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Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher
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Copies of essays by Bertrand Russell written while reading for the Moral Sciences Tripos

Photocopies of six essays by Russell at the Mills Memorial Library, McMaster University: "On Pleasure; its definition, its causes & conditions, & the possibility of making it the end of rational action, written July 1893, with annotations by H. Sidgwick; "The Relation of what ought to be to what is, has been or will be" written Oct. 1893, with annotations by H. Sidgwick; three papers on Epistemology I-III, two undated, the other dated Nov. 1893, with annotations by J. Ward; and "On the Distinction between the Psychological and Metaphysical Points of View" written [1893/4].

Russell, Bertrand Arthur William (1872-1970), 3rd Earl Russell, philosopher, journalist, and political campaigner

Letter from Lord Romilly to Henry Sidgwick

Offering a photograph of a Greek manuscript of the Athanasian Creed in St Mark's Library, Venice to the College, with explanation of its source; copy of a letter by Rawdon Browne on 'the remaining seven photographs'.

Romilly, John (1802-1874) 1st Baron Romilly, Master of the Rolls

Notes relating to the life of Henry Sidgwick

Notebooks: 'List of articles & reviews by Dr Sidgwick with remarks by E[leanor] M[ildred] Sidgwick', including several loose sheets and gatherings [item 1]; recording references to Sidgwick in the [Cambridge University] Reporter, 1870-1979 [item 2], Oct 1876-June 1886 [item 3], Nov 1886-1894 [item 4], 1895-1896, [item 5, labelled 1894-1896], 1897-1900 [item 6]; recording references to and contributions by Sidgwick in the Cambridge University Gazette, 1868-1869 [item 7]; 'University & College Reforms', also including two printed sheets (notes by Sidgwick re Council,12 Jun 1870, and re compulsory Greek [May 1872]) and one MS sheet of notes re the Syndicates [item 8]; 'List of Dr Sidgwick's Lectures from University Reporter, 1870-1900' [item 9]. Printed prospectus of Cambridge lectures in moral science, 1887-1888 [item 10].

Letter from Charlotte F. Patterson to Nora Sidgwick

Explains that she heard from [James] Bryce that Nora would like to have part of Henry Sidgwick's correspondence with her father [Arthur John Patterson]. Reports that she has spoken to her mother, who will be happy for Nora to have the letter as soon as they get back to town, which will be in the early part of September.

Patterson, Charlotte Frances (b 1872) daughter of Arthur John Patterson

Letter from Arthur C. Benson to his aunt Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for sending back the letters from Henry Sidgwick. Undertakes to see if he can find any more from him, but doesn't think there are many, if any. Hopes that his uncle Arthur Sidgwick will cut back on some of his other work, of which he believes he does 'far too much', in order to devote himself to the writing of the memoir. Declares that '[t]he great desideration is that the writer should want to [write] more than anything else in the world - and everything is quickly and well done when that is behind.' Advises Nora to ask Maggie if she can find any letters, and states that there are a good many papers at [ ]. Undertakes to look there when he goes back there in August.

Benson, Arthur Christopher (1862–1925), poet and college head

Letter from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick.

Reports that he was down at Haslemere the previous Saturday to Monday, and that he [and H.G. Dakyns] worked on the rest of Dakyns letters. Refers to the need for discretion, which Nora had mentioned, and states that he regards all the letters as confidential. Relates that Dakyns was 'infinitely good over the letters', and claims that between them they have dated nearly all of them. Believes that they will be helpful 'at every point except what concerns [Henry Sidgwick's] administrative Cambridge work', and states that they show 'himself on many sides', and that his 'infinite unwearied thoughtfulness, and quiet wisdom, and great range of interest, and kindness, are apparent everywhere.'

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Letter from E.E. Bowen to Nora Sidgwick

Sends her the only letter [from Henry Sidgwick] that he can find [not included]. Remarks that the freedom and freshness of it still seems very vivid to him. Advises her in relation to her plan to write a memoir, that it would be best 'in the form either of an introduction to some posthumous publication, or else of a magazine or review article.'

Bowen, Edward Ernest (1836-1901) schoolmaster

Letter from J.W. Cross to Nora Sidgwick

Sends Nora three letters [from Henry Sidgwick; not included]. Remarks that their quality 'is very characteristic in the generosity of appreciation of another's work.' Discusses the dating of the correspondence and explains how he had estimated the dates. Refers to Middlemarch, to which Henry had referred in one of the letters, and to the latter's favourable reaction to it. In relation to the third letter of 29 April 1880, states that he sends it for Nora's own reading only, as he does not want it to be published.

