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Myers, Frederic William Henry (1843–1901), psychical researcher and essayist
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that nothing fresh has happened, but declares that 'what has happened...seems to [him] to furnish adequate matter for a Dialogue between a Poet and a Philosopher.' Arranges to meet 'at the Restaurant' to talk.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been 'a little out of sorts' since they arrived in Ambleside. Describes the position of Miss Clough's house, and the surrounding countryside. Reports that it is very wet that day, but that the previous day they were on the Lake for two hours. Thinks that Arthur looks 'comfortable well', and that William is better than she expected. Reports that Mr Wheatly Balme 'and his Bride' came to visit the previous day. Explains that the latter's brother is Vicar of Mirfield.

States that Arthur expected his friend Myers from P[ ] that morning, but that he had not appeared. Reports that they have newspapers and many books to keep them occupied. Describes a very hot day that she spent with Minnie and Bessie [Cooper?]. Refers to a conversation she had with Henry on D[ ]ham Down. Claims to have thought about his future life, and refers to the plan he mentioned at Brighton. Thinks of staying at Rugby for the present, where she 'could live comfortable whilst alone...' and states that his plans ought to take a more definite shape before she makes a move. Refers to a fire in London. Reports that Katie Lace is with her [in Ambleside], and sends her love to Henry.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Liverpool]:- Hopes that Arthur 'settled about the bill all right.' Writes to inform her of his travel plans. Goes to the Isle of Man that day to examine there for a week, and in about a fortnight intends to go to Marlborough for another examination. In the meantime intends to call at Wellington College. Asks if they [Edward and Minnie Benson] can take him in, and if not he will go on to Eton after seeing her. When he shall come depends on his hayfever. Anxious to hear about her plans for the summer. Announces that he is going abroad after the Marlborough exam and will come home earlier than he otherwise would if she has a house. Reports that he has not heard from Rugby in a long time. Is not looking forward to a long sea voyage. Wishes now that he hadn't taken the examination. Refers to the Cambridge prizes and to the fact that Arthur won the prize for the composition of a Greek ode. Claims to be very glad that James Rhoades got the English verse, and believes that the disappointment 'will do Myers a great deal of good.' Asks her to tell Minnie that he got the papers all right. Hopes they are all well. Has ordered 'parcels and things' to be sent to Wellington College. Reports that he has been researching the Isle of Man. Asks her when she is going to see the Exhibition, which 'is only like a big shop-window', and claims that the day he spent there with Graham Dakyns he was more bored than he has been for a long time. Asks her to write to him in the Isle of Man.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Asks whether the 'I. of the S.' is proved or not. Wishes Myers to dine with him 'on Thursday at 7.15', and reports that his Anglo-Indian friends, the [Charles?] Bernards will be there, and he wishes them to hear Myers' 'additional evidence'.

Letter from Janet Catherine Symonds to Henry Sidgwick

Suggests that he come to visit them about 28 December for four or five days. Explains that Johnnie could not go away before that. Sympathises with him about photographing. Reports that Johnnie is better than he has been for weeks. Expresses her sympathies in relation to the 'revolution' at Rugby [the departure of the headmaster Frederick Temple?]. Sends her love to Sidgwick's mother, and asks him to tell her how sorry she is for her. Reports that they have had Mr Myers with them a good deal during the autumn. She 'cannot help wondering always if he will "last"...in Mr [Conington]'s sense of the word.' Reports that Dr Symonds is ill again, but hopes that it is just a temporary relapse.

Symonds, Janet Catherine North (1837-1913) author

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

In relation to Easter, states that his plans are uncertain. Is glad that she is interested in [William] Lecky. Gives his thoughts on reading and thinking; believes that 'it is not so easy as people think to choose reading that really sets the mind to work and makes it grow'; however, since everyone is 'always... much "involved in matter' as Aristotle says', the world and our 'little petty interests are "too much with us", and anything that lifts us out of them is a gain'. The ability to be thus lifted is something he much values in people; it is not proportionate to talent - intellect viewed as an instrument'. Arthur Butler has it, and it is one of the things Henry likes in [E. A?]. Scott.

Remarks that his mother has not written to him lately, and that they have 'in a sort of way dropped out of correspondence'. Claims that it was not he who objects to gossip; asserts that he has always maintained that 'it was the only way most people [had] of exercising their minds really, originally, on moral and social questions'. Says he is certainly interested in the Ritchies [the family of William Ritchie]; wishes that his mother could see them 'and ascertain whether the interest is due to [his] very limited acquaintance with (feminine) human nature'; has met many families but 'never... with one that took [his] fancy like this'. Asks what she thinks of Mrs Gretton; thinks that she must be livelier than most Rugby people, but that 'she is to be taken "cum grano" '.

