Mostrando 2564 resultados

Descripción archivística
Trevelyan, Elizabeth (1875-1957) musician, known as Bessie
Imprimir vista previa Ver :

1 resultados con objetos digitales Muestra los resultados con objetos digitales

Welcombe House visitors' book

Signatures of visitors with dates of their visits. Entries for 1897-1901 written on pasted-in sheets [from another book?]. Dates of deaths of Paul and Theodore Trevelyan written in by the entries for their last visits.

Newspaper cutting [from the "Times", Monday, June 6, 1910, p.8] regarding a visit by Theodore Roosevelt to Shakespeare's birthplace, Stratford on Avon. Found in the book by the signatures of Roosevelt's party marking their stay from 4-6 June.

'R.C.T. - E.T.' written at the top of the page for 1928, the year of Caroline Trevelyan's death and her son Robert's inheritance of the house. Date of sale of house, 22 Nov 1929, entered. Visit of Julius Röntgen, 28-31 1930, marked by two bars of music beneath his signature.

Letter from Bramine Hubrecht to R. C. Trevelyan

Ede, Villa Ma Retraite. - Thanks Trevelyan for his 'charming little book of poems' ["Mallow and Asphodel"]; thinks she likes "The Playmates" best. Asks if he will be returning to Taormina this winter to 'get fresh impressions in the land of the ancients', or will 'plunge into modernity now'. They would be very happy to see him again. Her cousin [Elizabeth], 'the girl who plays the violin so well' might come to Sicily with them, as she 'wants a change'; they plan to leave Holland at the end of the month, and be back at Taormina by the end of October. Currently, the Netherlands is very excited about the Queen's coronation, and 'the patriotic but ugly orange colour' is everywhere; asks if he is not tempted to come and see 'Holland in its royalistic mood? It looks very pretty and bright'.

Notebook with part of a verse play by R. C. Trevelyan, with letters and other inserts

Text on recto, with additions and corrections on facing pages; extract from play begins with dialogue between Godfrey and Raymond. Insertions [between ff. 8 and 9]: three lined sheets with draft of this portion of the play, several gaps filled in with pencil with suggested dialogue or précis of ground to be covered; three sheets [perhaps from an account book?] with dialogue between Eustace and a forester.

Letter, 14 Oct 1900, from Sophia Caroline Reid to R. C. Trevelyan, written at Selham House, Petworth. - Wonders if Trevelyan is in the neighbourhood, or is likely to be; came here a week ago to stay with her nephew Charles Lacaita and his wife [Mary]; will leave the week after next so fears there is little chance of seeing Trevelyan and making his wife's acquaintance until they come to Ravello. She herself hopes to be there by the end of October. She and Miss Allen were in London for the very hot week in July, looking to hire a new maid; she has 'secured a Swiss woman' whom she hopes will appreciate Ravello. She then spent several weeks in Scotland; enjoyed seeing friends and relations but found 'the climate very trying', with 'almost constant rain' so she did very little travelling. Madame Palumbo [Elizabeth von Wartburg] went with Jipi [?] to Switzerland for several weeks and is better for the rest and change on her return to Ravello; thinks the Pension [Palumbo] re-opens this week; knows Madame Palumbo will be very glad to welcome Trevelyan and his 'sposa' so hopes he will keep to his 'promise' and get there in 'good time'. Pencil notes in French on the back of the letter about the first Crusades and Gérard de Balagne [Godfrey de Bouillon?], also on one side of a printed sheet of meetings of Cambridge University congregation, sent out by Trinity College in October 1900, and a small slip of paper which has a reference to the "Histoire des Trou[badours] by Vaschalde.[with a shelf number, perhaps for the British Museum library?]; also on the back of the letter from Thomas Sturge Moore described below.

Letter [from Thomas Sturge Moore] sending his [poem] "Danaë" to Bob again; hopes it is 'improved'; it is 'certainly longer'. Also returns Bob's 'commentary' so he can see how many of his 'suggestions and corrections have produced an effect' and judge the result. Willing to act on others but thinks it best to talk them over with Bob first. Afraid that George [his brother] 'does not care' to correct now, and Thomas does not like to ask him when his 'interests lie so far apart from poems about little girls'. His eldest sister has done a 'great deal' for him recently, and he hopes she will continue to do so, but he thinks Bob should correct directly onto the proof. Meant to ask him to do this for "Absalom", but forgot. Is 'horrified' about "Danaë's" length and would be glad if about two hundred lines could be cut, but has not preference for one passage over another. Very grateful to Bob for 'taking so much pains'. As well as the pencil notes on the Crusades, the letter has also been used by Trevelyan to note down the name of a hotel, 'Hotel St. Romain, Rue St. Roc [Paris] and a reference to printer Firmin Didot.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Roundhurst, Haslemere, Surrey. - Apologises for not writing sooner: has taken him a while to gather his thoughts on English books for her to read. Has not read Browning's letters to his wife, but her father tells him they are quite amusing; if they are as good as the one she read out to him, they should certainly be worth reading. There is also Mackail's life of William Morris, which he intends to read as Mackail knew Morris well and is a 'competent writer'; saw an excerpt which looked fun, as it should as 'Morris was a magnificent joke himself as well as a splendid person'. Has not yet read Henry James's "The Awkward Age", which is said to surpass all his earlier ones in difficulty, but recommends "In The Cage", or "Daisy Miller". Next week T[homas Sturge] Moore's book, "The Vinedresser and Other Poems" comes out, but he is sending a copy to the Grandmonts; is not sure whether they will like it, as it has 'great faults, which people with classical tastes are almost sure to dislike', but believes many of the poems are 'nearly perfect in their own queer way'. Recommends his father's book, "The American Revolution Pt I" which is 'at least readable and amusing"; his brother George's "The Age of Wycliffe" has already gone into a second edition. The middle part of the letter can be found as 13/85.

