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Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1876-1962), historian, public educator, and conservationist
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Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

On headed notepaper for Kings College Cambridge, with note 'Coventry actually, where I am spending Christmas and New Year with the Buckinghams. - Thanks Bessie for her card and letter; is glad she is 'as comfortable as these uncomfortable times allow. The Suez imbecility has robbed us of both comfort and honour, and I do resent being deprived of both'.

Is well in himself, and still has 'enough money to stem the rising tide of prices', but is unsure how long that will continue; the 'transport problem is an immediate vexation'. Is very glad to have 'got to Greece in the spring', and Leiden for a week more recently.

Unfortunately Florence [Barger] 'lacks her old strength, and has to live more quietly'; Harriet 'looks after her splendidly', and Evert has 'a good and totally new job in London' so will settle there. Has 'satisfactory news of G. M. T. from [George Trevelyan's son] Humphry.

Had a 'charming and unexpected invitation' to eat Christmas dinner with George Moore and his wife; could not accept as he was going to Coventry. 'Various other professorial or semi-professorial lame or semi-lame dogs' would also have been there, 'an unusual and probably most agreeable occasion'. Kings 'seems to have started off well under its new Provost, Noel Annan. Provost [J. T.] Sheppard is in Texas!'

Encloses a Hungarian Relief card, which he 'only got by writing direct to the Lord Mayor [of London, Sir Cullum Welch, who launched the fund]. The Trash [perhaps the Times?] has boycotted it - really disgusting'.

Sends much love, and hopes to see her 'when things get easier - and may they!'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

19 M[anchester] St, W.1. - Is 'sure to be here Wednesday'; asks if a visiting time of 4 pm would suit her. Thanks her for her letter; wants to re-read it, 'but it has fallen on to the floor!'. If 'G[eorge] M[acaulay] T[revelyan]'s morality has gone sour' his own 'sensitivity is certainly doing likewise; as the date of his 'release' from the clinic 'recedes and recedes', he is 'seeing all its faults'. His wound 'went wrong again this morning' and he is back in bed. If her car is free when he is ready to come out, he 'might be very glad of it'; he has offers of transport from both Hilton Young and Leonard Woolf, but seems likely to lose them through delays. indeed he has 'certainly lost Hilton's, as he goes away in it on Thursday'.

Had a good long letter from Bob at Grasse; he seems to be 'enjoying himself' and to be 'entertained by H. G. Wells'. He himself is reading Paradise Lost 'with pleasure': it suits his mood, which is 'gloomy yet unable to contemplate realities. God's frightful muddles: his inability to make either Hell or Eden work:... his readiness to throw Christ into the soup - what a puerile yet what a terrific universe!'. Is also reading [his own] Abinger Harvest, 'though not alas on Worthing Pie'; it is a 'real comfort' to him that it has come out just now, is liked by his friends, and by many of the critics.

May D. [?Dickinson] has been to tea, at a time when Morgan was sitting up. Robin Mayor is visiting again soon: 'what a warm hearted nice chap he is'. Has 'quite lost the feeling of dryness' Mayor used to give him. Is very lucky to have 'friends in various generations', a good fortune which Bessie also shares. Note up the side of the letter saying that her letter has been picked up from the floor; his reply 'is not nearly nice enough for it, but shall go' all the same.

Postscript dated 'Sunday evening' [29 Mar] saying that he has had 'good and surprising news': MacDonald says whatever the state of the wound, he will be able to travel on Thursday; Leonard Woolf could therefore take him in his car. Will see her on Wednesday.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

King's Coll., Cambridge. - Must write by return of post, and 'not delay until I compose that illusory 'real' letter which I am always intending to send'. Feels 'overtired and fidgeted', but 'alright in health', and has 'found much more comfort than I expected here, as well as the expected friendliness'. The 'young Wilkinsons' with whom he is lodging 'seem quite perfect'; thinks 'all that side of life will go on without jolts'.

His 'big room' at College is also starting to look right at last; now sits in it with 'my personal past and ancestral past stacked around me in comparative order, and quite a large coal fire inside my father's chimney-piece, reinforced by an electric fire'. Is 'exhausted mentally and intellectually, but the shock of being uprooted is bound to come out somehow', and he is glad that he can 'eat, sleep, and carry on socially'.

Called at Trinity recently, 'seeing the windows lit up [in the Master's Lodge] and thinking a reception in progress'. Found 'only the Master [G. M. Trevelyan] and his wife, and Robin Mayor and his wife', so they had 'a very nice old codgers' tea party'; Hilton Young and his wife appeared at the end, though Kathleen Kennet 'would scarcely relish being classed as a codger - or codgeress'.