Reports that Macmillan won't say who wrote Ecce Homo [recently published anonymously by J. R. Seeley], but has promised sometime to ask twenty people to dinner including Henry and the author. Reports that Gladstone wrote to Macmillan 'a letter acknowledging a presented copy and calling it a "noble book".' Relates that some of the 'younger men', such as Myers, are 'tremendously stirred by it', but that Henry is 'not quite in the same way'; quotes Carlyle saying that 'man and his universe are eternally divine', and adds that the author of Ecce Homo 'means us to go further and credit what is now to us incredible. He may be right'.

Expresses surprise at Mrs Gretton preferring the eldest Miss Ritchie [Augusta], and declares that he does also, although he does not think most people would. Refers also to the second Miss Ritchie [Blanche], 'Cornish's betrothed', as 'more unworldly perhaps.' Declares that when he comes across girls who interest him he uses his opportunities with considerable eagerness, 'because they are necessarily so few.'

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that she wrote to Mrs [Blanche?] Clough, and that the latter sent it on to her sister-in-law [Anne Jemima Clough]. Mrs Clough tells her that 'through Mr. and Mrs. G. Butler she [her sister-in-law] has succeeded in inducing a Mr. Myers...to undertake to lecture once a week [on Italian history] to [these] schools in Liverpool', and that Mr Hales' services will not therefore be needed. Asks Henry to inform Hales of this development, and also to let him know that a similar scheme may be established in Manchester, where his services may be required. Describes the end of term at Rugby. Reports that Mr [Henry?] Brandreth dined with them the previous day, and that he regretted not having seen very much of Henry. States that they are all well. Does not know when William is coming, and hopes that Henry will be able to come by the time Arthur returns from his visits to London, Clifton and Cheltenham.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to James Bryce

Typewritten copy. Wants Bryce's aid 'in reforming mankind - especially the University of Cambridge'. They have at present 'no examination in History', and he and others think they should, and that it should be incorporated into the Law Tripos, 'after the Oxford model.' As an examiner in his Law and Modern History school, he would like Bryce to write him a letter on the subject. Adds that they shall probably make International Law as prominent as they can, because they have just founded a professorship and several scholarships in this subject. Asks if he has seen [F. W. H. Myer's poem] St Paul, which, he remarks, is 'very fine poetical rhetoric - consummate except for excess of artifice, and occasional lapses into bad taste and into startling vulgarity...which reminds one of Ebenezer.' Does not think 'any man living could have written it except Myers'. Has heard that Conington 'is writing a "Numquamne reponam" on classical education in the Contemporary [Review]', and they 'expect to be withered.'

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks him for sending [Roden] Noel's poems. Reports that Arthur has [James Russell?] Lowell's new volume and likes it very much. Claims that the amount of writing she had to do that term has prevented her from doing very much reading. Reports that she has not been able to do much about Fred Horton and his education, and that at present he is attempting some old Scholarship Examination papers, which she sent to him. Mentions St John's Foundation School at Clapton, and what Edward has told her about it.

Informs Henry that Arthur wishes him to know he will not now go abroad at Easter, as [Fred] Myers has taken ill and cannot go. Arthur thinks that he will go away as soon as he can. States that she will be very glad to see Henry either on 18 or 21 March, and Trevelyan if he comes any time between 18 and 25 March. Expects Edward, Minnie and their two eldest boys on 25 March, and states that Edward wants to go to Cambridge to finish some book that he is bringing out. Minnie is to stay in Rugby until he takes her to pay a visit to the Bishop of Hereford.

Regrets to hear that Henry has been suffering from strained nerves and sleeplessness, and suggests that he take a holiday. Admits to being a little worried about William because of his lack of correspondence since 29 January, and that she hears from Mr [Mandell?] Creighton that he has written to no Oxford friend since he left. Refers to Minnie's domestic problems. Asks to be remembered to Mrs Kingsley [?], and reports that Miss Temple has been very ill.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Undertakes to mention Myers' wishes in relation to the Moral Sciences Examination. Does not know 'who the other two [examiners] will be.' States that Mayor has been applied to. Is torn between 'a desire to get a good man and to do honour to the Tripos by getting a M. Sc. firstclass-man.' Says he 'quite accept[s Myer's] epithets for [D. G.] Rossetti's sonnets' which pleased him 'critically and classificatorily' since he discovered in Rossetti 'the "missing link" between Swinburne and Christina Rossetti'. Wishes Rossetti would write more.

