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Myers, Frederic William Henry (1843–1901) psychical researcher and essayist
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Refers to [W.F.] Barrett's letter as 'a bore'. States that they must 'maintain the distinction between experimental work and collection of narratives, and between hypnotic and normal state'. Suggests that they appease Barrett by admitting 'the great advantage of having all the evidence set forth together from time to time by an able hand' and allow him to print his paper, provided it is not called a 'Report of the [ ] [ ] Committee.' States that he is writing to Gurney with this proposal. Adds that he intends to propose the Lord Rayleigh F.R.S. as Vice-President [of the Society for Psychical Research] at their next council meeting.

Letter from James S. Rutherford to Nora Sidgwick

Apologises for what he feels to be 'an apparent intrusion into matters too private and personal.' Explains that he has read Henry Sidgwick's works, such as The Methods of Ethics, Outlines of the History of Ethics for English Readers and Philosophy, Its Scope and Relations as a student of philosophy at Queen's College in Belfast. States that the first result of studying The Methods of Ethics was to fill him 'with a reverence towards the moral and intellectual nature of its author', and claims that there is no man to whose opinion on any question which he investigated he would attach so much importance and authority. Claims that the works also inspired another feeling in him 'one of a purely emotional nature, something, perhaps, akin to love, if that were possible towards one whom one has never met.' States that as the feeling has grown stronger he has wished to know more about Henry's life and character, but has only been able to secure two short biographical sketches - 'one in Bryce's Contemporary Studies, and a short obituary notice in Frederic Myers Fragments of Prose and Poetry'. Wonders whether a memoir might have been printed for private circulation and if so suggests that she might send it to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that what Myers has told him 'is certainly a relief', and claims that he shall now find it easier to tell those who have to be told, 'without saying anything about his insanity.' Refers to a séance, at which he, Nora, [Henry] Slade and Lankester were present, and which is the subject of some controversy. Thinks that Myers had better go, 'when Miss B[ibby]'s sittings are over, if nothing else turns up.' States that if Myers comes across anything good, he [Henry] will instantly come to town and go with him. Undertakes to send back Miss B[ibby]'s note the following day. Sends his regards to Myers' mother.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he and Nora are 'intensely interested' by Myers' letter. Claims that, taken in connection with their experience, 'the evidence for "spiritual [thoughtreading]" at least is strong in proportion to the improbability of unconscious self' on the part of both Nora and Myers. Does not think the evidence of identity strong, 'unless the statement about the M.S. turns out correct.' Claims that the long message seems 'vague; and the mention of Edward [ ] not very strong.' States that he has found it very difficult to think of questions to which Myers will not know the answers, but has put down some.

Letter from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick

Reports that the letters [from various correspondents to Henry Sidgwick] have all arrived, and that the Myers file are the best he has read. Declares that the latter 'evoked more and had more to give than any other correspondent' he has yet read, and were more valuable autobiographically 'than even the highly valuable Dakyns letters'. Includes a list of letters, with information such as the addressees and dates. Also includes a note 'To be added...' in Nora's hand.

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Claims to find Myers' verses 'very moving'. Goes on to list his objections in relation to its content. With regard to Sir B[ ], thinks it would be undignified to make an obvious effort to [ ] him, 'unless through some one who knows him personally.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Asks whether the 'I. of the S.' is proved or not. Wishes Myers to dine with him 'on Thursday at 7.15', and reports that his Anglo-Indian friends, the [Charles?] Bernards will be there, and he wishes them to hear Myers' 'additional evidence'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

In relation to Miss Brooke, declares that without being pretty, she is not ugly, and that her face 'shows feeling and intelligence when one looks close.' States however, that 'one has to penetrate a slight veil of dullness to see these qualities', and that 'there is not a particle of girlish attractiveness about her...' Asks Myers what he thinks of the proposal to tell Miss Clough that he [Myers] is a correspondent, and to arrange to go in some evening. In relation to the 'dear damsel', states that his experience of the correspondents [in the scheme for women's education] would not incline him to give a tragic interpretation to her silence. Refers to his own correspondents, who are all 'irregular and arbitrary in their ways, except one young strenuous well-trained governess in London, and the admirable and delightful Annie Thomas'. Announces that he is off to Rugby the following day, 'where the impending crisis [re headmaster Henry Hayman] still hovers. Invites Myers to breakfast on Sunday or Monday, 'and see one or two undergraduates.'

