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Symonds, John Addington (1840–1893) writer and advocate of sexual reform
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Copy letter from S. Schechter to J. G. Frazer

Beaumont House, Poole Road, Bournemouth. Dated 23 December 1910 - Thanks him for the new 'Golden Bough', admires how it sets one thinking about one's own subjects; is recovering from his illness; finds [John Addington] Symonds's book on the Renaissance very poor.

Letter from Horatio F. Brown to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that he is sending a packet of Henry Sidgwick's letters to her [not included] - two to [John Addington] Symonds, and the rest to his [Brown's] mother and to himself. Claims to have a good many more letters and memoranda 'full of that exquisite finesse of humour that was so peculiarly his', but that as they all relate to the ' "Life" of Mr Symonds' he doubts that they would be of use to Nora. Offers to send them to her if she wishes to have them. Hopes that she has found 'the Journal Letters.' Sends his mother's best wishes. List [in Nora's hand] of '[l]etters enclosed and copied', and their dates: to 'J.A.S', 'H.F.B', 'Mrs Brown and to 'H.F.D.',

Brown, Horatio Robert Forbes (1854-1926) historian

Letter from Horatio F. Brown to Nora Sidgwick

Sends her the letters from Henry Sidgwick to [John Addington] Symonds [not included], which he found among the latter's papers. Claims that he is sorry to part with them, but that she has every right to them. Confesses that he has kept back one, and offers to send her the original after he has taken a copy, but states that he would like to keep one original letter from Henry 'to Johnnie.' Referring to all of Henry' letter to him [Brown], claims that they were mostly about Symonds 'Life'. Remarks on the fact that in the letters he sends there are references to 'the Journal', and states that that really covered the larger part of their correspondence. Sends his mother's kindest regards. Note in Nora's hand refers to the letters accompanying this letter, and dates from 1881, 1889, and 1892, and states that she has compared copies with originals.

Brown, Horatio Robert Forbes (1854-1926) historian

Letter from Alice Johnson to Nora Sidgwick

Discusses the proofs of chapters two, three and four of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir, which she is reading a second time. States that she feels very strongly against cutting this part of the book down at all, as she believes that there is 'practically nothing...that one would not be very sorry to miss from it.' Refers to its 'interest and charm', and to Henry's sincerity and courage, as well as to 'his refusal to be satisfied either with a materialistic or merely abstract theory.' Estimates that the complete book would constitute 'two not very big volumes', and compares this to the size of other biographies, e.g., Tennyson's, J.A. Symond's, V[ ]'s letters, and Colvin's Letters of R[obert] L[ouis] S[tevenson]. Declares that the great variety of topics in the book will make it more interesting to more people. Adds that in reading the proofs she has marked things she thought to be misprints, and refers to some inconsistencies and inaccuracies. States that she is very anxious for a reference to Henry's letter 'about In Memoriam in Tennyson's Life' to be brought in somewhere in the work, and also that the account he wrote in Archbishop Benson's Life about his school days will also be included. Refers to Henry's interest in others, and in particular to a letter he wrote to her after her Tripos. Undertakes to try to send off the proofs of the second chapter the following morning.

Johnson, Alice (1860-1940) zoologist, psychical researcher

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Expresses his reluctance to involve the Society for Psychical Research with the Theosophic Society [by giving them the use of their room], and draws a comparison to their 'mixture with the C.A.S.' Does not, however, see how they can 'refuse the offer without giving offence. States that if Stone does object, he should agree. Voices his objection to bringing forward stories of premonitions, 'before [they] have got the Phantasms of the living off [their] hands.' Believes that the [ ] or d'Assier, 'enlivened with stories, will be enough besides experiments of [their] own'. In relation to experiments, believes that they 'certainly ought to make an offer to Bishop' and that 'if nothing is done Labouchère and the sceptics have the best of it'. Remarks that, having read Bishop's letter in the Times that day, he gets the impression 'that the man is a charlatan'.

