and should take the day off tomorrow to read novels. Is going to bed now to read Stephenson's letters, which Davidson has lent him.

Returns to the letter next morning with a description of last night's dreams, one about eating a breakfast of 'the staple diet of trout in a pond', and another about kissing an unknown young lady. Some of Stevenson's letters are well worth reading; thinks he was 'a pleasant fellow with a real streak of genius', though does not join in the 'prevalent R.L.S. worship'. Asks if she knows "Treasure Island", "[The Master of] Ballantrae" and his short stories. If the forecast is correct and they are due 'some dirty weather', the Strachan-Davidsons will be an 'acquisition'. Has skipped on to the second act of his play, and is 'plugging away at the faithful wife'; the difficulty is the villain, who is 'a plausible gentlemanly kind'. Encloses a dried beetle which he found 'in that state' on his cliff; sends it in response to her almond, and has placed 'not a few kisses on his back'. Very sorry her aunt is so unwell. Glad Willy v[an] R[iemsdijk] is not going [to the Second Boer War]; does not know what is going to happen. Sorry that she is to have so little time with [Bram] Eldering; hopes she will be able to go on her return from England. Returns to the letter after 'midday tea'; has not yet heard from [Bernard] Berenson but thinks he will pay him a visit of a couple of days if he wishes. Has finished [Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant", which he now does not think is a real success; looks forward to being able to discuss such things with her in their own house. Quotes a music hall song of Eugene Stratton about love. Is not a natural letter-writer; she is much better than he is.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Apologises for not writing more often. Is very sorry that her aunt has been so unwell; hopes the anxious time has now passed; can quite understand how her uncle might 'develop infinite degrees of fussiness' under the strain and thus be 'the direct opposite of [Alphonse] Grandmont' as he is in many other ways. Hopes Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] also recovers quickly. His aunt Annie [Anna Maria Philips] is a 'dear creature', but always complains he does not write to or visit her enough; he also likes her 'invalid friend [Sophie Wicksteed]... to whom she has devoted herself'. His letter [about the landslide which damaged the Hotel Cappuccini at Amalfi] appeared in the "[Manchester] Guardian" on 2 January; it has pleased the locals as it says the coast is quite safe; thinks he will 'take to journalism', which is much easier than writing verse plays'. However, he has got on well this afternoon; is 'making no end of the wife, who is no end of a heroine'; teases Bessie by saying she will not get the chance to be such a faithful wife, as he will keep a closer eye on her. Copies out 'an old fellow who wrote about you in the 17th century' [Richard Crashaw, "Wishes to his (Supposed) Mistress"].

Continues the letter next morning; has breakfasted and 'pumped [his] ideas on Latin poetry into bucket Straughn Davidson [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson?] for half an hour'. Finishes copying out the Crashaw poem; thinks it influenced Browning. Glad Bessie has heard some music. Is 'very fond of Rameau', and has 'often heard Dolmetsch play him'. They must find out where Gluck is being played and go there; he 'can't wait much longer without hearing the Iphigenia and the other great ones'; though she might think him a Wagnerian. Hopes she will hear Lamond again. Finishes the letter in early afternoon. It is cold and stormy, and he will go to 'a nook under the cliff' to work. Discusses the rumours that there are letters incriminating [Joseph] Chamberlain [in the Jameson Raid?]; the 'Parnell letters and the Henry forgeries [in the Dreyfus case]' are warnings to be careful about such things, though if genuine they should be published; if this leads to a 'basis for peace so much the better'. Hopes Bessie's housekeeping is not tiring her; he will not be 'exacting' when they are married, 'especially with Mrs Enticknap to do everything' for her

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Has been 'out composing verses in a tempest'. Glad she is having happy dreams; suggests analyses for her one about the cicalas [9/26]. Quotes from Moore on sleep [Thomas Sturge Moore, "To An Early Spring Day"]. Sorry that her aunt's recovery is not speedier. Will send a letter to her tomorrow. Does not like Mrs Costelloe 'in many ways', but does not condemn her for 'refusing to live with Costelloe' who seems to have been 'almost impossible to live with', though she should not have been 'taken in' by him; thinks her and [Bernard] Berenson's relationship is 'as nice as those sort of relations can be'; discusses her influence on him. Supposes he will see Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon] at Florence; explains the nature of their friendship further. He and Lina are on 'very good terms' again, and she likes his poem about her pet bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though it is not yet finished.