Ends by telling Bessie to get the third volume of Yeats' edition of Blake, 'read all the poetry that is not mad' and "The Book [Marriage] of Heaven and Hell", and look at the pictures. Hopes Miss [Emma?] Dahlerup is well; expects she will be going to Capri or nearby soon. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven, with extract from poem based on the "Mahabharata" by Trevelyan

Begins mid-sentence stating that [his brother George's book "The Age of Wycliffe"] is 'a good piece of history', which shows up John of Gaunt as 'a sort of 14th century Taman[n]y ring boss'. Also recommends Rostand's "Les Romanesques", which he read recently and things is even better than "Cyrano". Cannot think of any more modern books for the moment; fears his list is 'chiefly composed of friends' and relations' books'; [Roger] Fry is also bringing out his book on Bellini soon, which is well worth getting. Asks Elizabeth to tell Mrs Grandmont that the Frys would like her to visit when she is in England; gives their address. He himself is getting a house near Dorking at Westcott, and will move in September, when he will be within a mile of the Frys; the house he is giving up at Haslemere is, though, very beautiful. Supposes she has been back from Taormina a while; asks her to send some photographs, especially the ones of 'Mrs. Cacc. [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan] and the dogs' and himself in the loggia. The last few days of scirocco were 'a great bore', but he almost forgives it for preventing the trip up Monte Xerito as it 'made [them] those splendid waves among the rocks'; it also 'put [Elizabeth's] fiddle out of sorts' though, so he could not hear any more Bach suites. Heard Isaye [sic: Ysaÿe] play one yesterday, as well as the Mendelsohn concerto; he was in good form, and he will hear him again playing the Beethoven. Is having a musical week, as he has already seen Paderewski, for the first time, and will hear [Wagner's] "Tristram" tomorrow. 'Paddy was great fun, at all events to look at'; thinks he played a Chopin concerto better than the Beethoven. Spends most of his time at the British Museum library when he is in London; has found a translation of [Joost van den] Vondel there by a Dutch American; it is 'very conscientious and scholarly' but he does not think much of the blank verse; still, he can now go on where Elizabeth left off. Would like to know when Mrs G[randmont] is coming to England, and if Elizabeth is likely to be in London so he can 'make a display of [his] extensive and profound knowledge of Italian painting in the National Gallery'. Not sure whether he is going to Bayreuth yet; discusses times he could come to Holland.

Suggests older books she should read: Keats's letters, most of which are available in Sidney Colvin's edition though he advises getting Buxton Forman's four volume edition with the poetry; Butcher and Lang's translation of the "Odyssey"; Meinhold's "Sidonia the Sorceress" and "Amber Witch", translated by Lady Wilde and Lady Duff Gordon. Could lend her all of these books, as well as [Henry James's] "In a Cage" and his brother and father's books . Asks her to write with news and to say when would be best for him to come to Holland; he will write soon to the Grandmonts when he sends them [Thomas Sturge?] Moore's book. Thinks he remembers Elizabeth said she had never read Jane Austen; she should read them all, especially "Mansfield Park", "Pride and Prejudice" and "Emma". Breaks off mid -sentence: 'by advising to...': 9/71 forms the rest of the letter.