Florence [Barger] has returned; her visit to America was 'a great success', and she has brought back her sister [Margaret?] with her. Sends love to Bob - his proof-correction must be interesting. Expects they will spend Christmas at the Shiffolds; hopes 'domestic arrangements keep all right'. Agnes' foot 'got very bad in the final pandemonium' and she went off to her niece's in Barnet in a car. Has been to see her; she 'seems happily placed', and her room is very nice.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

W[est] H[ackhurst]. - His cough is much better, and he has been to London a couple of times. Did 'not hint to the Master and Masteress [of Trinity, George and Janet Trevelyan, see TRER/ADD/38]' that they should invite Bessie, but 'merely mentioned your name in passing as that of an esteemed acquaintance'; did not mention Miss Simpkins 'at all. So there!'. Hopes she will enjoy the visit and have good weather; May Dickinson and others will be 'delighted' to see her.

Florence [Barger] has 'now left Manchester for Durham'; they 'long for her to come back'. The Rede Lecture [at Cambridge] is a single one; Forster has been asked to give it on Virginia Woolf, on 29 May. Augustus Daniel gave it last year on 'Some Approaches to a Judgment in Painting'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Thanks Bessie for her 'kind letter'; meant to ring, but has been in bed for the last three days with a cough and cold. Is now better and out of bed. Expects to stay with the Bells at Charleston at the beginning of May. Clive says there is 'little "private news" [about Virginia Woolf's suicide], except that she was threatened by a return (it would have been the fifth) of her terrible illness. Understandably, she could not bear the prospect'. Leonard is 'as always reasonable and stoical', and so far Vanessa has not 'broken down' as she did at [her son] Julian's death. He himself has of course been 'much upset', and her sympathy is welcome; he 'found it so repulsive to get letters and telegrams from no less than six newspapers wanting me to do articles at once'.

Had meant to write on a happier subject: his 'delightful call upon G. M. T[revelyan, recently appointed Master] at Trinity', who was very pleased with [the Master's Lodge] 'and all sorts of improvements were in full swing'. Had 'the kindest of greetings'. Asks why Bessie doesn't pay them a visit.

Everyone in his house has colds; Florence [Barger] is 'nursing hers with special care, as she goes to Manchester on Tuesday'. Sends love to Bessie and Bob. Adds postscript: saw May Dickinson and her sister Hettie Lowes at Cambridge, and Sheppard 'as usual'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Perfect recent weather; has done 'a fair lot of work' and thinks he is 'well started' on his new play about 'a man who comes back from the Crusades and finds his enemy in occupation of his castle'. [C.P] Scott, editor of the "Manchester Guardian", has asked him to send an account of the landslip disaster [at the Cappuccini hotel]; if Scott prints his letter he will show it her, as his 'first and perhaps... last attempt at journalism'. The accounts of the landslip in the papers are 'greatly exaggerated'; Bessie need not worry about him. Once read a review of [Kenneth Grahame's] "The Golden Age" by Swinburne, 'with more than his usual extravagance of praise'; was rather disappointed when he read some of it soon after. Fry's sister Isabel has written 'a somewhat similar book, but with no pretentions', which he thinks is worth 'twenty golden ages'; it is called "Unitiated" and he will get it for Bessie to read; Isabel Fry is very nice, and a little like Bessie in temperament. Will lend her [Stephen Philips'] "Paolo and Francesca"; does not think much of it. Is too lazy to copy out verses, as he promised. Agrees that it is wonderful to think of going out for dinner together; not that either of them do that much, but in moderation it is very good, and he has never dined out enough for the 'novelty of it to be spoilt' as it is for her uncle. Teases her about her dreams. Is sure with her uncle and Lord Reay's advice they will be able to arrange their marriage properly; they should have as few formalities as possible, and avoid being married again in England if they can; would like the date to be as soon as possible, in June, but she should decide. Notes that this is the last letter he will send dated 1899, and '1900 will look awfully odd'.