Regrets to report that the household [in Davos Platz, Switzerland] is rather sad; that 'J.A.S[ymonds] is not well and there is great anxiety about Janet, whose state is very critical'. Reports also that there are 'great searchings of heart as to the wisdom of having burnt ships and built [in] this strange and [ ] land'. Hopes that Myers feels 'in the "right way" as an F.T.S'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks him for his letter. Thinks that he must come back [to England from Switzerland]. Explains that he has agreed to put his name on the Unionist Liberal Committee, and would feel that he 'had not acted up to [his] principles' if he did not turn up to vote [in the General Election]' Requests him to send a telegram 'as soon as the day is known', and gives directions in relation to the address to which it should be sent. Reports that they are having a good time, and that J A. S[ymonds] and his three younger daughters are well. States however, that 'they have hardly any hope' in relation to Janet [Symonds' eldest daughter, very ill with tuberculosis].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks him for the report, 'which is going to be pasted in'. Reports that Symonds has written him 'a cheerful letter', with the news that 'the doctor holds out hopes of a cure when the winter is over.' Also states that Symonds asks Sidgwick to tell Myers 'that he now understands, and hopes he will write'. Adds that a clergyman from Girton called at his house, hoping to find Myers; 'it being so much pleasanter to settle things by a Personal Interview'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he and Nora cannot go to Cheltenham as his brother William and his wife are due to visit them, and then they are to go to the Symonds'. States that they must put off their arrival at Newcastle 'till the 2d: in order to s[ ] a day at Lincoln'. Reports that Edward White Benson is to be the new bishop of Truro. Asks Myers how he has got on with D[ ] 'in the intervals...of reading Mahaffy's reply!' Asks him to tell him 'how Jebb takes it'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he shall be delighted to write Myers' autobiography, but adds that he must see a good deal of him to do it well. Hopes that he is coming to visit soon. Remarks that Venn seemed to expect him 'in an official capacity' in the neighbourhood. Refers to Myers' letter, which he deems to be 'very interesting', and claims to be 'impressed by the tranquil objectivity of [his] descriptions.' [Part of the letter torn out at this point.] Declares that he feels terribly ignorant of the whole subject, and claims that he does not believe in deliberate choice in love. States that when he was 'young and erotion (cf. Clough)' he used to repeat to himself 'the end of Iphigenia's prayer (Goethe, favourite play of [his] for wholesome warning'. Quotes some lines.

Refers to Myers' work and inquires whether it leads to a permanency. Asks him to tell his [Myers'] mother that Sidgwick is '[temporarily] supplied with a President of [his] "Hall" ', Miss Clough having promised to start them; she is to come only for one or two terms, so Sidgwick is still looking for her successor, 'though more tranquilly'. Reports that he is now examining houses. Complains that '[t]his whole matter' takes up so much of his time, but believes that it is worthwhile. States that he is 'forced more and more into involuntary antagonism with Miss Davies', and reports that she wrote to him recently 'and mentioned affably that [he] was the serpent that was eating out her vitals.' Reports that he saw [ ] [deleted] 'the other day' in Cambridge, and now regrets 'that she could not come.' Declares that she is 'so very [ ] [ ]' [deleted], and understands why, under some circumstances she might strike some people as 'unconciliatory.' Sends greetings to Myers' mother, to whom he is very grateful for 'her exertions' on his [and others'] behalf. Refers to J.A. S[ymonds'] poem.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Refers favourably to one of Myers' poems. Discusses its form and content; remarks that there is 'nothing of the "tameness" ' in it that he perceived in Myers' last, and that he seems 'to have dropped the grave mature simplicity [which] Symonds etc admired so much in the last'. Refers to Goethe, whom Myers quotes in the work. Claims not to understand 'the last paragraph before the rhapsody', and states that he has 'jotted down a sort of abstract of the poem up to that point' to show Myers how it puzzles him. Announces that he would be happy to go to Eton for a few days after Easter, and that in Passion Week he intends to be vaccinated 'for the sake of mankind.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Asks for information concerning Myers' coming to Cambridge, 'The Prospects of Poetry' and 'The Probabilities of Medicine etc etc'. Declares that they have much to discuss, Sidgwick having failed to write due to the unrealised expectation of seeing Myers at Rugby. Reports that he has to teach history that term, 'no successor having turned up to Pearson: and Cambridge breeding no historian'; they are 'thinking of taking some healthy young resident and locking him up with a Hume'; it is 'rather a disgrace to us that we all take so small an interest in the human race'.

Asks if he has seen Noel 'in the Dark Blue [a literary journal]'. Suggests that he may have been ashamed to send it to Myers, as 'some of the polemic is almost personal'. Declares that it is very well written, 'except the polemical part', and states that he writes better prose than verse. Reports that Noel nearly quarrelled with him 'for reluctantly avowing that [he] did not consider him an equal of Swinburne.' States that Noel 'thinks that the Verbal School (S[winburne?] Rossetti, etc - non sine te) have been found out'. Refers to the Edinburgh of July, and the Contemporary [Review] of October as having evidence to support this theory. States that Noel also thinks that 'Buchanan and R.N are going to be chaired instead by a mutable but at length appreciative public.' Refers to 'a certain Mutual Admiration league' between Noel and Symonds. Believes that Symonds's poetry could be successful, 'if he could only impassion himself about a good subject.'