Cross, John Walter (1840-1924) banker

Letter from J.W. Cross to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter. Claims that one of the letters that gave him 'more pleasure than almost any letter' he ever received in his life was one from Henry Sidgwick referring to an article Cross had written in January 1879 called 'American [ ]'. Remarks on Henry's 'uncommon generosity in dealing with another person's small work....' Explains that he has mislaid this letter, but undertakes to send Nora any others that he comes across.

Letter from Constance Jones to Nora Sidgwick with enclosures

Thanks her for her letter. Refers to the enclosed letter and copy of minute and tells her to keep them. Reminds her that [Henry Sidgwick's] article on 'The Philosophy of Common Sense' was published in Mind in 1895. Announces that she is having a children's party on the following Monday, but claims that 'it will seem very different from the times when [Nora has] been so kind as to come'.

Jones, Emily Elizabeth Constance (1848-1922) philosopher and Mistress of Girton

Letter from Mary Ellen Martineau to Nora Sidgwick

Regrets to inform her that she is unable to find any of Henry Sidgwick's letters among her father [James Martineau]'s letters. States that if they were by any chance sent to Dr Drummond in connection with his and Professor Upton's memoir of her father, he will return them without delay.

Martineau, Mary Ellen (1833-1902) children's author

Letter from Mary Ellen Martineau to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that she has at last found a letter to send to Nora, from Henry Sidgwick to her father [James Martineau], on the subject of the Free Christian Union. Explains that Dr Drummond found it, and that it is dated 22 February, but has no year on it. Undertakes to send on any more letters that turn up.

Martineau, Mary Ellen (1833-1902) children's author

Printed memorial to Henry Sidgwick, entitled 'Memorial to the Late Professor Henry Sidgwick'.

Refers to a meeting held at the Lodge of Trinity College 'to consider what steps should be taken to perpetuate at Cambridge the memory of the late Professor Henry Sidgwick...' on 26 November 1900, and lists the resolutions that were passed at it. Refers to a meeting of the General Committee on 24 Jaunuary 1901, at which appointments to various posts were made; and to a meeting of the Executive Committee on 21 October 1901, at which it was agreed that the money subscribed to the memorial fund should offered to the University to be used to establish and maintain a university lectureship 'or other teaching office in Moral Science to be connected with the name of Professor Sidgwick.' Reports that the offer was accepted on 7 November 1901, and that regulations for the lectureship were adopted by the University at a Congregation held on 12 December 1901. List of subscribers included.

Letter from Basil Champneys to Nora Sidgwick

Sends her a copy of a letter to him from Henry Sidgwick [not included], which he suggests might be of some use to her. Remarks that the latter part of it is an example of 'the accuracy and tact of [Henry's] judgment in matters of general culture'. Expresses his pleasure at the news that Nora and Arthur Sidgwick are to write a memoir of Henry. Refers to a paper by Frank Cornish in the Pilot of 22 December, which he describes as 'admirable', and offers to send it to her if she has not yet come across it. Adds that he has put, 'by way of a note, the passages in [Robert Bridges'] "[Pros]ody of [Milton]" referred to in [Henry's] letter at the end....' Expresses the hope that 'the change and holiday' will do Nora great good, and reassures her of their sincere and deep sympathy. Offers to send her the original letter if she wishes to have it.

Champneys, Basil (1842-1935) architect and author

Letter from Basil Champneys to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses his gladness that Henry has got a good mortgage, and reports that he hears from Mr P[ ] that it was 'perfectly sound'. States that he has looked over Bridges' pamphlet [Robert Bridge's Prosody of Milton?] again, and remarks, on reading it again, 'how very little [ ] prosody can carry you in explaining the secret of good verse...', and that he quite agrees with Henry about the end of lines. Goes on to discuss the content and form of the verse, and refers to the use and accentuation of foreign words, e.g., in French and Latin. Refers to Milton, Pope, and Shakespeare. Asks Henry if he knows P[atmore's]. 'Studies of the English Metrical Law', published as a preface to Amelia. Also refers to [a report] in the Globe of the previous Friday that 'German bands in Melbourne had been compelled to play "Rule Britannia" all the time'.