Discusses Mozley's article on Modern poets in the Quarterly [Review], and claims that he is the first man 'who has spoken adequately of Clough.' Reports that there is a new edition of Clough in the press. States that he has not seen [Roden] Noel since he reviewed him. Remarks that 'that review has turned out unfortunate', and that '[R. H.?] Hutton likes the poems and therefore would have reviewed them...with his goldest pen.' Claims that he could not have said anything stronger in [Noel's] favour, and does not agree with Myers about the book. Declares that Markby 'is a little over enthusiastic about female prospects' and believes himself that 'the question is in a hopeful state.' Claims that 'there is no real conservatism anywhere among educated men.' Adds his opinion in relation to the use of 'esquire'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that he is resigning his fellowships after the next election, and intends to stay in Cambridge to lecture. Believes this to be 'a good thing on the whole - assuming that the College is not at present likely to take pains to get a really good teacher of Philosophy.' Explains why he had not taken such steps before. Asks what shall be said of the man 'who cares only for the highest things, and to those cannot attain?' [Note in Myers' hand: 'quotation from letter of mine to Noel. I was then a Christian.'] Tells Myers to read Ludibria Lunae [by W J Courthope], which is 'original and of it's [sic] kind masterly', and whose intellectual content is 'beneath contempt'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he shall not see Myers. Announces that he is probably to leave the Lakes on 1 September. Reports on the weather, and relates that they lunched 'on the Island' and saw some cousins [of Myers], 'especially Miss Theodosia', who quite impressed Sidgwick's mother. States that [G.O] Trevelyan is in Penrith, and that he is to be married in a month. Reports that Arthur 'is very exultant in Norway', and that he himself is to go to Cambridge 'to make ready the Batting against [Myers'] Bowling in November'. Hopes to see the latter then. Is unsure as to where he shall be living.] Reports that it is likely that he will get C.H. Pearson 'to lecture on History in Trin. Coll.' Asks if Myers liked Mrs Kitchener; declares that she is 'at Rugby somewhat of a symbol or a Banner.' Note [in Myers' hand]: 'I examined for the Moral Science Tripos in Nov/69. HS coached men for [ ]'

Letter from Janet Catherine Symonds to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that the reply to Sidgwick's letter to Johnnie has been sent back to her in Clifton by Storke, who was afraid of directing the post to Amsteg. Reports that Johnnie has been 'rained up in [Maderaner Tal?]' all that week, and would have been glad of receiving some post. Thinks that he is content, and reports that he likes his companions. Declares that Mrs Butler was at [Mürren], as was F. Myers, and around twenty other people. Gathers that the [Lee?] Warners 'were a bore, but that he liked the [F.E?] Kitcheners very much indeed.' Johnnie says that Mrs Kitchener reminded him of Lady Sabine. Refers to Sidgwick's loss of interest in the English hills, and urges him to forget that he has seen the Alps. Maintains that comparisons are odious. States that she was at Tintern the previous week, and suggests that this has perhaps given her a new love for the quietness of the English scenery.

Symonds, Janet Catherine North (1837-1913) author

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thinks that it would be difficult to find a replacement for Myers in the Moral Science Tripos [in which Myers examined]. Advises him to write to Sidgwick or some other member of the Moral Science Board as soon as he has made a decision. [Note in Myers' hand: 'I thought of going to Australia with the dying Ch[ ] Taylor']. Declares that he is curious to see [Alexander?] Macmillan. [Part of letter cut out and some words obscured at this point.] [Note in Myers' hand: Ludibria Lunae] In relation to Courthope, thinks that he should not have recommended Myers to read it. Claims that he did not write consciously as an advocate, and that the subject of the satire irritated him.