Very interested by her description of her childhood; Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is certainly ' not the sort of person to have understood [Bessie] at all'; he had something of the same difficulty with Charles, who however tried to be sympathetic and a good brother to him; Charles 'had a sterner and more orderly temperament' and Bob 'the more haphazard one'. George is 'a sort of cross' between the two, but with much more intellect than Charles. Encloses a letter from Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; knew she had taken a fancy to Bessie; 'her staccato style is admirably expressive. She does it in conversation often'. Had said in his letter that his parents might visit Sicily next winter and she might possibly see him with them and Bessie next year. Has nearly finished reading [Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant"; thinks it 'a most remarkable novel' though it does drag in places. Calls the muses her 'real rivals, my dear nine mistresses'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - There is not sufficient paper in the hotel to answer her long letter as it deserves. Strange that he is not inspired to write Bessie love-poetry, but says he is 'not good at putting difficult and elaborate and wonderful thoughts into verse', which would be needed; will try one day. Sorry that Gredel [Guije] failed. Since he sometimes misses out words in his letters, Bessie need never be shocked by his 'wicked opinions' but can add 'nots' when she pleases and 'convert the sense to please [her] fancy'. Glad she is re-reading [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant". Sends her kisses "blown through the ether like waves of light or electricity'. Continues the letter next morning, copying out an extract about Shorthouse from a piece of paper in Mrs Reid's book an extract from a letter from Isabel Balfour; this recalls what his brother [George?] has heard about Shorthouse. The book reminds Bob of Pater's "Marius the Epicurean"; thinks one must have influenced the other; also thinks "Marius" the better book on the whole. Asks his waiter to settle their dispute about Italian grammar, which he does in Bob's favour. Returns to the letter in the afternoon: old Palumbo died this morning, and since his wife did not want Bob to leave, he is staying in a separate part of the house where he is 'quite out of the way'. News has just come that the Cappuccini hotel at Amalfi 'has subsided on a great part of it' and some people have been killed. Writes again in the evening having gone to see the landslip, which was as bad as the rumours; seven or eight people died, and 'part of the end of the hotel had gone'. The people say it is St. Francis' doing, "angry because his monastery had been put to base uses". Had never been to Amalfi before, though this is his third visit; not much to see 'except the people and the beggars', and the Cathedral is 'spoilt by restoring'. Palumbo was dying about the same time as the landslip, and the proprietor of the Cappuccini, a friend, was here comforting Madame Palumbo when the news about the hotel came. 'They say he almost fainted... [and] will probably be ruined, as no one will dare come to his hotel now'. Bob exerted himself greatly on the journey down to Amalfi and back and 'sweeted (in Grandmont language' despite the bitter cold.