Continues the letter next day; has read most of the editor's letter in the paper sent by Bessie's uncle [in a Dutch paper, to the Duke of Devonshire, see 9/26]; thinks he is 'in the main right' but knows 'little of the facts, except what he has gathered from English writers who disapprove of the [Second Boer] war' such as Bryce, Hobson, Lecky and Courtney; since he has 'ornamented his columns with many not very apt quotations' Bob as a poet ought not to be too hard on him. Thinks he will spend two days with Berenson at Florence, since it is unlikely Mrs Costelloe will be back; has not yet heard from his mother about crossing with Bessie and the letter may not have reached her. Asks him his plans suit Bessie. Is torn between Venus and Apollo, and 'Apollo has all the nine young ladies [the Muses] on his side'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Gives [Bernard] Berenson's address at Florence. Has been 'a bit stuck' with his play; but may write a little more before he leaves; may have to read more books on 'mediaeval manners, especially at meals, on minstrels and hunting'. Hopes that her aunt is better. Draws a sketch of his 'little Bessie tree'. Is reading a book on the evil eye, seems 'we live in a damned superstition planet'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Very sorry to hear her aunt is no better; wishes her uncle would get a nurse; agrees that Bessie should not go to England yet and will therefore stay longer in Ravello; if her aunt is no better by the time he reaches the Hague he will stay only a few days and could come back later.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Sets out his revised plans due to Bessie's aunt's continued illness again; 'very sad for her to be ill during the last few months [Bessie] will be with her', though the marriage could be put off if necessary. Even if the physical side of his feelings for her were not there, believes he would want to have her as a constant companion, which he cannot say even for 'his dearest friends such as Sanger and Fry and [Thomas Sturge] Moore'. Perhaps he should not separate these two aspects of his feelings; consideration of the way her personality seems to be 'always changing' slightly. Cuts off these 'lover's speculations', saying he should return to Mr Mudge [?]. Thinks that Mrs [Mary] Costelloe will not be back when he stays with [Bernard] Berenson, though he could not change his plans now, and does not want to have a breach with her. Has not done well with his play recently, but 'modified the plot somewhat' yesterday and thinks he will get on better now; will be able to read up on medieval manners and costumes on his return to England. Expects he will have to go to Welcombe even if Bessie does not come, and there is 'a fine French book on Medieval customs in the library'. Glad she was pleased by the beetle he sent her; likes 'little everything' as an endearment; knows the feeling that a dream is still real after waking. Hopes they have a nurse for her aunt now. Copies out his translation of the Swallow Song of Rhodes; it is not quite right yet and he needs a dictionary to check some of the words.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Gives [Bernard] Berenson's address at Florence; he is being 'very pressing and says he will be alone', so Bob will start on 24 or 25 January and can stay till he goes on to the Hague, probably at the end of the month but this will depend on Bessie's news. Hopes her aunt is better. May be able to do some work at Florence. Sends a 'late-blossoming plum' with his kisses.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Expects this is the last letter he will write her from Ravello; will start on the 24th, spend some of that day at Pompeii and take the evening express to Florence, arriving next day. Bessie's last account of her 'patient' [her aunt] was better; hopes she may be recovering by the time he reaches the Hague. Has been unlucky with the weather for the last two years but should not complain, as if the weather had not been bad last January he may not have accompanied his brother [George?] to Sicily and met Bessie. In the same way, if the Grandmonts had had a cook at the start of 1896, they would not have dined at the Timeo so he would never have met them and heard of her; he ought to 'like all cooks for that henceforth'. Bessie's quotation from Dante was 'very charming'; asks if she copied it out at Ede before 2 September or after. Encloses a 'little relic' he found in his waistcoat pocket, which he has kissed; she too should 'put the bits [of the railway ticket] together and kiss them' since they brought her and Bob together and made them kiss each other, though she did not kiss him till November, and he kissed her wrist 'a whole month and more before'. Did not sleep well last night as '"that horrible little dog" Gyp (as Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] would say' was barking; Madame [von Wartburg] has the dog safe in her room tonight.