A portion of what seems to be a poem by Robert Trevelyan based on the "Mahabharata", with some explanatory notes, is found with this letter but not referred to in it

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - They have not yet retired to their 'Retraite Edéniencee [ie, at Ede]', as her cousin calls it; does not think they will go before early June. The Grandmonts are still where she left them at Rocca Bella [Taormina, Sicily] at the end of April; they are travelling back with an English friend, stopping only briefly at Florence and Bâle. Was sorry to leave Italy 'like that' but it could not be helped; made her all the more anxious to return another time. Wrote to her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht] and sent her Trevelyan's messages, but does not know whether she will go to England this summer; he does not seem anxious to go and she supposes 'the husband's opinion has great weight in these matters!'. She herself will not be able to; is currently here alone at home with her uncle and aunt [Paul François Hubrecht and his wife Maria] and would not like to leave them when she would have to go 'to fit in with Senior's week at St. Andrews'. Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and the trouble he took with the list of books, though she has not yet got all those he suggested, in part because the library is currently closed. Fortunately the director is a friend of the family and can be persuaded to break the rule forbidding books to be taken or sent into the country, so they sometimes get a good selection sent to Ede; however spring-cleaning is 'a holy business' in this country so she must wait. Asks if Trevelyan could possibly send some of the books he listed: something by Henry James; his father's book; [Robert] Browning's letters; she will get [William?] Morris's "Life" [by J. W. MacKail and his brother's book from the library. Has been reading [Elizabeth Barrett Browning's] "Aurora Leigh" for the first time; asks whether Trevelyan likes it. Will be curious to see Trevelyan's friend [Thomas Sturge Moore]'s poems which he sent to her cousin; wonders whether they will appreciate it; does not think Mrs Grandmont has 'specially classical tastes'. Would be very nice if Trevelyan could come to Ede this summer; unsure still of when exactly would be the best time as she knows nothing of the Grandmonts' plans; thinks probably late August or early September. Is longing to get to fresh air in the country; town seems oppressive after Taormina.

They all feel 'greatly honoured... with all these noble peace delegates' being at the Hague; the Congress was opened yesterday; one of the Dutch members told them 'what a feeble old president Baron de Staal seemed to be' and that 'the first meeting did not promise much'. Is sending some Taormina photographs; the one with Mrs C [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan?] is 'funny but too indistinct'; [Giuseppe] Bruno took the same view which better shows Mrs C. 'like some curious prehistoric Juliet on her balcony'; she has it and will show it to you, or Trevelyan could write to Bruno and ask to see the several pictures he took in her garden of her 'constructions'. Glad Trevelyan has heard some good music in London; she feels out of practice and is looking forward to playing with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] again. Knows her aunt is giving her the biography of Joachim by Moser for her birthday. Will also have to 'make special Vondel studies this summer'; feels she knows very little about him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ede - Ma Retraite. - Delay in writing on her return due to a few days in bed; their plans now finalised, and Trevelyan would be very welcome to visit in September. Is going to see her friends the Bowmans next week and will write to Mr and Mrs [Roger?] Fry if she does visit them for a day from Joldwynds. Most of July her 'married cousin Mrs Röntgen and her boys' will be with her, then in August 'she is going to Denmark taking her sister with her'. Hope Trevelyan will be able to come 'and have a look at Holland and Dutchmen! Some say [they] are not a specifically Dutch family' but they could perhaps show him some 'more so' if he liked. Is very much enjoying the letters of [Robert] Browning and his wife, calling them 'delightful, splendid creatures' and discussing their portraits; asks whether Robert Browning was Jewish. Will be in London for two days before going to Joldwynds, but does not ask him to meet her as she does not know her address there yet and fears there will be time for nothing but shopping: a 'nightmare' for her. Perhaps they could meet at Trevelyan's friend [Roger Fry]'s house.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Is returning two of the books lent her by Trevelyan, both of which she much enjoyed; had no idea the "Odyssey was 'such a wonderful human poem', and wishes she could read it in Greek; the translation is 'very melodious', asks whether Greek scholars approve of it. Found Henry James's "In The Cage" most amusing, though she asks whether 'the subtle suggestive analysis of the emotions & situations sometimes leads to a little mannerism in style'; thought it very clever, and 'a very English book'. Asks if she can keep [Sir George Otto Trevelyan's] "The American Revolution" longer as she has not yet begun it. Expects her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht?] has told him they will be glad to have him as early in September as he can come. Her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] is currently here; goes with her to Denmark for a month at the end of a month which will be 'a delightful dip into music again' as their Danish friends [the Noordewier-Reddingius family?] are very musical. Asks if Trevelyan has heard much this spring, and whether he has decided about Beyreuth. Trevelyan has been neglecting to mention [his own] "Mallow and Asphodel", which she has been enjoying very much; looks forward to reading his friend's poetry which he gave her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht?]. Is reading Keats' letters, through which '[o]ne gets to know the man very well'. Encourages Trevelyan to read a book translated from Swedish into English called "Antichrist Miracles" ["Antikrists mirakler "] by Selma Lagerlof; has 'heard it praised very much' and it is 'all about Taormina, though with different names', fears Mrs Cacciola [Trevelyan] is 'treated rather badly' but has not yet read it. Beautiful hot weather this week, 'just fit for lying in hammocks and reading' though it is easy to get last and 'even a little bicycling seems too much!'.

Resultados 1 a 30 de 2564