Originally enclosing a 'charming letter from [Eddie] Marsh'; his 'first Cambridge friend' who works in the Colonial office 'though, like many there, he does not like the war'; gives a brief character sketch. Has also heard from [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson. Has not heard from [Bernard] Berenson, but has from [Mary] Costelloe, whom he just asked Berenson to tell; 'rather annoying', as he 'care[s] for Berenson very much, and dislike Mrs C.', though it was a 'perfectly proper letter'. Is very troubled by [Lina] Duff Gordon's letter: her wish for his happiness is 'unmistakeably sincere', as she always is, but her reply to his wish for them to remain as good friends is that since he told her nothing about this when he saw her 'constantly' in London last October, things can never be quite the same. It would have been very difficult to tell her, but feels that perhaps he should have done, not because she was an 'intimate friend' - the only one of his friends he told, 'for special reasons', was Fry - but because Mrs Costelloe had been spreading rumours that she was in love with him. Perhaps this was true, and he should have realised, although he does not think he gave her reason to believe he was in love with her; it is possible that Mrs Costelloe has stirred up trouble, as 'she has a great influence over Miss D. G.' and he believes her 'really to be a bad woman, though with many good qualities'. Is going to see Palumbo's funeral start for Naples. Writes again in the evening, after writing at 'my cliff, the Cembrone [Cimbrone]'. Quotes from a letter from Tom Moore: Moore thinks he will 'make a good husband' but spoil all his children. Has received Bessie's next letter, but not the photographs. He can skate, but not very well. Does not think Buller's defeat will make much difference to British attitudes to the [Second Boer] war; discussion of the war; does not think it would be good if all of South Africa were governed by the Dutch, would not object to 'an independent Dutch South Africa if it were well governed, and the natives treated properly' which currently happens in the Cape but not in the Transvaal. Methuen and probably Buller are not equal to the people against them, but this does not mean the English have fought badly; however, she need not worry that he is 'becoming Jingo'. Sorry Bessie has missed Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s violin; when one good enough becomes available, will get it for her. They must visit Ravello together; Madame asked if they would come here on their honeymoon, which they will have to discuss; she intends to keep the hotel for some years at least.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel de la Poste, Bruxelles. - Bessie's letter is much the 'best and nicest and loveliest' - though not 'lovingest' - of their 'first real love-letters'. Glad that she is making progress with Plato; the introduction may help, though 'in some most important directions Jowitt [sic: Benjamin Jowett'] does not know much about it'. Went to a bad French play which was even worse than the opera [Massenet's "Cendrillon"]. Tonight is going to hear [Frederic] Lamond whom his mother took him to see when he was about twelve, his first classical concert, and he was 'entranced', particularly by the Liszt; he kept 'leaning forward with his face in his hands, like [his] brother George' and his mother was worried people would be shocked by his 'bad behaviour'. Lamond's programme is all Beethoven this evening. Spent the morning reading [Thomas Sturge] Moore's "Danaë" at the gallery, opposite 'the magnificent Metsys of the life of Anna'; detects a 'sort of affinity between Moore and the Flemmish [sic] people'; certainly neither of them are classical. Wants Bessie to read "Danaë", which is 'wonderful, though wayward and awkward in places'. Nearly went to a music-hall last night as they are meant to be excellent here; would have been better than the 'awful play'. Has not been 'enslaved' by a 'Belgian or Gallic sorceress'; will take Bessie to a music-hall one day to see the 'only living art', in England at least. Teases her about her ability to fold sheets. Will reach the Hague at about eleven, and change and wash before lunch. If her letter was 'foolish', it was only in the 'good sense' Plato talks of; quotes [William] Blake.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Blames the 'heat which brings on indolence' for his delay in replying to her last letter. Saw Madame Grandmont at the Bowmans', where he spent a very pleasant evening; she has since written to say he can visit in early September, so asks Bessie to tell her that will suit him very well. Is not going to Bayreuth, so will come straight out to Holland, which he is looking forward to seeing again. Has left the heat in the South of England and come up to 'the cool and airy atmosphere of Northumberland'. Is glad she likes the Odyssey; her translation is 'quite correct and scholarly', although a little too Biblical and free with 'withals' and 'verilys'. Agrees generally with what she says about [Henry] James: he need not always be so obscure, though 'vague ideas can often only be vaguely expressed'; discusses some of the characters and scenes he admires. Supposes she will be going to Denmark now; hopes she enjoys her music there; he has heard little for weeks and fears he will not until he goes to Holland. Is glad she enjoyed "Marrow and Asparagus" [his "Mallow and Asphodel"]; but she must like [Thomas Sturge] Moore's poems better, particularly "The Vinedresser", "The Panther", and "At Bethel"; the parts of Moore's poetry he likes 'mean more to [him] than anything that has appeared in England since Browning's early and great days". Will send for [Lagerlof's] "Antichrist Miracles" as is keen to see Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] 'glorified by fiction', even if she is depicted as 'a witch or Fiery, instead of the mild lady she really is'; has always intended to make her 'the subject of a romance' when he takes to writing novels in his old age. Bessie can keep [his father's] "American Revolution" until he comes. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts. His father has just bought a Madonna by [Francesco] Francia; they are all very pleased with it, though he is amused by the comments of the servants. The butler secretly prefers the not very good copy of Raphael's "Madonna della seggiola" which used to hang in the room; he says the 'lady' is pretty '(being good protestants, they won't call her the Madonna or the Virgin)', but the baby is 'rather a funny-shaped baby', and at least Raphael gave his child some clothing; says Mrs Prestwitch [sic: Mary Prestwich] (the old nurse, now housekeeper) knows more about babies than he does, and she is not sure about the baby; supposes neither he nor his brothers were 'exactly that type of infant' when they were in her nursery.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Roundhurst, Haslemere, Surrey. - Apologises for not writing sooner: has taken him a while to gather his thoughts on English books for her to read. Has not read Browning's letters to his wife, but her father tells him they are quite amusing; if they are as good as the one she read out to him, they should certainly be worth reading. There is also Mackail's life of William Morris, which he intends to read as Mackail knew Morris well and is a 'competent writer'; saw an excerpt which looked fun, as it should as 'Morris was a magnificent joke himself as well as a splendid person'. Has not yet read Henry James's "The Awkward Age", which is said to surpass all his earlier ones in difficulty, but recommends "In The Cage", or "Daisy Miller". Next week T[homas Sturge] Moore's book, "The Vinedresser and Other Poems" comes out, but he is sending a copy to the Grandmonts; is not sure whether they will like it, as it has 'great faults, which people with classical tastes are almost sure to dislike', but believes many of the poems are 'nearly perfect in their own queer way'. Recommends his father's book, "The American Revolution Pt I" which is 'at least readable and amusing"; his brother George's "The Age of Wycliffe" has already gone into a second edition. The middle part of the letter can be found as 13/85.