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - The hard weather has 'carried off quite a group of [Sir George's] old London friends', leaving the same sort of gap as was left in his college circle by the deaths of Bowen, [Henry] Sidgwick and Edward Young. Goschen, Davey, Godfrey Lushington, and Allendale ([Wentworth] Beaumont) have all died within about a fortnight. Caroline and Booa [Mary Prestwich] much enjoyed their visit to the Shiffolds and meeting Paul. Was very lucky not to break his hip; is still lame. The Lords have 'a reform bill of their own House'; the "Times" seems not to think this is the business of the Commons, which is 'all very well if the same theory is adopted reciprocally' but they threw out the Plural Voting bill last year.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that they are all going to London 'on the 6th', and he proposed to attend regularly from that time forward. Adds that he will come 'on the 4th', if Myers really wants him. States that five of them (including Lady Rayleigh and Nora) propose to attend 'from 6th to 17th, at Holland's invitation'. Reports that because he had not heard from him he 'concluded to put off Dakyns.' Reports that he has just heard 'the terrible news'. Asks Myers to write to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Is very glad to hear from Myers. Refers to his excuses about 'the stay of Capua'. States that he and Nora'shall be glad to hear about the Ghosts.' Invites him to Cambridge, and states that they shall be alone until 10 October. Refers to the 'Poem', which he describes as 'st[ ] and entertaining and pleasure-giving', but open to some criticisms, which he proceeds to set forth. Sends his kind regards to Myers' mother.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that a telegram has just arrived from Gurney to say that he will be [in Bradford] on Wednesday to begin investigations with Kershaw, the Southport Mesmerist. States that they have seen the Cl[ ] man twice, and professes to rather like him and think him honest, but reports that they have not got anything out of him yet, and is not very hopeful about his 'Clairvoyants'. Thinks, however, that he is worth trying further. Announces that they go to Sunderland the following day to see Ogle and his ' "[Dick]" '. States that he has looked up both the Leeds stories, and declares that [T ] is 'a very satisfactory person, but his story is slightly deteriorated by further information.' Finds that 'the other story's "William" is Dr G[ ]'s father', and he will write it out as he heard it from his father. States that it is not possible to find confirmation of the story, but that he has discovered 'that the "lecture of the eminent surgeon" was probably a paper before the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society' in April 1828 by William Hey. Thinks that the papers are still in existence, and has got Stephen Marshall to make enquiries. Announces that they return [to Cambridge] on the following Saturday or Monday. Hopes that Myers' family 'is in perfect wellbeing'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that on receiving Myers' 'excellent' news he 'went and settled with the P[etty?]s finally on the terms of Mrs P's last note.' Announces that they will probably come on 'Sat. 29th.' Announces tha the should be delighted to dine in [H]. Sq. on 13th if there is no séance', but asks ought they not to have [William?] Eglinton there. Says that he will dine on Wednesday wherever Myers likes, but doesn't particularly want it known that he is in town 'for this purpose', and therefore doesn't want the Savile [Club]. Adds that Gurney is 'ever so much better.'

Letter from M. A. Lewes (George Eliot), to Henry Sidgwick

States that she would be happy to see Mr Myers with him any Sunday. Claims that Sidgwick's judgment about what she does will always be a matter of interest to her. Maintains that she finds it difficult to undertake to represent 'the actions of those small but potent social conditions which have hitherto been most neglected by art.'

Cross, Marian (1819-1880) née Evans, author, pseudonym George Eliot

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Tells him to send him more letters [from the project providing education by correspondence to women?], as they are charming. Discusses Myers' poem, in terms of its grammar and tone. In relation to another, un-named matter, states that he echoes Myer's last words, and asks 'who is worthy?' Adds that 'Fawcett bemoans loudly [Myers'] taking the pay of the Govt.', and says that he 'might have been M.P. for BIRMINGHAM!!!!!'