Finishes the letter next day; the weather is lovely, and he almost regrets leaving, but will enjoy a few days in Florence and seeing [Bernard] Berenson; wants to see what he thinks of his last year's poems, and what he has done on this play. He usually likes Bob's work, but not always. Discussion of how no one person can be relied on to say whether something is good or bad. Hopes to see a few pictures at Florence, though does not mean to do much sightseeing. Sorry that Bessie had to miss Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture; thinks she is right that she should not come to England before her aunt is nearly well. Glad that her cousin [Louise Hubrecht] and the Röntgens liked his poems; Bessie is indeed a 'fine advertising agent'. Describes his breakfast here and in England.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Arrived safely yesterday, having had a 'delightful afternoon' at Pompeii on the way. Has found [Bernard] Berenson alone; Mrs C. [Mary Costelloe] will not return for a week or two; thinks that he and Berenson are 'making an effort not to squabble on matters of opinion, which is good discipline'. Hopes to hear from Bessie soon; will decide from what she says about her aunt's health how long to stay in Florence. Has not yet seen Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon]; thinks things between them are all right now as 'her letters were quite friendly' and she liked his poem about her pet bat ["The Lady's Bat"]. Is in more difficulty with Mrs Costelloe; must keep on good terms with her if he wants to stay friends with Berenson; mistrusts her gossip and the effect it might have had on Lina. Has not yet shown Berenson his last year's poems and the work on his new play; hopes he will be encouraging. Dined with the Rasponis last night, who are very nice and live opposite in 'a magnificent palace'. Thinks Tuscany 'the finest country in the world'. Had a good time at Ravello, especially towards the end; the Straughns [sic: Strachan-Davidsons?] were 'very good company', though some 'annoying strangers' turned up. Mrs Reid was 'very kind'; wants him and Bessie to come in August or September; he has said that is not for him to decide. Will let Bessie know when he is due to arrive, and make sure he does so in the day so she will not have to get up in the dark to meet him at the station; wonders who will see the other first, as they are both 'as blind as bats'. Will show her the poem about the bat when she comes; it is not 'first class' but 'pretty'. Hopes her aunt continues to get well; would be a great shame if Bessie could not come to England in time to go to Welcombe.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Has received two letters from her, one forwarded from 'Varello' [Ravello]. Thinks he will start back on Friday 2nd and reach the Hague on Saturday evening; if his train would get in too late, would arrive on Sunday morning instead. Thinks he may go to the Twee Staden hotel, as was not very comfortable at the Angleterre and it was not cheap. Having a good time in Florence, though he has not done any work. Maeterlinck's "La sagesse et la destinée" is 'surprisingly good', much better than "Le Trésor des humbles" . Dined at Mrs [Janet] Ross's last night; has only just recovered from the 'exceedingly good dinner'. Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon] 'very pleasant' and they are good friends again now; she was pleased with his bat ["The Lady's Bat"]. Had a 'little brush with Berenson about the war, as he is frantically cynical on such matters' but otherwise they have got on well. Berenson likes some of his work, but thinks his 'Indian poem dull' and is probably right'; Bob has not yet read him the play. Has to go down to Florence in the rain to lunch with people he doesn't much care for, but Berenson will probably show him some pictures afterwards. The myrtle [see the enclosure with 9/107] is indeed the 'tree of Venus'. Is glad her aunt is better, and hopes her recovery will continue; hopes Grandmont will not be long in bed ill. Is sending him some wine from Ravello, but fears it will not be good enough for 'his fastidious palate'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Received Bob's letter this morning, and nerved herself to tell her uncle and aunt about his intended arrival; her aunt 'understood at once' and made no difficulties, though said her uncle may make some; she then found her uncle writing to Bramine [Hubrecht] in his study and told him, he was amazed but wanted to 'grasp at once the whole situation' and told her he saw quite through her pretext and understood everything but she begged him not to speak further about it. So they are both quite cheerful about the subject, and are probably discussing it now she has gone to bed.