Asks Myers to send his last epic. Tells him to read Noel's article. Sends his regards to Myers' mother. Announces that his second correspondence circular is soon to appear. Reports that Miss Clough is in Cambridge, that the house is 'getting on', and that there will be five [women] there that term.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Explains his failure to write to Myers lately; he has been involved in 'memorializing Gladstone: entreating him to investigate and reform [Cambridge University] without unnecessary preludes and prefaces.' Reports that they collected one hundred and ten signatures, but that it fell to him, who has come to be regarded as 'Perpetual chief clerk and servant of all work' of the Liberal Party in Cambridge, to collect them. Declares that he thought Myers' circular 'excellent'. [Note in Myers' hand explains that the circular is of the Corresponding Society; 'Cambridge men teach young women [by] correspondence. Each sent out a circular to his pupils.'] Tells Myers to estimate his expenditure of time and trouble on the project.

Thanks him for [James] Saumarez' letter, which disposes him to accept Jebb's insight that Saumarez' nature resembles Myers'. [Notes in Myers' hand: 'I hope there is some truth in this', and 'letter later forthcoming - consisted principally of good advice....'] Announces that Arthur is to come [to Oxford] the following day. States that now that [Arthur and others] 'have got their Board ['the "promising Body" ', according to Myers], the puzzle is how to fashion it into an offensive [a reference to Arthur Sidgwick and other masters at Rugby's struggle against the head of the school, Henry Hayman].'

In relation to the women installed in Cambridge under his scheme for female education, whom he refers to as his 'Garden of Flowers' [referred to by Myers as Sidgwick's 'harem or collection of girls reading at Cambridge'], reports that 'Miss Kennedy yearns to attend Wards (Clough) Catholic ritual by herself on Sunday night, and [Sidgwick and others] refuse...' Predicts that 'Restraint of Liberty' for the women will be a problem in the future. Refers also to 'Emily Davies and the inevitable complication of educational machinery'. Announces that he intends to go to J.A. Symonds 'on the 26th', and is glad that he will also see Myers.

In relation to Middlemarch, claims that he feels he could have planned the story much better: does not think that the 'Dryasdust hero [Casaubon] need have been more than, say, thirty-five, and he might have had an illusory halo of vague spiritual aspirations; the ending could have been made just as tragic'. Says 'the style is the finest intellectual cookery'.

Praise Myers' 'French verses', and asks how he does them; he himself could not, despite having had 'the finest classical education'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that 'S[ymonds]' is with him [in Freshwater]. Refers to 'the matter' of which Myers knows [Symonds' homeoerotic poetry, as per information contained in a paragraph that has been crossed out in ink].

Admits to finding it very difficult to answer Myers' letter, feeling that he expects 'not so much sympathy, and certainly not Hortation... but Strictest Science' and principles of conduct arising from science. Remarks on Myers' perceived insistence on certainty in answers. Claims to have 'as much sympathy... as it is possible for one in whom Egoism and altruism are combined so differently.' Discusses his and Myers' differences in character. Declares that 'Victorious Analysis paralyses impulse...', and that the two difficult thing that must be done are 'to choose in a certain spiritual twilight and obscurity, the noble and the good and refuse the evil and base: and... to make Will and rational purpose supply the place of impulse.'