Champneys, Basil (1842-1935) architect and author

Letter from Horatio F. Brown to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that he is sending a packet of Henry Sidgwick's letters to her [not included] - two to [John Addington] Symonds, and the rest to his [Brown's] mother and to himself. Claims to have a good many more letters and memoranda 'full of that exquisite finesse of humour that was so peculiarly his', but that as they all relate to the ' "Life" of Mr Symonds' he doubts that they would be of use to Nora. Offers to send them to her if she wishes to have them. Hopes that she has found 'the Journal Letters.' Sends his mother's best wishes. List [in Nora's hand] of '[l]etters enclosed and copied', and their dates: to 'J.A.S', 'H.F.B', 'Mrs Brown and to 'H.F.D.',

Brown, Horatio Robert Forbes (1854-1926) historian

Letter from Horatio F. Brown to Nora Sidgwick

Sends her the letters from Henry Sidgwick to [John Addington] Symonds [not included], which he found among the latter's papers. Claims that he is sorry to part with them, but that she has every right to them. Confesses that he has kept back one, and offers to send her the original after he has taken a copy, but states that he would like to keep one original letter from Henry 'to Johnnie.' Referring to all of Henry' letter to him [Brown], claims that they were mostly about Symonds 'Life'. Remarks on the fact that in the letters he sends there are references to 'the Journal', and states that that really covered the larger part of their correspondence. Sends his mother's kindest regards. Note in Nora's hand refers to the letters accompanying this letter, and dates from 1881, 1889, and 1892, and states that she has compared copies with originals.

Brown, Horatio Robert Forbes (1854-1926) historian

Letter from Arthur C. Benson to Nora Sidgwick

Refers to an enclosed letter to him from Henry Sidgwick of [18 Nov 1896, not included]; Claims that it demonstrates how Henry helped people by really putting himself 'inside their point of view.' Reports that they are having a bout of influenza at Eton, and that out of thirty-six boys thirty-two are sick. Adds that it is of a mild type however. States that 'Willie has to go home for a few days.'

Benson, Arthur Christopher (1862–1925), poet and college head

Letter from J. Sully to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter. Regrets that he could only find 'a few short letters' [from Henry Sidgwick], and sends 'six and a testimonial' [not included]. Does not think that they will be of any use for the memoir, which he is pleased to hear is being written. Refers to Henry's kindness to him, and claims to 'prize among [his] treasures' Henry's testimonial to him. States how great a privilege it is for him to be associated with him in the work of the International Congress of Psychology in 1892. Refers to his 'almost womanly consideration', and his 'delightful humour', which appear in his letters. Mentions a letter he received from Henry in reply to one from himself asking him to sign a protest 'against carrying the war in S. Africa to the point of conquest and annexation', and offers to send it to her. States that he was sorry to hear of Nora's poor health, but hopes that the change and the fine air 'have re-established it'. Adds that he and Henry 'used to talk much of [insomnia]', which he believes probably bound them together 'almost as much as common philosophic [talks]'. Explains that the enclosed letter of 1879 has to do with a plan of theirs 'to start a sort of hostel'. Claims that he was in 'a hopeless condition of brain-weariness', and that they had to think of some new way of m[ ]ing themselves. Notes [in Nora's hand] states that the letter Sully refers to from HS and referring to the petition against the war in South Africa was sent and is copied, and that the last letter referred to was not copied.

Sully, James (1842-1928) philosopher and psychologist

Letter from J. Sully to Nora Sidgwick

States that he forgot to mention in his last letter [Add.MS.b.71/27] that Henry Sidgwick signed a petition drawn up by him [Sully] and Leslie Stephen in 1883 to the Home Secretary [Sir William Harcourt] asking him 'to reduce the sentence of a year's imprisonment passed on a man P[ ], an avowed Atheist, for blasphemy.' States that some, including Sir F. Pollock, believed that the sentence was not excessive, but that he [Sully] and others thought that it was, and they 'mustered a fair number of good names, including Prof. Huxley, Rev. [ ] Davies, Mr C[ ] [ ], and others.' Adds that Home Secretary acknowledged in the House of Commons that he had received the petition, but stated that he did not intend to act upon it. States that some days previously he came across the empty envelope in which Henry Sidgwick had enclosed his signature [included with letter, Add.MS.b.71/27a].

Sully, James (1842-1928) philosopher and psychologist

Letter from Lord [Hallam] Tennyson to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for letting him see 'these most interesting proofs' [of Nora and Arthur Sidgwick's memorial of Henry Sidgwick], and states that he quite understands that she will have to shorten the draft. Refers to some 'scraps' written to [Henry Graham] Dakyns, which are 'not worthy of insertion'. In answer to questions she had put to him, claims that he cannot remember the exact date of a letter about 'In Memoriam'; that the reference to Wilfrid Ward is to an article on his [Tennyson's] father; and that the reference to Leslie Stephen is to 'an attack of his on the Idylls of the King'. Suggests 'Tod' might refer to [Alpheus] Todd's Parliamentary Government in the British Colonies. Refers to notes in his father's autobiography - Memoir of Alfred Lord Tennyson - in relation to the interpretation of a letter. Adds that he hopes that Nora's brother - Arthur Balfour - 'will s[ ] Parliament soon - for the feeling of unrest [ ] to Arnold-Forster and Co is becoming rampant.' Sends his wife's kindest remembrances.