Writing on the next day, she says that things were not so cheerful that morning, and her uncle took up the subject of Bob's visit again after breakfast; will not go into detail, but he does tend to 'attach enormous importance to convention' and it is hard for him to take everything in. But he does not want to make things difficult, and will leave her 'quite free' when Bob is here; he would like Bob to pay a formal visit on his first afternoon in the Hague, when the pretext for Bob's stay, 'poor old Vondel', must be mentioned; Bob will then be able to come the following morning and probably regularly to do some work. In the afternoon when the weather is fine she has to walk with her aunt, who she thinks would like Bob to join them. Thought he might stay a fortnight; if it suits him to go on early to Italy of course he must, though asks if he is sure about meeting the Frys in Siena, as she thought they were going there before Florence, which is why the G[randmont]s did not meet them and why her cousin Marie [Hubrecht] has gone first to Lugano and Milan. Is sorry to hear Bob finds it hard to settle to work. Discusses further her objection to Bob's translation of a French phrase [from Ronsard]; thanks him for his 'little grammar lesson about "shall" and "will"'.

The latest news of the [Second Boer] war must be 'very distressing' to the English; asks if Bob still feels it would be good if the English were 'well beaten'. Of course thought of the war itself is 'an intense horror'. Asks if Bob knows anyone fighting; they have heard of some 'striking losses', such as the death of a 'very beloved nephew' of their friend Dr Koster [Tuimen Hendrik Blom Coster?]. The feeling against Britain is very strong in the Netherlands; 'flags were put up in many streets when the news of Ladysmith reached' them; wonders if Bob will mind that when he comes. Suggested the 12th as the day he should come since he had mentioned a [rugby?] football game the day before; would not deprive him the chance of 'displaying [his] chief if not only vanity' and hopes he will enjoy himself. and not come over 'with a blue eye & some fractured bones'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Does not think he can get to the Hague except around eleven at night because of the trains, so she is not bound to come and meet him. Can go straight to his hotel, probably the Angleterre as he cannot remember how to address the people at the Twee Steden, then come to see her early next day. Glad to hear good news of her aunt again. Knows a Miss Crommelin, 'half or whole Dutch', who lives with Isabel Fry; expects she is the same family [as Bessie's friend, see 9/31]; likes her 'well enough, though she is rather flagrantly "New womanly"'. Weather bad; is reading some interesting books; not inclined to work. Berenson has been telling him about old Italian and Russian books; has been reading Tolstoy's "Katia" ["Family Happiness"; hopes their marriage will turn out better; thinks it 'an interesting book, but rather unsatisfactory'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Asks if someone could book him a room at the Twee Steden, or the Angleterre if that is not possible; she need not come to meet him at the station since he will arrive so late. Berenson has given him a list of Russian books in translation to read. His mother says they should decide themselves whether he should accompany to England, and do as her uncle and aunt think right. Does hope she will be able to come on the 14th and spend some time at Welcombe. The Frys have got them a ring. Hopes her aunt is still better, as he could not bear not to see Bessie, will shave away the bristles from the journey so that they can pay each other some of their 'debt of K[isses]'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

British Museum. - Encloses Luzac's receipt, which she may give to her uncle. Spent yesterday afternoon at Highgate listening to [Thomas Sturge] Moore's new poetry, which was 'very refreshing'; Moore liked his bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though suggested some alterations; did not show him his play but hopes to do so soon. Has just seen [Laurence] Binyon has shown him a 'new ode of Tristram and Iseult' ["Tristram's End"] which is 'quite good but perhaps not first class'. Is taking Moore's play "Mariamne" to Dorking to read again and hopes to be 'in train' to do something himself. Will not order the beds until nearer the time he goes to Holland, but will talk to [Roger] Fry about the bedroom; she shall see and approve the colour before he distempers the walls. Tends to agree with her that they should economise on furnishing, to leave 'a good margin' for things such as foreign travel; he still also wants her to have a new violin. Is dining this evening with [Charles] Sanger, [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson and [Desmond] MacCarthy; Sanger is 'not at all well'; hopes his Greek journey will put him right. Copies out some lines from Binyon's Tristram poem. Very glad that Bessie's aunt was so much better on her return; wonders if the Luzacs have called; the Sickerts know a Hague painter called [Dirk] Jansen, whom they like but do not care much for his painting.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot [sic: Westcott], Dorking. - Is writing in the 'little room' he hopes will be hers; the fire burns well and it is warm and looks 'quite nice' now he has sent the Insley furniture to the spare room. Thinks he has thought of a way to improve his play and is happier about it now. Is reading Mériméee's "Les Cosaques D'Autrefois ", which is 'stunning'. Will write to the Insleys about their furniture; there is plenty of room for her books. Has not seen the Frys since Sunday; he [Roger Fry] understood about distempering the bedroom since they do not like the paper, though he probably thinks they are making a mistake. Has nearly finished "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]; discusses why he does not 'take to it altogether'. Encloses a letter from his Aunt Meg [Price]; he knows nothing about pianos so she should tell him what to say. Someone suggested by [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen might help them choose; does not know whether his aunt's 'professional friend' is to be trusted. One day they will have room for a big piano, but expects this would have to be an upright.