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that 'Raper will probably be in Savile Club on Thursday at 1.30 for Lunch', and that he has promised to meet him there and to persuade Myers to come along. States that he shall probably arrive at 13 A[ ] St. about 11.15, but certainly not later than 1. Adds that Raper 'was at the Club, but made No Calls'.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that 'Prof B[irks]. decided Tuesday' [ie was elected Knightbridge Professor of Moral Philosophy at Cambridge], and claims not to care very much. Reports that he has seen Miss Brooke, with whom he had been corresponding, and reports that 'she is not so good as to make you put aside the idea of Miss Drew' to whom G[ ] H[ ] had introduced him.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Quotes an extract from a missive to him [from George Eliot], including an invitation to Sidgwick and Myers to lunch in Blackbrook, Southborough on 'Saturday the 4th', and gives directions as to arrive at Chislehurst by train. Sidgwick states that he shall very likely join the train at London Bridge, coming from Cambridge.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that 'Monday 16th to Wed 18th' would suit him and Nora 'excellently', except that he is occupied on Tuesday evening from 8.30 onwards. Asks him to write or telegraph if the above is not a reason for choosing other days, and Nora will write to Mr T[ ] immediately. Announces that they have room for Myers if he does not mind a very small room.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that they are going to stay a night in London, and are only passing through. States that he will go up early and see Myers between 12 and 1, before lunching with Nora. Suggests Albemarle or elsewhere, and asks if this would suit. States that he wants much 'audire et [ ] voce[s]'.

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Believes that Jebb, Myers and Maitland 'are desirable names.' Refers to the 'originators of the scheme who objected to having more than a few [and] when [Stephens] suggested Maitland doubted.' Announces his intention of sending to him at once and asking him to send on to Myers. Believes them to have a good set of names, and announces that he shall propose Maitland when he meets his collaborators. States that he is amused by the caution of Balfour and Lord Rosebery, who, he says, have both learnt to be afraid of commiting themselves to his creed. Thanks Sidgwick for his note.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks him for the warning. Explains that he has been detained longer where he is, and finds that he must go to Cambridge for a day or two to settle matters. States that he cannot come before '15th or 17th', but undertakes to come then, unless he receives a communiqué from Terling [home of Lord Rayleigh and his wife [Nora Sidgwick's sister] first. States that he will write decisively on Wednesday '[12th]', or will telegraph on Thursday. Adds that he will write again the following day, 'after hearing the decision of "Mr John Morley"' [who was reading the proofs of Sidgwick's The Methods of Ethics].

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Postcard. Announces that he will call at the Savile Club between 10 and 11 the following day, and will be with Myers at 2.30 at any place named in his note, and will be ready to dine with him 'in the evening anywhere.'

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Postcard. Tells him to '[s]end back Xmas R[ose]' States that he 'must write to the A_th_r', and asks Myers what he thinks of it. Invites him to 'COME UNTO THE YELLOW SANDS [ie at Margate; a slight mistranslation from The Tempest] on Monday 23rd', and tells him to bring his own philosophy.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that he thinks he need not dine at the Savile Club on Wednesday, and that he has arranged with [Charles Kegan?] Paul to 'drop in there about 6.15, see O[ ], and ask him to one séance', after which they can decide if they will go on with him. Tells Myers to arrange for him as he finds fitting.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Hopes he will come [to Margate], where Henry has been for a fortnight. Reports that 'Xmas Rose has come.' Refers to Myers' disappointment with the world. Announces that he is writing 'T_p_l D_p [ts] in sadness of heart'. Quotes some German verse. Reports that the 'Authoresses are gone abroad.' Asks if Myers would like to read Mrs Cornish's novel Alcestis, which he thinks 'a decided success.' Asks him to recommend some good novel 'that can be bought at a Carthaginian circulating Library.'

Letter from C. A. Elliott to Henry Sidgwick

States that he would have written last Autumn to inform him that his eldest son was going up to Trinity, and to ask him and Mrs Sidgwick to show him what kindness they could. Admits that it is now 'rather late in the day', but hopes that they might seek him out, as he [Elliott senior] would greatly value the Sidgwicks' friendship and advice to his son. Gives an account of the boy's activities since leaving school, and his time at Trinity, and expresses concern about his future. Reports that Fred Myers 'has been good to him'. With regard to his time in India, he reports that since he last saw Sidgwick he has had the post of Public Works Minister. Discusses the Department and the work it carries out, including canal construction throughout India. Mentions Sidgwick's efforts to revise the University's constitution and states that '[t]here is an undercurrent of sedition which has to be checked'. Expresses the desire to 'talk it all out with' Sidgwick. Mentions having read the Psychical Journal.

Elliott, Sir Charles Alfred (1835-1911) Knight, Indian civil servant

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks him for his letter. Declares his advice to be good, and states that he is disposed to adopt it. Quotes Alexander Pope: 'To err is human, to succeed Divine', and Francis I: 'Tout est sauvé [ ] l'honneur'.

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