Tennyson, Hallam (1852-1928) 2nd Baron Tennyson

Typewritten copy of E.E. Bowen's reminiscences of Henry Sidgwick's undergraduate years.

Relates the occasion that he heard the news that HS had won the Craven Scholarship, and describes his wide-ranging academic interests. Recalls a walking tour he took with him in South Wales, and a competition they had to begin 'some stanza of the Odes that the other could not finish.' Refers also to the respect in which his opinion on various matters was held. Some amendments in ink.

Bowen, Edward Ernest (1836-1901) schoolmaster

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Explains that he found her letter of 25 September on his return to his home that night. States that there is nothing in the diary entries that she sent him in the proof [of the memoir to Henry Sidgwick] to which he objects. Remarks that what Henry wrote in the diary is very interesting, and expresses the hope that there is a good deal of it that she can publish. States that he will recommence his search for letters from Henry now that he is in London again for a few days. Believes that he could find some a later date, i.e., between 1870 and 1895. Reports that he [and his wife] have had an instructive, but rather tiring tour in Macedonia and Bulgaria, and sends on his wife's love to Nora. Adds that he has found the last letter Henry wrote to him, and sends a copy of it [not included], and remarks on the 'serenity and cheerfulness' in it and 'the interest in things which still remained with him.' Confirms that the ' "New Academy" ' is the British Academy, 'for whose establishment he [Henry] had taken some pains'.

Bryce, James (1838-1922) Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, politician

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for the letters, which he claims remind him of 'some of the steps connected with the establishment of the British Academy' that he had forgotten. Confirms that the statement Nora sent to him is quite correct, and states that he has added a few words, 'which explain the thing a little more fully to those who may not know the facts.' Believes that it is very possible that he has some of Henry Sidgwick's letters about the [British] Academy, but had not found them before leaving London. States that Henry and Lord Acton were the two who had most faith in the idea, but that his [Bryce']s correspondence was chiefly with Henry. Adds that the other letters reached him safely, and thanks her for them. States that he [and his wife] will be in Sussex until about 25 August, and then they plan to go abroad for five or six weeks. Asks her to let them know if she should be at T[remans]. Adds that they hope to be back [in Sussex] in October.

Letter from M[arianne] Latham to Nora Sidgwick

Tells Nora to do whatever she likes with what she wrote about Nora. Explains that it was originally 'a kind of protest...against some of Mr. Myers' words.' States that the '[ ]field time was certainly first after the vacation at Oban', and recalls C.H. Tawney bringing another man, when Tawney first came home from Oban, and Henry [Sidgwick] coming a little later. Admits that she cannot recall how the tableau vivant question came up, but states that 'the Afghan costume wasnt [sic] the only time Mr. Sidgwick dressed himself up', and recalls having seen him walking about in the garden of a house they lived in in Glamorganshire in an enormous sun hat. Adds that she has not [touched] the [proofs?] because she agrees to whatever Nora thinks.

Latham, Marianne Frances (1839-1926) née Bernard, mistress of Girton

Letter from [Frank] Podmore to Nora Sidgwick

Referring to an enclosed printed extract regarding an estimation of Henry Sidgwick's character, declares that he shall be very glad that the 'few lines should be quoted', and states that he has made some slight alterations in order to bring out the meaning more clearly. States that he shall look forward greatly to reading the book [Henry Sidgwick, a memoir]. Adds that he was reading a few days ago Masterman's appreciation of Henry Sidgwick in The Peril of Change.

Podmore, Frank (1856-1910) psychical researcher

Letter from William Everett to Nora Sidgwick

Apologises for the delay in replying to her letter. Tells her that she is welcome to print the 'little bit' of his if she wishes. Reports that soon after he knew that Nora's book was making good progress he asked the editor of the Atlantic Monthly - a literary magazine - to let him write an article on it, or on Henry Sidgwick himself, as soon as the book comes out. Asks if it would be possible for her to send him 'advance sheets' for this purpose. Declares that he looks back with great interest to Cambridge and Newnham, and adds that it was very kind of Nora to receive him there.

Everett, William (1839-1910) classicist

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