Finishes the letter next morning. Is sorry her aunt is not as much stronger as she first thought; hopes that the finer weather will help. Expects it is right for her to sell the land; she would know better than he where to put the money. Very glad her uncle and aunt think Whitsuntide will do [for the wedding]; someone like [Abraham?] Bredius would probably be best as the witness; her uncle once suggested the consul at Rotterdam, if he were Dutch. Doubts if any of his friends will come; thinks he will not ask. Was stupid to leave Luzac's bill in London; has asked it to be sent to him.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House. - Describes a dream in which he thought Bessie, 'his St Andrews friend' was in his bedroom. The servants have told him the butcher's wife says that the four 'single gentlemen' she has known who took this house were all married within a year; pretends to be scared of this prospect. Encloses Luzac's bill. His mother was also confused by his sonnet [printed in the "Speaker"], which he explains at length; refers in passing to Bessie's belief that 'cigarettes are really exceptionally detrimental to health'. Has done some work over the last couple of days, and is getting on quite well. Finishes the letter next morning. Is glad she is going to Eldering; hopes she likes his teaching. Thinks her and [her cousin] Louise's plan to send her aunt away to get well is good, but it will be difficult to persuade them. Mien [Rontgen's] present sounds 'delightful'; 'just like her' to take so much trouble. Mr Kattendijke's present sounds good as well. Expects the Vondel exhibition will not be open when he comes; jokes that things should have been arranged better.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Addresses Bob as 'Dearest'. Has been re-reading the Plato they read this morning and now understands it much more; wishes he were here to discuss it; seems very strange him not being here for dinner yet when he was here continually it seemed 'so unreal'. Hopes he will have a good time in Brussels. Has been out for a walk in the rain with her aunt, spent a 'tedious hour at the dressmaker'. Sets the letter aside for dinner, but returns to send Bob 'a most spiritual kiss', telling him to dream of her. Continues the letter the following day, saying she has forwarded a postcard to him, and looked for a 'suitable frame' for his portrait; the shopkeeper admired the portrait greatly, being 'particularly struck' by Bob's eyes. Has had her hair washed and it is now drying; soon 'the wonderful Lorelei' will sit on her rock (the little stool by the fire) and comb her hair, thinking of how just seven days ago she and Bob declared their love to each other. Teases him by saying that since he has gone to seek 'distractions in foreign countries... poor Loreley is left to pull out her hair in despair... [and] is approaching baldness'. Returns to finish the letter in the evening; asks if Bob has written to his mother or if he is waiting till he hears again. Her 'abilities as a housekeeper' would have impressed him if he had seen her folding the clean sheets with the new housemaid; this is one of the 'very few things' she can do in that line.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has had many letters to write this morning: to Sir Henry and Mr Turing; to Mrs Pepper at Seatoller to reserve rooms and ask if they will have the house to themselves; to Mr Insley to ask when he will collect his furniture; then to Irene Zocco who has just sent back the books he lent her. Teasingly wonders whether he should ask permission before writing to 'young foreign ladies'; will continue writing, and sending books 'as she is very few, and is too poor to get them, and yet is genuinely fond of reading'; he and Bessie must see them when they are next in Sicily. Finally wrote to his mother to thank her for the things she is sending; hopes the sofa will be comfortable. Very glad Bessie is meeting Joachim again. Does not at all think it will be necessary to invite the Howards [to the wedding]; would just like to speak to his mother first; takes the point that the invitations are sent by her uncle and aunt. Agrees that it would be good to be married totally privately, but she must not worry herself. Did not write any poetry yesterday, but had a 'fine time on the moor'. Agrees that she was 'a bold girl to ask [him] to come over and vondle' her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Was glad to get Bob's two letters and hear he had arrived safely at Milan. Forwarded some letters to Ravello on Sunday which Bob's mother had sent her, with 'a very kind note' [originally enclosed]; Bob is a 'naughty son' not to give her his Ravello address in time, and she will send it to her tomorrow. Thinks she would like Bob's mother to call her Elizabeth, as she asks; her English friends do, and then she will reserve 'Bessie' for 'more intimate purposes'. Also encloses a letter from [Alphonse] Grandmont which might entertain him, as might 'the bad poem in the beginning'. Is glad Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is being so helpful; shows he 'has regained his common sense' after quarrelling with Mademoiselle Thomley and getting 'away from under her influence', now he is 'much with the Dahlerups'. Hopes this letter will greet Bob on his arrival at Ravello, and that he enjoys 'all the good, beautiful things of life' there and gets some good work done. Asks if he remembered to give his letter to Mrs [Helen] Fry, and to buy himself some 'foreign paper' and a razor strop. If not she will have to think of him as 'a shaggy Robinson Crusoe-like poet' writing 'poems and love-letters on odd ends of paper... used by the peasants to wrap up their fruit'; has been enjoying seeing her own paper sent back 'bedabbled' with Bob's dear but 'very untidy and cook-like writing'. Had her photograph taken this morning; it happened so quickly that she did not have time to think 'what kind of simpering smile' would suit her best; will send Bob one. People keep asking to see Bob's photograph and are surprised when she does not have one.

