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Trevelyan, Sir Charles Philips (1870–1958) 3rd Baronet, politician
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Good to hear from Elizabeth [about Ravello]; sure 'the two elderly gentlemen' will be pleased to have them at meals; hopes she does not walk alone in 'very wild parts' because of 'wild dogs and uncultivated natives'. George has had his friend Robertson to stay and has just 'walked him off to Reedsmouth' in a downpour to meet his bag and go on to Carlisle. Has been busy with last arrangements and interviews; they leave by the early train on Thursday. Booa [Mary Prestwich] has left for Welcombe today. Sir George has been well recently but has just got a cold. Glad Elizabeth is going on with the translation, and looks forward to reading it; always thinks it 'foolish to spend time in translating french books, as everyone can read french', but very few people read Dutch. '[V]ery cheerful that the Liberals have 'won the Newmarket [by]election most triumphantly' [candidate Charles Rose]. Charles has not yet returned from Scotland; seems to be having a good time. Asks to be remembered to Mrs Reid and Madame Palumbo; asks if 'the old man at the Capucini at Amalfi' is still alive.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Rome. - Has read Elizabeth's letter again, and sees that she needs to get 'some little establishment in Kensington' so Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] will be no use. Suggests asking Imogen [Booth?] and Maud, who may have a friend willing to let a little flat; hears lodgings in London are 'very trying'. Thinks it would be good for Julian, who 'knows only too well how important he is' and has tempers; asks if Elizabeth could get Dr [Carter?] to visit when he is upset to see if it has a physical cause. Mary [George and Janet's daughter] was much improved in temper when less in the nursery; thinks clever children need more to occupy themselves and therefore would suggest a 'nursery governess'. Charles visited the Montessori schools here and was impressed, though he thought success 'depended on the teacher'; suggests that Elizabeth go and see the class. Does not think they can get to England before 20 January. Reminds Elizabeth how bad the [London] fogs are that month. Returns to the letter next day, reporting that the doctor thinks she is getting on very well. They will only stay a night or two at Grosvenor Crescent; tells Elizabeth to contact Booa [Mary Prestwich], who is there now.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Julian is well; he says Wallington is 'a nice warm little house' whereas the Shiffolds is cold. He has gone to Cambo this morning; Charlie arrived yesterday and Mary, who was staying at Wallington, has gone home with him. Hopes Elizabeth's guests [Catherine Abercrombie and her baby?] are well and do not give her trouble. Asks if Robert is returning soon; he will find it dreary where he is if it rains. Sir George is well and very busy; good that his book is done. Graham has made Julian a 'little besom to sweep the leaves with'. Thinks Mrs Evans is good with him, but 'she is a talker'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

[headed notepaper] Secretary for Scotland, Dover House, Whitehall. - Robert's letter interested him very much and pleased him and Caroline. No need to settle anything until he hears from Mr Verrall, but is anxious only 'to do what is best for [Robert's] happiness and usefulness' and is not 'wedded to any plan' which his heart is not in; thinks people who have proved their right should have a choice in their own careers, and Robert has stated his case very well. Charles has been elected unanimously to Brooks's, which is 'the most formidable ordeal of the sort in London'; the Unionists were 'very kind and friendly about it'. A postscript notes that Sir George has sent the forty pounds and eleven shillings to Mortlocks [bank].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Sorry to miss seeing Julian and Ursula; hopes they will have a good time at [?] Grunnock. He and Bessie had a good time at Wallington. Has not yet 'carried off the Botticelli Dante drawings' [see 12/28], though spoke to Charles; he was 'quite nice about it' though Bob thinks he rather likes the book being there. Has taken measurements to see if it will fit on the shelves at the Shiffolds, which he doubts; doesn't want to put it out on a table, and wonders whether Julian would like to have it in London. It had better stay at Wallington for the moment. Bessie comes home tomorrow, but will probably go to Wallington again in September. Wonders whether Julian has seen [Maria] Germanova again, and if he has found out if she is having difficulties with her rent. [Hasan Shahid] Suhrawardy has written him a 'disconsolate letter'; seemed to think it was unlikely he could come to Europe this year. Hopes to see Julian when he comes South. He and Bessie are probably visiting the [Donald] Toveys at Hedenham around the 25th. Thinks Bessie is 'very well'; she takes her breakfast in bed at half eight; Julian will have to have the '8 o clock breakfast at Wallington' if he goes there.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan and R. C. Trevelyan

Cadenabbia. - Got engaged this morning to Janet Ward. Everyone 'who is most nearly concerned is very pleased', and when they meet her Elizabeth and Robert will be no exception. The wedding will not be until next spring, and the news will be a secret for a month or so; they can, however, ask his parents and Charles more about it and about Janet since he himself must be away for the next three weeks. His housemates Hilton Young and Robin Mayor also know about it, as do 'dear Theo [Llewelyn Davies] and Booa [Mary Prestwich]'. He and Janet are very much in love.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. Thinks Georgie is 'quite happy'. Has talked to Mr Cole about a [cricket] bat, who thinks Robert would do best with a '12s 6 d.' one from Lillywhite's. There is going to be a match with a new school at Bracknell belonging to Mr Maresfield. Is 'getting on very well' with Euclid. Tomlin is 'top of his class this week'. Hopes Charlie is doing well. Georgie says he forgot to thank her 'for the bit about Wolseley, it was very interesting'. Hears 'Lord Suddley is dead'. 'Accounts done'. Robert sends his mother the [school news?] paper.