As regards [Roden] Noel, asserts that he wrote 'with a positively painful effort to be rigidly impartial'. Discusses his attitude to writing reviews: he never reviews anything 'which has not really interested [him], and which [he does] not think other people ought to read', while at the same time he 'feel[s] more in [his] element' when calculating appropriate amounts of praise and blame 'than when enthusiasm and sublime flights are wanted'. Suggests that if it be true that Myers cannot write a novel it is because he does not care enough 'about little things, and therefore [does] not observe them enough.' Asks Myers to tell him the author of Monsieur Madame et Bébé [book by Antoine Gustave Droz] when he writes.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Acknowledges receipt of two of Myers' letters, and declares that he was 'much delighted' with his praise. [Note in pencil: 're article on Clough'.] Claims that it ought to be fair, as he had taken pains to be precise in relation to the subject. Refers to Myers' accusation of Sidgwick 'praising too unreservedly' as a critic, saying that Myers is probably 'right generally' - though this does not come from 'kindheartedness' but from 'an instinct that catholicity is [his] line - but that he 'won't admit it in any particular instance'. Refers also to Courthope's work [Ludibria Lunae].

Discusses Myers' sonnets, which he enjoys, and makes some critical comments thereon. Remarks that the third one seems 'to combine to a great degree the exquisiteness of Tennyson with that of Christina Rossetti...' Undertakes to write again. States that he is 'busy canvassing for Jebb', and asks Myers to go up [to Cambridge] to vote for him on the following Tuesday week. [Note in Myers' hand: 'As Public Orator - Jebb was elected Nov. 2/69. I went up to vote.']

Letter from W. K. Clifford to Frederick Pollock

Trinity College, Cambridge.—Sends some lithographed notes on analytical geometry. Has been told that they cannot become Masters of Arts till next term. Jokes about Pollock's hat, and refers to Auerbach’s Spinoza, the new [edition of] Shelley, and Sidgwick's interpretation of one of Myers's poems.

(Marked 'Jan. 1870'.)

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Urges Myers to print his poetry, referring to some minor objection he has to some of the contents of the [two sonnets], which 'both seem faultlessly magnificent in composition.' Confirms that Mrs Venn is ill, and explains that that is why he is 'lecturing for V. on Logic.' Reports that when he last heard of [ ] 'there was reported no hope', and states that he has not heard for a day or two. Remarks that it will be very hard to replace him. Adds that he does not like the title [of the sonnets], and that the 'W. and S....are both so peculiar.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Refers to Myers' intention to write a poem addressed to Sidgwick 'de rebus divinis'. Claims that this would interest and gratify him, but wishes to make clear his religious views, of which he fears Myers is not completely aware. Claims that if Clough had not lived and written he [Sidgwick] 'should probably be now exactly where he was', and that he 'can neither adequately rationalize faith, nor reconcile faith and reason, nor suppress reason.'

In 'an irreligious age one must not let oneself drift, or else the rational element of oneself is disproportionately expressed and developed by the influence of environment, and one loses the fidelity to one's true self'; does 'not feel called or able to preach religion except as far as it is involved in fidelity to one's true self. Believes 'that religion is normal to mankind, and therefore take[s] part unhesitatingly in any social action to adapt and sustain it (as far as a layman may)'. Also knows that his own 'true self is a Theist', but 'believe[s] that many persons are really faithful to themselves in being irreligious', and does 'not feel able to prophesy to them'; any complaint he has against them 'is not that they do not believe in a God, but that they are content with, happy in, a universe where there is no God ; but many of them are not content, and to these [he has] nothing to say, not being able to argue the matter on any common ground'.

Claims not to feel 'the passionate personal yearnings' that Myers puts into his verse, though he is 'wrought to much sympathy' when Myers expresses them. States that he has read Myers' poems through again, and remarks on 'the combination of great freshness...of feeling with finished elastic stateliness of style.' [Note in another hand: 'Written from somewhere in Germany'].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that he intends to go to Cambridge on Sunday or Monday [2 or 3 October]. He will be 'engaged in arranging female education' that week, and the following week 'shall probably have one or two pupils.' Invites Myers to come. Refers to Rhoades's poems and to 'Buchanan's Book of Orm', both of which he gives his opinion of. Claims that the Spectator has treated Myers 'capriciously', and does not understand it. Adds that '[p]eople [at Rugby] seem still to cherish a Gallows in their souls.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Has received Myers' letter: would much like to come and see him at Cheltenham. Is going to Rugby for a week, and must be in Cambridge from 1 October, 'partly for ladies' lectures, partly to catch zealous pupils who are to be examined in November, and dialectically improve them before term begins.' Read Myers' poem Ammergau, in Macmillan's Magazine: it did not please him quite as much as 'the Roman poem', but he liked the close exceedingly.