Jeanne Salomonson stayed till Sunday morning. On Friday night Bessie's aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven]'s two sisters [Alida and Agatha] came to visit with a girl who is living with them for a while, 'a most horribly uninteresting dull & unartistic kind of being' who yet had the 'pretence of being very musical'. playing the piano abominably but trying 'the most difficult & beautiful things'; felt 'rubbed up the wrong way' when she went to bed, 'horribly sarcastic & terribly sour'. Mr Kattendijke came on Saturday to accompany Jeanne and they did some 'wonderful Brahms songs'; on Sunday they went to a piano recital by Harold Bauer which was partly quite good, but at the end he played 'such horrid firework things' that it nearly spoilt everything else and made him think less of him. Has had a nice letter from Madame Goriany, the Austrian lady Bob met at Roccabella [Taormina, Sicily]. Is working hard on the translation for Ambro [Hubrecht] about 'the absorption of fatty matter into the intestine'. Their cousins, the van Deldens, and their daughter are coming tonight; soon they are going south and then perhaps to the Dutch colonies. Has written to Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s mother about the violin, and is curious to know the answer.

Continues the letter next day: is going to spend the day in Leiden, first calling on a 'dear cousin' [Louise Hubrecht] who has known her since childhood and lunching with Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] at her mother's. Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht] appeared suddenly at dinner; an enormous whale was stranded on the coast two days ago, and he has secured it for his university [Utrecht]; she has been able to give back her translation as the usual man is well again; he says he has sent his 'American speech' to Ravello. A pity the Frys cannot visit [on the way back from Italy]; hopes to see them soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Met the 'old postman' on his way back from the station so got her letter early; tipped the postman a shilling last week so he did not mind handing it over, and probably 'knows the sort of person these constant Dutch letters come from' and sympathises with Bob's eagerness. Glad that her letter was so cheerful. If the legal papers are long delayed, expects he will be able to sign them in Holland; if it is just a matter of a few days will be better to wait and sign them here. Thinks she is right that the Flushing route is best to travel back on. Does not know which hotel his parents will stay at [in the Hague]; thinks his father mentioned this in the letter to her uncle; thinks he himself will stay at the Twee Stede. Needs to get a topper; if he gets one in the Hague this will save taking a hat box. His mother has knitted him a white tie; asks if this would do. If his father's letter does not decide her uncle against it, she must tell him that Bob is 'very strongly against it'; though he would give in if there turns out to be a reason such as her aunt wanting it. Aunt Annie [Philips]'s silver candlesticks have come and are 'very splendid'; Mr [Charles Augustus] Fitch, the Trevelyans' clergyman in Northumberland, 'has sent a very pretty little silver mustard pot'. Hopes that Madame Dolmetsch, who sometimes visits the Frys, will come to play the clavichord; Dolmetsch could get them the Bach clavichord music; Bob is sure Bessie could play it 'well enough to please [him]', anyway he looks on the clavichord 'more as a picture than as an instrument. The roses are coming up well. Thoughts about married happiness Glad she likes 'P. & P.' ["Pride and Prejudice"] which is 'great fun'. May go to Roundhurst for a night with the Frys if it is fine on Saturday; will probably go to London on Monday. Expects she will bring her bicycle over.