Reports that they have seen 'the Laureate who was tres bon and recited to [them] Boadicea'; writes out the scansion Tennyson gives to some words in the poem. States that S[ymonds] has urged him to tell Myers 'that May Princess is positively the Loveliest Girl etc'; declares that he agrees. [Note in Myers' hand saying he thinks that this letter 'is the most interesting' he ever received from Sidgwick].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Explains that he cannot come [to see Myers], as his work on university reform has taken up his time, and he is behind in his work. In relation to 'the "project" ', claims that he was shaken out of the dream in London in the summer. Says that he had nearly succeeded in reconciling himself to science, when Myers' letter set him 'spinning again'. Would like to see him at Christmas, but is unsure as to whether he can allow himself 'the pleasure of a regular visit.' Explains that he has promised to go to [J.A.] Symonds some time, 'coinciding with [the Hill?] Greens', but that his plans are vague at present. Reports that there is no news from Rugby, and states that 'to say that it is in the agony of a crisis is only to say that H[enry] H[ayman] still hangs up his hat in the schoolhouse'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Refers to their recent conversation, and clarifies his and Nora's plans in relation to holidays, and their possible visit to her. Explains that they intend to go to the Alps for the end of June and the beginning of July if Nora finds 'that she can miss the Higher Level Examination without neglect of duty'. Mentions that that destination 'is the only complete cure for hayfever', and adds that they would be the guests of the Symondses, 'who are in permanent exile at Davos.' States that if Nora cannot miss the examination, they will go to visit Minnie and Edward from 13 to 18 June, and that they shall be able to make up their minds early in May, after Miss Gladstone has returned. Also discusses the possibility of Nelly [Benson] being sent to Newnham College, and Henry's views in relation to such a move.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Presumes that she is travelling about, and that his letter will be somewhat delayed in coming to Davos. States that he has explained this to Symonds, and asks her to send it on as soon as she can. He and Nora hope that she had a good time at Bamborough, 'and that everybody is revived and refreshed'. Asks if she has read Dorothy Forster, a historical novel by [Walter] Besant about the rising of 1715; says that it is 'fairly good'. Announces that he is going to spend Sunday with Mrs Arnold at Lowestoft.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie kept her well-informed about Henry when at Lincoln, and that his own letter told her more. Refers to his activities with regard to his lectures and book. Asks him to go to Rugby around Christmas, 'when A[rthur] S[idgwick] wishes to assemble [them] for his house warming.' Adds that Minnie and Edward cannot go because their boys will just have arrived home from school. Expresses a strong wish that he should come to Oxford. Adds that Mr Green has been asking her when Henry is coming. Reports that William and Isabel are recovering from colds. Asks if he had told her that Captain and Mrs Go[ ] lived at Cambridge, and asks him to send her the address of Mrs Go[ ]'s sister Be[ ]. Informs him that his godson Willy [Longsden] 'has been doing better lately + is promoted to a "Top hat" ' at Merchant Taylors' school.

Reports that the Committee of the Association for the Education of Women at Manchester have asked Miss Cannan to be Secretary 'for that [work] where she lives - [ ] Prestwick.' Suggests that Miss Clough might like to be informed of this. Claims that she is 'still in rather a mess with carpenter + masons + painters to follow.' Adds that she has two comfortable beds to offer to friends, and tells him to bear it in mind if he wishes to go to Oxford. States that William and Isabel would be pleased to see him [and Nora] and that Mr Green and his wife always have a welcome for him. Reports tha the Symondses have come home from Switzerland. Reports that Edward Sidgwick wrote to her to tell her another daughter of his was born some weeks previously. States that he was much interested in what Henry had to say about spriritualism, and that their friends the Cooksons told them that Henry was at the Lakes and talking on the subject.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks him for his last letter, which she found very interesting. Reports on the situation of the Horton family, who include six children and a sick father. Refers to three of the children - Alice, Frank and Lucy - and to their occupations and incomes, and to the fact that his father wishes Frank to be prepared for the Indian Civil Service 'as likely to afford the best maintenance for himself, and assistance to the family hereafter', but that his salary is not sufficient for this purpose. Refers also to the three younger children Rose, Marian and Fred. States that the family are getting into debt, and that that they could not pay for any portion of Fred's education, even if he were to get a scholarship, and that Mr Horton's chance of getting pupils has decreased since the appearance of Malvern College. Asks Henry's opinion on whether they should contribute to the boy's education, and suggests that the older son will also need some assistance when he leaves his present employment. Adds that the latter is known to the former headmaster of Christ's Hospital, Dr Jacob. Refers to Mr Horton's plans to move southward on account of his health, and his difficulty in finding pupils.

Reports that she received a letter from William, who wrote from Mentone, saying that he hoped to reach San Remo, Genoa, Florence and Rome in the following days and weeks. Refers to his enchantment with the country, and to his ascent of the Berceau and M[ont] Agel. Reports that he met Colonel and Mrs Ogilvie at Nice. Sends Minnie's best love to Henry, and her gratitude for his letter. Reports that she and Edward went to see Mr Cubitt at Denbies the previous Friday on their way from Brighton, when she [Mary Sidgwick] came to look after the children at Wellington College. Adds that Edward and Minnie also went to London for a few days. Announces that she intends to go home around 5 February, and suggests that Henry will be able to write to her there, and asks to be remembered to Mr Symonds if the letter reaches him at Clifton.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Lottie Leaf to Nora Sidgwick