Returned from Germany earlier than he had intended because of the [Franco-Prussian] war. Declares that his sympathies have turned round lately: 'there is something almost attractive about French conceit' and the image of a victorious German is unappealing. Fears that they shall miss each other at Rugby, and mentions that he may go down there again for a day or two if he finds the time, but envisages that they shall meet 'in town'. Offers to introduce him to [R. H.] Hutton. Remarks that 'the Spectator is not particularly good to write for as the editors do so much themselves'. [Note in Myers' hand: 'I thought at that time of taking to writing reviews'.]

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Urges Myers to 'come up [to Cambridge]'. Reports that 'there is a great scheme of tutorial reform, one part of which comes on for voting.' States that he shall be up examining for minor schools. Has come to the conclusion that the 'I. P. of I. [Myers' poem The Implicit Promise of Immortality] is exceedingly good', but thinks that 'a p[oem] in classical style as an ancient Topic should not be published in a Shilling Mag.'

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that '[C. H.?] Pearson is open to the offer about Saffron Walden', and wishes to hear details. Warns Myers not to come to Cambridge on 20 [November], unless he would like to meet the Ad Eundem (Society). Praises Myers' poem, but admits that he has not altogether made up his mind about it. States that he would like to hear more about the French Literature Scheme. Reports that [at Cambridge] they are 'thinking of nothing but war and academic reform.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets to say that he will not see William the following week. Reports that the latter has written to say that he does not feel well enough to come to the 'Ad Eundem'. Informs her that the marmalade has arrived, 'and is very nice.' Asks her to tell Arthur that they 'lost "the whole ticket" at the elections to Council.' Does not think that it will much matter, and states that '[t]he questions which are coming to the front now in Academic affairs are not of a party character.' Regrets to see that the same state of affairs does not exist 'in the metropolis: and that the worst features of Parliamentary Elections are to be introduced into the Elections of school-boards in the Metropolis'. States that he allowed his name to be put on Miss [Garrett]'s committee for Marylebone. Has learnt that the elections are to cost about £1,000 per candidate, and Miss [Garrett], 'standing on principles of peculiar p[ ] will only spend £500.' Adds that it is 'a terrible waste of money.' Reports that Trevelyan has been there 'in a very triumphant and anti-military state.' Quotes Seeley on opposition to a reform. Asks her opinion of Myers' last poem in Macmillan['s Magazine]. Thinks it 'very fine', and remarks that Myers' ability 'to write anything so like Pope shows great versatility of style.' Adds that he is glad that she liked Catherine Symonds.

Letter from R.H. Hutton to Henry Sidgwick

Asks if Sidgwick is going to ask Constables for us or are you waiting for [ n burk?]? He understands from [ ] would have sent it from [ ] [ ]. H. encloses a cheque for it [ ] Myers which [ ] many thanks and regrets that [ ] did it [ ]. He asks Sidgwick [ ] for [ ]

Hutton, Richard Holt (1826-1897) journalist

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he shall be delighted to write Myers' autobiography, but adds that he must see a good deal of him to do it well. Hopes that he is coming to visit soon. Remarks that Venn seemed to expect him 'in an official capacity' in the neighbourhood. Refers to Myers' letter, which he deems to be 'very interesting', and claims to be 'impressed by the tranquil objectivity of [his] descriptions.' [Part of the letter torn out at this point.] Declares that he feels terribly ignorant of the whole subject, and claims that he does not believe in deliberate choice in love. States that when he was 'young and erotion (cf. Clough)' he used to repeat to himself 'the end of Iphigenia's prayer (Goethe, favourite play of [his] for wholesome warning'. Quotes some lines.

Refers to Myers' work and inquires whether it leads to a permanency. Asks him to tell his [Myers'] mother that Sidgwick is '[temporarily] supplied with a President of [his] "Hall" ', Miss Clough having promised to start them; she is to come only for one or two terms, so Sidgwick is still looking for her successor, 'though more tranquilly'. Reports that he is now examining houses. Complains that '[t]his whole matter' takes up so much of his time, but believes that it is worthwhile. States that he is 'forced more and more into involuntary antagonism with Miss Davies', and reports that she wrote to him recently 'and mentioned affably that [he] was the serpent that was eating out her vitals.' Reports that he saw [ ] [deleted] 'the other day' in Cambridge, and now regrets 'that she could not come.' Declares that she is 'so very [ ] [ ]' [deleted], and understands why, under some circumstances she might strike some people as 'unconciliatory.' Sends greetings to Myers' mother, to whom he is very grateful for 'her exertions' on his [and others'] behalf. Refers to J.A. S[ymonds'] poem.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that a lady [Eliza Rhodes], with whom he is acquainted from his younger days when they were both 'in a Society for mutual improvement by means of correspondence' has written a paper 'on the Advisability of Educating Rural Young Women by means of Correspondence', and that the paper has been submitted to him. States that he has undertaken to try and organise 'a system of Education by Post, preparatory...for the C[ambridge] Examinations', and relating to [Cambridge] lectures. Wishes to ask Myers, as Superintendent of English for Home Study' what his colleagues and pupils are likely to think of this scheme, the main points of which he outlines.