Letter from Bramine Hubrecht to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence. - She and her husband have often thought and talked about Trevelyan since he left them, wondering what the future will hold; they 'must leave that to dear Bessie'. Things will be hard for them both now: Bessie will be in 'isolation' at home, as she will not be able to discuss this matter with Bramine's parents or sister unless she is 'absolutely clear in her own mind - it would be mental torture'. The 'terrible business of the [Second Boer] war' will also make an impression on her, feeling as she already does so strongly 'the wrench which marriage with a foreigner would be'. The worst thing about the war is 'the hypocracy [sic] with which all the English statesmen seem to be saturated', preparing for six months while giving the Boers the 'illusion' that an agreement could be made; and then there are speeches like that of Balfour and 'other so called honourable and religious gentleman'. Meanwhile, Harcourt 'protests, but will vote for the money [further military funding]! Is there then no generous mind left?' Are the English so much come down since Lord Chatham?'. In Chatham's day, however, the war was 'against men of the same race' rather than 'those stupid Boers, who live according to their antiquated notions derived from the old testament'; is 'bitter, very bitter, against the wicked Government', however much she likes Trevelyan, whom she calls 'my dear fellow'. As for Queen Victoria, 'one sees how, by being a sort of machine all one's life, one becomes one really at last'; wonders why she did not appeal to the nation; also criticises the other rules who sent ambassadors to the peace conference and 'do not move an inch to help against war', it is a sign of how low the 'moral standard' everywhere seems to be. In time the world will be 'one big Exchange' with no poetry, and nothing mattering but money and greed.

Returns to the letter after several days, now in Rome; meanwhile the British Parliament, apart for a few Irish representatives, have voted funds for the war; cannot understand the Whigs. She cannot sleep at night, and having 'loved the English so', nearly hates them now; cannot write to Bessie about Trevelyan, and in her place 'could never consent to give up my birthright of Dutchwoman, to become a subject of that wicked mecreant [sic] the prince of Wales', who 'sells his soul and that of his subjects for the gold of Africa' and will not even go out to fight himself. Has just received a letter from Bessie, which says Trevelyan is going to see her; prays that if he wins her love his influence may 'widen and deepen her love for all beings and things'. Feels 'very responsible in this matter', since it was she who brought them together, and Bessie is 'half sister, half child, exceedingly dear'. Would be 'dreadful if she became tainted by what seems... the national vice of the English = selfdeceiving egotism, overbearingness, hypocrisy' which they call 'commonsense'. Begs his pardon for speaking so openly, which she does as she knows he has 'width of mind enough to shake off all chauvinistic feeling'; perhaps he does not think the opposition should have refused the funds or resigned.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - His flowers could not be sent on Sunday; fears they will be all withered. Has written to her uncle. His father thinks Bob will be able to sign the papers on Wednesday afternoon and travel in the evening. Will try and see the Dutch consul tomorrow about the birth certificate, though will not be able to show him the copy till his father returns from Welcombe. Will leave things such as the books he has brought for their honeymoon in London; asks again whether he should bring his poems over. Sorry that he 'dare[s] not trust a Dutch hatter' and will buy one in London; ' does 'not consider any "foreigner" has a proper idea of a top hat, except one or two Parisians'. She should settle about the wedding luncheon with her uncle if she feels strongly [about not having it in the hotel]; it would certainly not be 'so homely and nice'; expects Bessie's aunt would be on her side. His mother's cousin Harry [Henry Yates] Thompson has sent them a seventeenth century book on Cambridge 'with prints of all the colleges', a marble paperweight and a silver apostle fork. Has Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s parcel; will bring [Ambro Hubrecht's] spectacles with him. Is going to spend his 'last real Bachelor evening' tomorrow with Tommy Phelps; they are going to see "Tannhäuser"; not a perfect production, but [Milka] Ternina, 'the finest opera actress [Bob] has yet seen', is singing.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to receive Elizabeth's letter; the Trevelyans are 'quite ready to forgive [her] and Robert for the little want of confidence'; tells her to ask 'quite frankly' about anything she thinks Caroline can help with. Wants to feel her 'a daughter in reality and not in name only'; she and her husband will welcome Elizabeth into the family; thinks she will find them 'very quiet people, easy to live with'. Hopes it will not be long before they meet. Glad Elizabeth is 'such a good English scholar' as Caroline knows no Dutch and has forgotten all the German she once knew. Is sure she will take an interest in Robert's work; he has seemed 'so lonely in his Surrey lodging'. Has not seen the house he has taken, but thinks it must be pretty. Glad Elizabeth took her time to decide on marriage. Sends regards to her aunt and uncle; looks forward to meeting them.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Seems Bob may be staying longer in Milan; is sorry for the Frys as Roger Fry is suffering from a bald cold. Has received a parcel from Bob's mother with photographs of his parents and brothers and is very glad to have them. Is glad Bob is enjoying himself at Milan and seeing many beautiful things; curious he has never been before; she remembers the "Cenacolo" [Leonardo's "Last Supper"] 'above all others', and many beautiful things at the Brera, though she and Bramine [Hubrecht] were there during a thunderstorm when it was very dark; looks forward to going again. Bob must not be 'too anxious' about her: she has got over her initial misery at their parting and now he is 'haunting [her] only pleasantly', as he says; she could not be made miserable by thoughts of him as she loves him too much; also trusts him completely.