Writes on the death of Henry Sidgwick to express her sympathy to Nora on her loss. Refers to Walter [Leaf] having written [see 101/48], and assures her that they both have wished that they might help her in any way that they could. States that she always remembers Henry 'with the same deep reverence and trust and admiration.' Refers to '[t]hose happy days at Am Hof' [the Symonds's house at Davos], and declares how good it was to know him and what a difference his friendship made to her father's life out there. Asserts that Nora's life joined to Henry's appears to her 'one of the best instances to give [one] hope of a future life, which shall be infinitely better.' Likes to think 'that those who stand so near now will see light together hereafter.' States that she will always remember 'the brave spirit of love and trust' which she saw in the Sidgwicks the previous May in London. Is thankful to have known him, and prays for God's blessings on Nora.

Leaf, Charlotte Mary (1867-1934) née Symonds, wife of Walter Leaf

Letter from Janet C. Symonds to Nora Sidgwick

Refers to Henry's letter to Katharine, which induced her to write to Nora and Henry, 'just to feel in touch with [them] both.' Declares that she loves them both dearly, and thinks about them constantly. Reports that three days previously H.F. Brown sent her Henry's letter 'to him, dictated to Graham Dakyns...' Wishes that they both could have come out to Switzerland again, 'just as in the old days!' Recounts her memories of the Sidgwicks' last visit there, when the latter were 'just fresh from [their] [Hyères] visit', and the wonders of their latest mediums, '[not yet proved fraudulent]'. Laments that now 'the last of the children will soon be gone too', and that his world in the past few years 'has been shrinking at an appaling rate'. Claims that the Sidgwicks were her favourite visitors, and refers to how 'Johnnie' [John Addington Symonds] loved the talks he had with Henry, and how he made point of keeping his letters. Hopes to see them both in the autumn, when she intends to go to England. Asks Nora who will do her work at Newnham, as she assumes that she could not stand the social strain of it now.. Reports that their house is full now, with Madge, her husband and baby, Walter Leaf, and others. Announces that Katharine is to go to England in three weeks, and in two months will be married, the idea of which, she claims, she has yet to get used to. Refers again to Henry's letter to Katharine. States that she hopes that 'C[harles] F[urse] is worthy of all the believing love of which she [Katharine] is making him the centre.' Prays for God's blessing to be upon the Sidgwicks.

Symonds, Janet Catherine North (1837-1913) author

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Has just been with Nora, who has returned from Paris. The 'Secret [of their future marriage] may be now considered altogether public', as Nora has told all her relatives. Tells her that she may tell who she likes. They are going to Nora's brother-in-law's house in Essex [Terling Place, home of John William Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh] the following day, and states that he will probably make that place his 'headquarters' until about 10 January. Will be in London on 4 January for a night, and probably another night in the same week. If his mother has to be in London after 10 January, she will find them all - Nora, Henry, Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick, H.G. Dakyns and J.A. Symonds - there.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mrs Clough

Typewritten. Regrets that he cannot put into his review [of A. H. Clough's Remains, for the Westminster Review] any notice of Symonds. Explains that the rule he tries to observe in anonymous writing is to write always of people exactly as he should do if he knew nothing of them. Since he hardly speaks of the edition at all, it would not be natural for him even to mention Symonds. In relation to another point that Clough had asked him about, states that he has altered a sentence in which refers to Mr Palgrave's preface to an edition to Clough's poem, and quotes it as it now stands, claiming that it is 'a very mild retort for the poem in the Spectator'. Refers to the death of his friend J.B. Payne. Hopes that Clough's children enjoy themselves on the Tenby sands, where he himself used to play nearly thirty years previously.

MS note by Nora Sidgwick: 'This letter did not reach us till the biography was printed off'.

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that he had hoped to be first to come to the M[etaphysical?] the previous night, where he and Sidgwick 'might have snatched a moment...to settle the point raised in [Sidgwick's] note' of nine days previously. Failing an interview, has decided to write regarding the matter. States that he has read Sidgwick's piece 'pretty carefully', and thinks that the general public, in consideration of his 'effective and interesting treatment of the questions between Leslie and Lowe, will allow themselves to be tempted into the severer matter of the definitions.' Believes his piece to be suited to the readers of the Fortnightly Review, and will give to students of economics a subject to reflect upon. Suggests that the short paper 'What is Money?' should be published as the 'next instalment'. Refers to the fact that Leslie might wish to reply to Sidgwick's paper. Reports that he has spoken to the [Rector] about the [Athenaeum] Club, and is awaiting his reply. States that he admires 'the Virgil' much, and observes that 'Myers seems...to have true literary faculty, as [Symonds] has, or Church', and asks why he does not produce more.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to be 'rather struck by the notion of asking Symonds to undertake W.S [William Shakespeare?].', and intends to talk it over with his [publisher? ] one day that week. Thanks Sidgwick for putting so good an idea into his head. Regrets that it seems that 'the chances of a free Sunday are faint.'