Ends by telling Bessie to get the third volume of Yeats' edition of Blake, 'read all the poetry that is not mad' and "The Book [Marriage] of Heaven and Hell", and look at the pictures. Hopes Miss [Emma?] Dahlerup is well; expects she will be going to Capri or nearby soon. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Returns the samples of cloth, with comments on which she prefers for Bob's travelling suit; for his [wedding] trousers thinks he should find a light blueish grey cloth and encloses a sample of the colour she recommends; tells him not to get the coat of his travelling suit made too short as her aunt thinks he looks as if he is growing out of his old one. Has looked up the address at the British consul at Rotterdam, Henry Thuring [sic: Turing]; her uncle remains of the opinion that Bob should write to the consul and she agrees this is much more courteous; suggests he send the letter to Sir Henry Howard with a note informing him of their plans. Her uncle has been reading the marriage contract to her; it goes now to the notary 'for a last polish' and will soon be sent to Bob for his approval. Asks him to tell her when he does the shopping in London for the beds; discusses the things which his mother is kindly going to send some things from Welcombe. Will write to Charles and George [Trevelyan] to thank them for the music box. Goes for a lesson in Amsterdam [with Eldering] on Friday, and will stay the night with 'cousin [Gredel] Guye'; then goes to stay with an aunt at Hilversum till Sunday; will spend Sunday with her [half] sister [Theodora] who 'lives in the farm with her husband the socialist', and return to Amsterdam to [her sister] Mien, who has invited her to stay for the evening entertainment after Joachim's concert to meet him. When Joachim plays at the Hague next Friday, she will go with Alice Jones, who is staying a little longer than [her brother] Herbert. Cannot fit in a visit to Almelo [to see her friend Jeanne Salomonson Asser] and her other sister [Henriette] before May. Asks Bob to bring 'the gold spectacles' with him when he comes over. Tuttie [Hubrecht] is coming on May 17 or 18; her own birthday is on 21 May, asks if Bob could come before that. Encloses a newspaper cutting with a poem by Vondel's contemporary Hooft, translated by

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinse[gracht], the Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Hopes Bob enjoys his week in Cornwall; asks if Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies is going too. Is very sorry to hear about Mrs [Helen] Fry's illness; even a slight attack of pleurisy is serious, and it shows how weak she is, at least about the lungs; the amount she smokes cannot be good for her. Thinks the measurements of the box for music [see 9/42] are quite right; asks if the partitions could be taken out to give more room. Will write to thank George and Charles [Trevelyan]. Went to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture about the evolution of the eye last night, 'interesting but hard to follow'. Will talk to her uncle this evening about the wedding since the answer from [Thomas?] Barclay, the Paris lawyer, has come at last; it seems the consul must be present; has had 'another wretched discussion' with her uncle about whether the consul should be invited to the wedding breakfast, which she does not want; her aunt has now talked her uncle round in secret. Has been reading an article in the "Revue de Paris" on 'Flaubert et l'Afrique'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague'; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Sorry that Bob has a cold; he should 'choose a better way of showing [his] sympathy' with her. Discussion of comforting and sharing things with each other. Bob will have received her uncle's letter; thinks he is right to advise waiting to write to Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] until they hear from 'the Paris oracle' [Mr Barclay; see 9/40]. Hopes Bob has a good Easter with his friends; he must decide whether to go to Salisbury Plain rather than Borrowdale [for their honeymoon] as she does not know either place, and just wants the place to be 'retired from tourists... real country'. Describes Bob's enthusiasm for Flaubert and a performance by him from "La vision de St. Antoine" while they were sitting by the edge of a wood. Charming of [Bob's brothers] Charles and George to think of giving them a box to hold music. Spent a long time yesterday working on her will; it will be almost the same as her sister's. Will go to Amsterdam on Saturday if her cold is better to hear a Brahms chamber concert and have another lesson [with Bram Eldering]. Has read a great deal of "Wuthering Heights"; it is 'tremendously fierce & powerful'. Asks whether Bob has copies of certain books, if so she will leave them behind or give them to someone. The Boers have suffered a great loss with the death of Joubert; asks what the feeling is about it in England. Has had to order more photographs of Bob as she has given so many away. Scolds him for not spelling the name of the place where he lives correctly.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Very pleased with Bob's 'beetle letter', which arrived yesterday; unfortunately when she kissed the creature to 'snatch off' his kisses it broke up, but she has put the pieces together and will 'keep him as a beautiful unicorn'. She and her uncle feel that it would be difficult for her to go to England before the middle of February due to her aunt's illness; will write to Bob's mother soon to tell her; seems natural that he should stay longer at Ravello; whenever he comes, she will not be able to spend as much time with him as before. He will have to send her his 'first journalistic work' as the Salomonson's cannot send her old numbers [of the "Manchester Guardian"] and she does not know where to get them. Says the beetle brought her nice dreams in which Bob was kissing her. Must re-read the poem by [Richard] Crashaw which he copied out for her. Pities Straughn Davidson [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson] for having to act as Bob's 'bucket' [see 9/101] and hopes he appreciated his 'rich breakfast' [of poetry]. Very glad Bob thinks her a good letter writer. Wishes she could persuade her family to get a night nurse, as her uncle's night is disturbed and yet he is not as helpful to her aunt as a trained nurse would be. Had a note from George [Macauley Trevelyan] inviting her to come to Cambridge next month; very kind of him to write, and she hopes they will soon go, though expects she will 'feel terrified'. Likes Bob's father's book ["The Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay"] very much, as well as Crashaw's poem; agrees there are some likenesses between the latter and Browning. Quotes from Dante's "Vita Nuova [xiv]'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very wintry weather; they were 'almost snowed up for three days' and the station could only be reached across the fields. The Runcimans have been here since Saturday; they are 'very pleasant young people' and she thinks Elizabeth would like Hilda, who was at St. Andrews and Girton and 'is very energetic and intelligent'. There is a shoot today; Mr [William?] Watson-Armstrong has joined them. Expecting a party of Charles and George's friends after Christmas, and hope to have 'three cheerful days' before leaving for Welcombe.