Reports that he has just been staying with the Bibbys at Liverpool. Claims to enjoy talking to Miss Bibby, and does not 'at all dislike Mr and Mrs.' Declares that he wishes that 'people who do not read books would have always the courage of their unliterary convictions, like Jack Perkins of Downing College.'

Reports that he has been 'attending a North of England Council Meeting and making observations on women.' Remarks that they 'have not quite enough practical selfassertion at the right place and time, and hence are more apt to nurse small jealousies than men.' Declares himself to be 'in an ultra-philosophic humour', due to having mislaid his portmanteau. Reports that he is 'obambulating the Irish Channel, or circumambulating the Great [Orme's] Head, to keep off h[ay] f[ever].'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks Myers 'for the pamphlet', whose author Sidgwick wishes to discuss with him. While finding 'no attractive characteristicalness in her ideas, he is struck by 'the amazing quantity of her emotional impulsive force...' States that he is glad that Myers' 'plutological lines have fallen to [him] in pleasant places.' Refers to the questions raised by Myers, to which Sidgwick wishes to give an ethical solution. Adds that he always feels that he should like to be as many of 'the right sort of people' as possible. Reports that the headmaster - 'Stokoe, late of Richmond' - of the renovated grammar school at Reading has just called on him wanting a second master, 'mathematician to teach some science, salary £200-300 a year + a boarding house', and suggests that [Linnaeus?] Cumming might like it. Tells Myers to write to the latter if he thinks it worthwhile.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Discusses Myers' intention to take up medicine. Warns that it could be 'too great an investment of time and nervous energy. [Part of letter deleted by Myers?]. Remarks that there seems to be much to be said for the subject, but that it does not seem likely 'to lead to much poetry'. Of a poem by Myers about Alfred de Musset, remarks that he 'cannot quite divine the evolution of thought in the whole piece...' [A note in Myers' hand states that he put an end to the poem 'on the receipt of this criticism.' Announces that he intends to go to Hallsteads on the following Saturday for a day or two. States that his book is 'at a standstill. Reports that Roden Noel claims that 'all people whose taste has not been perverted by academic education regard him as Coming Poet', and so he can't stand Sidgwick anymore. [Partly deleted note by Myers refers to Roden Noel]

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Asks for information concerning Myers' coming to Cambridge, 'The Prospects of Poetry' and 'The Probabilities of Medicine etc etc'. Declares that they have much to discuss, Sidgwick having failed to write due to the unrealised expectation of seeing Myers at Rugby. Reports that he has to teach history that term, 'no successor having turned up to Pearson: and Cambridge breeding no historian'; they are 'thinking of taking some healthy young resident and locking him up with a Hume'; it is 'rather a disgrace to us that we all take so small an interest in the human race'.

Asks if he has seen Noel 'in the Dark Blue [a literary journal]'. Suggests that he may have been ashamed to send it to Myers, as 'some of the polemic is almost personal'. Declares that it is very well written, 'except the polemical part', and states that he writes better prose than verse. Reports that Noel nearly quarrelled with him 'for reluctantly avowing that [he] did not consider him an equal of Swinburne.' States that Noel 'thinks that the Verbal School (S[winburne?] Rossetti, etc - non sine te) have been found out'. Refers to the Edinburgh of July, and the Contemporary [Review] of October as having evidence to support this theory. States that Noel also thinks that 'Buchanan and R.N are going to be chaired instead by a mutable but at length appreciative public.' Refers to 'a certain Mutual Admiration league' between Noel and Symonds. Believes that Symonds's poetry could be successful, 'if he could only impassion himself about a good subject.'

Asks Myers to send his last epic. Tells him to read Noel's article. Sends his regards to Myers' mother. Announces that his second correspondence circular is soon to appear. Reports that Miss Clough is in Cambridge, that the house is 'getting on', and that there will be five [women] there that term.

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