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from F.W.H. Myers to Henry Sidgwick

Copy of letter. Thanks Sidgwick for 'the very great pleasure' which Sidgwick's article on [A.H.] Clough has given him. Describes how he had read it in the W[estminster] R[eview], and had written to Symonds to ask whose it was. Declares it to be 'as good a critical essay' as he had ever read, and 'worthy to take a permanent place in English literature.' Hopes to read similar articles in the future. Warns him of the danger of being led 'to admire what is not admirable' and to add his 'more potent voice to the general chorus of the praises of twaddle and folly.' Refers to Sidgwick's article on Courthope's book [Ludibria Lunae], and illustrates the meaning of his warning with an analogy involving Myers and Sidgwick walking in the street and the former dragging the latter along 'after some dressed-out shop-keeper's daughter with a certain prettiness', who he tries to get to walk along with them.

Myers, Frederic William Henry (1843–1901), psychical researcher and essayist

Letter from Edward Lear to Henry Sidgwick

Writes that John [Symonds?] has sent him Sidgwick's name for two copies of his new book [Journal of a Landscape Painter in Corsica]. Asks him to let him know if he should send them to him at Trinity College. Also asks him to do what he can 'to cause other victims to sacrifice themselves at the Altar of Corsican topography'. Would be grateful for any additions to his list, 'which will be kept open till the book is out, about 1st of December.'

Lear, Edward (1812-1888) landscape painter and writer

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Hopes 'to be back in 80 days'. Asks about the possibility of postponing his lecture from May to the following October, but states that if Sidgwick has any difficulty in procuring a substitute, he will fulfil the original engagement. Claims that he pleased to hear of another edition of Sidgwick's book. States that although he doesn't agree with it on many points, he owes a great deal to it. Wishes that Sidgwick 'could get the freewill problem fairly put in a box!' Reports that he has given Sidgwick's message to Symonds, who 'seems to be going on with remarkable steadiness and to be for him in good health.'

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Janet Catherine Symonds to Henry Sidgwick

States that she was glad to receive his letter, and also to receive one that came from H.F. Brown at the same time. Agrees that the latter 'is remarkably tolerant of criticism', and remarks on the difficulty of his task. Reports that the proofs 'have now come in up to the opening of the second volume [of the biography of John Addington Symonds compiled by Brown from his letters and papers]', and expresses her relief that Sidgwick and Mrs Green are to revise them. Agrees with Horatio 'that to Bowdlerise these letters till all colour of individuality is gone - would be untrue to the subject and unfair to the readers', and maintains that the question of suppression is one of degree. Does not agree that all allusions to ill-health should be suppressed, and hopes that the 'Harrow part' in the first volume can be amended. Refers to the bad weather that they have been experiencing of late, 'and now a change to glorious October.' Reports that her cat, [Quasjee], has knocked over her inkstand and has left a paw-print on the already addressed envelope. Has decided to send it on as it is, though admits that it is more in Francis Galton's line than Sidgwick's. Reports that [Mrs] Greg has written that she is going with Walter to stay at the Hunter's Lodge, and asks Sidgwick to make friends with her. Send her love to Sidgwick and Mrs Sidgwick, and refers to there visit to her in Davos-Platz as 'the pleasantest thing that has happened' to her that year.

Symonds, Janet Catherine North (1837-1913) author

Letter from Janet Catherine Symonds to Henry Sidgwick

Suggests that he come to visit them about 28 December for four or five days. Explains that Johnnie could not go away before that. Sympathises with him about photographing. Reports that Johnnie is better than he has been for weeks. Expresses her sympathies in relation to the 'revolution' at Rugby [the departure of the headmaster Frederick Temple?]. Sends her love to Sidgwick's mother, and asks him to tell her how sorry she is for her. Reports that they have had Mr Myers with them a good deal during the autumn. She 'cannot help wondering always if he will "last"...in Mr [Conington]'s sense of the word.' Reports that Dr Symonds is ill again, but hopes that it is just a temporary relapse.

Symonds, Janet Catherine North (1837-1913) author

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