Returns to the letter on the following day; does not have an address so will send this to Ravello. Glad to hear that Elizabeth has had 'plenty of music at Amsterdam'. Pleased that Elizabeth's uncle liked George's article ["The White Peril", in "The Nineteenth Century"]. George is 'rather distressed about it' and would have written it 'with much greater care' if he had known it would attract so much attention; she thinks though that it has been useful. Asks if Elizabeth's uncle will soon return home; supposes he will not go south but stay there quietly for the winter. Sir George has now read "Polyphem[us & Other Poems]" carefully and will soon write to Robert. Hopes they had a pleasant time with Mr [Bernard] Berenson; asks how 'the ménage' goes on. Sends regards to Madame Palumbo and Mrs Reid wants to hear all about the Pension now as they know it. Has been very busy with Christmas presents, but all have been sent now. They think 'L[ord] R[osebery]'s speech helpful to a Peace [to end the Second Boer War]'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert and Elizabeth are getting away very soon; not surprised they cannot settle down at home; Elizabeth will have much to do and she hopes she is strong enough. Glad 'some occupations' have been arranged at Ravello, as it is 'a little dull'; wonders how Robert will teach Latin. Sir George once tried to teach her, but she 'was so stupid that it was a failure'. Sweet of Elizabeth to make her a blanket but she must not trouble to finish it before she goes; likes tehm 'big enough to put round [her] back on cold nights' and will think of her when she 'cuddle[s] up into it'. Pantlin has gone to Newcastle to buy presents for the schools' Christmas trees; organising treats for children is always 'rather a bore' but they do enjoy them. The [Henry?] Willoughby Trevelyans are at Wallington for a night and the Spence Watsons will be there for Sunday; he will tell them 'all about Derby'. Hopes Elizabeth has read George's article ["The White Peril", in the "Nineteenth Century"]; asks her to show it to her cousin [Ambrosius Hubrecht] and his sons.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes all is well with Elizabeth and that they will soon be able to go on their travels as normal. Sir George was very pleased with their letters: it is a pleasure to help them, but 'nice to know [they] appreciate it'. Expects Robert's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] in every post. George has 'made a sensation by his article ["The White Peril" in
"The Nineteenth Century" Vol. 50, Iss. 298, (Dec 1901): 1043-1055]'. Sir George is quite well again; they are taking drives and walking in the pleasant weather, and she superintends '"improvements"' and is preparing for Christmas. Hopes Elizabeth has good news of her uncle; asks if he will be at the Hague for Christmas. Is going to get Charlie to dress up as Father Christmas to give the school children their presents. Going to Welcombe on 3 or 4 January. Asks if Robert and Elizabeth have decided on Ravello or somewhere nearer.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Very relieved to get Bob's letter of the 31st December last night; amused that Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] wrote three enthusiastic letters on Christmas Day, to Bob, Bessie, and Bramine [Hubrecht] and that they have all ended up in her hands; 'the dog's story' in Bob's letter very good. Would like Bob to call her 'Florence' as she asks, though she herself will never be able to think of her by that name; the letters show how kind she is 'though she comes it up so queenly in ordinary life'. Has had nice letter from Bramine, who was amused by Bob addressing her formally as 'Mrs Grandmont'; Bramine says Grandmont has not yet promised they will be in the Hague for June [the wedding] but she is sure everything will come right; Grandmont never will commit to future plans. Returns to the letter in the evening saying how tired she is, by nursing her aunt and running the household, but also because her uncle is 'so nervous these last days' and it is 'utterly exhausting to be in the house with him'. He is worried about her aunt's illness, and they have just had a letter dictated by Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht], in bed with influenza in Florence, to a nurse; Bramine is now with her.