Returns to the letter in the evening; has been out in the rain to see the dentist and 'arrange a torture hour with him', though less needs to be done than she feared; tonight is Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht]'s third lecture, and Paul [his son] has come to see the whale [see 8/14] and will probably go to the lecture on her ticket. Her aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven] has had a letter from Bramine, with an 'enthusiastic account' of how they [the Grandmonts?] are looking after the eye patients [at Taormina] and how helpful Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is now. Returns the next day to scold Bob for saying that 'modern art scarcely seems to exist' in Italy; says this is too sweeping a statement and fears 'Fry's dogmas' have been influencing him after all; hopes he will always 'be as inclusive as possible'. Went to Ambro's lecture after all; Paul stayed at home and worked, and this morning has gone to keep an eye on the work of cutting off the fat and baring the skeleton of the whale; he sends many greetings to Bob. The Frys' name for her sounds 'very splendid indeed' and is certainly better than 'Amoretta' which reminds her of 'amourette', a pet hate of hers; she would still like him to call her Bessie or Bess. Very good of him to send her a ring; she will always wear it on the fourth finger of her left hand; a shame he will not be able to put it on her finger and he will have to wear it somehow first.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Wishes Bessie and her uncle and aunt a very happy new year. Very pleased to receive Bessie's photographs; asks if she could send copies to her sister Miss [Anna Maria] Philips, who has always been very good to Robert and his brothers and takes great interest in them. This aunt lives at Tunbridge Wells in the winter with an invalid friend, Miss Wicksteed, who is also very fond of the boys and would like a photograph, and in the summer near Manchester. Caroline has another sister [Margaret Price], a widow living in Gloucestershire; Sir George has two sisters, Lady Knutsford and Mrs Dugdale. Not a large family of near relations; looks forward to introducing them to Bessie. Hopes to hear from Robert about the disaster at Amalfi [the landslip at the Cappuccini Hotel]. Will be in Welcombe from next week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Very sorry to hear of Madame Hubrecht's illness; understands that Bessie will not be able to leave her for some time; hopes she will recover soon though it is a bad time of year for bronchitis. Will be glad to have Bessie whenever she can come, except for the few days around their move to London, which they intended would be around 19 February. Was anxious for Bessie to come to Welcombe as she and Robert would enjoy walks and drives in the countryside and seeing Stratford; hopes she may still be able to spend a week there, then visit the Frys and return to them for a few days in London. Glad Bessie has told Robert to stop in Italy; he writes 'very contentedly from Ravello' and she hopes he has got on with his play.

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