Writes the next morning that things seem more cheerful; her aunt had a 'coughing night' but is slightly better. Had a nice letter from Bob's aunt [Anna Maria] Philips yesterday, thanking her for sending her photographs. Will look forward to seeing Bob's letter in the "Manchester Guardian"; the Salomonsons take it so she will ask her [friend Jeanne Salomonson Asser] to look out for it]. Has done hardly any reading, and no practising, for a week. At a concert on Wednesday night, heard some music by Rameau 'like delicate lace-work', then Ysaÿe playing a Bach concerto. His 'rendering was very modernised', which would have disgusted the Frys; she too much preferred a modern piece by Lalo, 'quite perfect in its way'. Hopes to go tonight to another chamber music recital, and tomorrow Lamond is performing a Beethoven sonata she would also like to hear. Her cousin Louise Hubrecht has sent her an "Inquirer" with a review of George [Macauley Trevelyan]'s book ["England in the Age of Wycliffe"] which she looks forward to reading, since she will not have time to finish the book itself before February. Is very glad that Bob is pleased with his work so far and feels 'her nine rivals' [the Muses] have him 'in their blessed power'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear the news of the 'Pinewood relations [the Knutsfords]; sure they are happy to have made it up with L[ionel?], though she does not understand quite 'how things stand about him'. Expects Dolmetsch is 'very interesting to talk to about music'; he has a 'touch of genius'; asks if his 'money difficulties' are settled. Sent some game on Thursday as it was the last grouse shooting on Wednesday and Sir George thought they should go; they should be eaten quite soon. Expecting the H[enry] Y[ates] Thompsons and R[obin] Mayor today; Charles leaves on Monday and G[eorge] on Tuesday. Glad Elizabeth has recovered; 'curious how hurtful fruit seems'. George read an extract from his history yesterday, which they 'all thought very good'. Hopes Robert is refreshed by his 'outing this week'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the visit of her friend [Miss de Natrys]. Sorry to hear she has nettle rash, which is a 'horrid thing'; she herself had it for several weeks on her return from therr travels this year. Glad Robert is better and hopes he will soon make progress; asks if he is working on the novel. Asks if [Roger Fry's] illustrations [for Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"] are finished, and if the arrangement has been made with the publisher [Johnson]. Theo [Llewelyn] Davies is here today, as are Mr [Charles Francis, Jr] and Mrs Adams; the Adamses are American, and he has corresponded with Sir George for a long time so they are keen to meet each other. Tomorrow they are expecting the G [?] Buxtons and two daughters. Asks Elizabeth to write from Pinewood to say how Aunt Margaret [Holland] is. Hopes Robert and Elizabeth will be able to make their landlord do the repairs.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to have Elizabeth's letter with better news of Robert, and that Miss de Natrys is visiting. Sir Alfred Lyall, and Gilbert and Mary Murray, are at Wallington till tomorrow: 'all of us like the talk much'. George has been overworking and took a couple of days off; he has 'started again with fresh vigour' and she hopes Robert can do the same. Asks if Elizabeth has been playing [the violin], and whether she has anyone nearby to accompany her. Has to get another laundry maid: the one they have 'really will not do'; this is a bother to her and Booa [Mary Prestwich] as laundry maids 'are not easy to get'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry to hear Elizabeth is 'a little depressed' and Robert 'not happy about his work'; there are 'always ups and downs with people who write' and 'these mental worries are like illnesses'. Sure that Elizabeth will be able to help him; when things went wrong with his work before he 'would fall quite ill, and throw it all up and rush away'; as an artist herself she will sympathise with him. She must 'keep up [her] own interest in other things' and help him to forget his work when 'not engaged upon it'. The Gilbert Murrays are coming to Wallington tomorrow. They have had pleasant walks and drives recently; Charles has been reading Homer and 'modelling in clay' while George works in the morning; in the afternoon they go for long walks. The croquet hoops remind her of Elizabeth, but no-one plays now. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is pleased the melons were not spoiled, and will send another cream cheese soon.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Note to say that the figs were not sent after all; Booa [Mary Prestwich] discovered they would not stand the journey and forgot to tell her; hopes Elizabeth is not too disappointed. Booa is going to send a cream cheese. The weather is much cooler; C[harles] and G[eorge] cycled to Hallington yesterday and thought it very pretty, and nicely kept especially as Florence [Trevelyan] has not been there for eighteen years. Hope they found all well at the Mill House; sure Mrs E[nticknap] will be glad to have them home; expects Gussie has 'grown an inch at least'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - She and Sir George are very pleased Elizabeth and Robert enjoyed themselves, and that Elizabeth 'so thoroughly appreciate[s] this country'; there is 'little to attract outwardly in the manufacturing districts' and it is 'only the interest in the people who live there' which makes life tolerable. Very quiet on Saturday, as George and [Maurice?] Amos went for a mountain walk, sleeping at Eldon and returning on Sunday evening, while Charles went to Hepple and returns today. The Philipses have come, but they have had a telegram from Sir W[alter] Phillimore saying that his wife was ill so they could not come; a blow since the Nobles had already failed them, and only Miss Riddell coming today to be company for the Philipses. They seem happy, however; hopes 'the girl will not find it very dull'. She seems nice, but Caroline wishes she would not do her hair 'so large'. Booa [Mary Prestwich] was glad of Elizabeth's letter, and asks her to say that the box will be sent today. George has recovered his bag with everything in it; there was nothing 'consumable on the spot' like Elizabeth's wine. Hopes the 'two quiet days' at the Park [home of Annie Philips] will rest Elizabeth before she starts again. Will be interesting for Elizabeth to visit Mr [Herbert?] Jones at Hawarden.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Asks whether Elizabeth and Robert would like to go to the Glasgow Exhibition; very much wants to see the pictures, but neither Sir George nor George will leave their work. They could come up from the Lakes on Monday 29 [July], met her there, then travel back with her to Wallington on Tuesday or Wednesday; she would pay all the expenses. Elizabeth could go straight to Wallington if she did not feel up to the trip to Glasgow, and Caroline would meet Robert there alone, but she hopes she will come.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Elizabeth's box and the key have arrived, and her things have been unpacked; is glad she is in a cool place and 'none the worse for the journey [to Seetoller]. Has no more time to write since George has been 'reading his first Chapter... for the last two hours'. Is glad Elizabeth saw Mrs Scharleib.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Arrived on Thursday evening and found Sir George 'quite poorly with a cold', but he is more or less recovered now. It was 'very vexatious about the Stratford election', but it is 'no worse than before'; shows 'how little reaction there is yet [to the Second Boer War?] in the country'. 'Even the local paper is ashamed of the rioting'. Glad that Miss Martin has been to see Elizabeth, and glad she likes her; she is 'a wonderfully sensibly, & thoroughly genuine person, & the boys owe a good deal to her, in their early training'. Hope Robert had a good time while away. Looks forward to their visit; Robert 'must bring some work, & then there will be three ills grinding out words'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to hear good news about Elizabeth's uncle. Pantlin is ready for Elizabeth to try on the dress; she will have to come on Saturday rather than Monday if she wants it finished before they leave on Thursday. Has written to Dolmetsch about a concert but not yet received a reply; asks whether he is in London at Charlotte Street. Is going to see George at Cambridge today.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Has just received Elizabeth's letter; fears they cannot have her to stay on Friday night, as there is a dinner party that night, then Sir George is holding his 'Breakfast' on Saturday morning, while George will arrive on Friday or Saturday. Invites her and Robert to come after the dinner, since they are in London; would like to introduce her to some of their friends. Tells them to come to lunch on Friday; she will take them 'anywhere in the afternoon'; wants to hear how Elizabeth is.

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