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry that Elizabeth is having so much trouble with Julian; expects he 'likes his old nurse best', and resembles Robert in not being able to 'bear a change'; unlucky that he is also unwell. Elizabeth need not worry about deciding whether they should visit Wallington yet. It is very cold, but the house is warm and comfortable; perhaps the doctor should be asked if the change of air would be good. Hopes C[harles] and M[ary] will cheer her up - they will be 'excited about politics' - and that Elizabeth will be able to keep Nurse Catt a while longer so that things can settle. Sir George is anxious that she should not feel 'bound' to come to Wallington. Sees that '[Bessie's] old Judge is ill, & his old Report coming out!'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Has looked through three volumes of the "Yellow Book" and agrees with Robert that there is 'a certain collective energy and enthusiasm' which makes all the contributors 'do more vigourously [sic], or at any rate more oddly, what they regard as their ideal'; [Henry] James's two stories are very strong; [Walter] Sickert's illustrations 'most curious - in a way better than Beardsley'. The Charles Adamses, 'a pleasant couple', are staying; he is enthusiastic about going on to Flodden; he is seventy one, and his great grandfather [John Adams] was 'deeply interested in the world' up till the age of ninety. Charles Adams has seen bigger battles than Flodden, and was 'asleep in his saddle during Pickins's [sic: Pickett's Charge] at Gettysburg'. The 'Cambo folk' [Charles and Mary] are coming for lunch, with the [Malcolm?] Macnaghtens and 'all the babies'. In a postscript, notes that he has had another letter from [Theodore] Roosevelt, with 'three new spellings'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad they can hope to see Elizabeth; thinks it is the best thing, especially as she is keeping Nurse Catt, which is very good news; the other nurse cannot have been very clever or she would have made friends with [Julian]. Charlie calls him 'a superb little chap'; he and Mary will be glad it is settled. Asks Elizabeth to tell Nurse Catt how glad she is she is staying, and that the north country air will do her good. Asks her to let Maria know when to expect them [at Grosvenor Crescent]; discusses travel arrangements. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter [Alice?] are visiting on the 24th, and some neighbours are coming to dinner, but otherwise they will be quiet. Geordie [George Lowthian Trevelyan] has recovered from chickenpox and the girls show no sign of it yet; they have not been to Wallington so Julian will be safe. Politics is very exciting; was 'very glad the Conference failed'. Elizabeth's Dutch paper has begun to arrive. Sure she has done the best thing about the nurse, even if Mrs Catt only stays a few months. Good for the Liberal party to have the R[ussell] Reas at Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst]; fears Elizabeth cannot fight the seat this time. Asks Elizabeth in a postscript to send a telegraph with their arrival day, as she may want to go to Newcastle.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Intended to send a small book of his "Translations from Leopardi", but then decided to wait until Julian and Ursula next come here, as they 'might easily lose it moving about'. Pity they cannot come now, when the flowers in the woods are at their best. All quite well here; the [Sturge] Moores will return in a month. Originally enclosing, on Bessie's request, a photograph of 'the street in Forest Green that [Julian] used to admire'. The Bluths and Tet Htoot were here at Easter, but otherwise they 'seem to see nobody'. Hopes that Tet Htoot will bring two Chinese friends to visit. A 'bad London raid last night'; hopes he and the Bluths are all right; Irene [Cooper Willis?] has fortunately been away. Has very few friends in London now besides these, Logan [Pearsall Smith] and Alys [Russell]. Virginia [Woolf]'s death 'a great blow'; she 'felt she was going out of her mind again and could not face it'. Is re-reading "To the Lighthouse", his favourite of her books; is writing something on her for the "Abinger Chronicle", but it is 'impossible to say anything adequate in the way of criticism'. Forgets whether Julian knew her. Is continuing to translate Montaigne and getting 'a little bored with it'; 'much more fun writing poetry, even if it is not worth much'. Hopes Julian has managed to see Ursula at Taunton, and that she is well again. Has heard from G.M.T. [his brother George] that Charles is giving Wallington to the National Trust now instead of leaving it in his will; he will continue to live there, and one of the family (probably his son George Lowthian) will stay there after his death; this will save on death-duties so there will be much more money for the children. Supposes this should not be discussed until it is announced. Hopes Bessie will go with Miss Simpkins for a few days to George and Janet next month; otherwise she never 'goes away from here, which is not good for her'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Relieved all well about the measles; does not think it will spread and is glad the little girl [May Enticknap: see 46/174] is getting better. Would very much like to see Julian; expects he will soon be crawling. Mary goes home tomorrow; she has been very good, and much amused her grandfather, with whom she has long conversations. Sidney Lee stayed last night; the Ernest Trevelyans are coming from Oxford on Sunday. C[harles] and M[ary] cannot come till Sunday morning as it is 'the Ministerial ?Amusement'. She and Sir George will go up to town about the 22nd; she has a ticket for Elizabeth for the concert then. Sends her regards if Mrs Hubrecht [wife of Ambrosius Hubrecht?] is still there; had thought it was 'Mrs Jan' staying with Elizabeth. Glad her son's [Jan or Paul?] expedition is interesting. Hopes Mr Carter recovers soon. Sends love to Robert; hopes 'the musician with the striking name [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174] ' is pleasant. 'What praise of Strauss's new opera ["Elektra"]!'. A postscript saying she is glad 'Patterson succeeded'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The end of term is close: 'in fact there are less than 1,000,000 seconds' until it comes. The exam [for Harrow?] will be 'very exciting'. Though he has not yet decided on a 'present for Mr A[rnold]', Robert thinks he 'would like best something for his writing table, like a good paper-weight'; thinks it would be almost as good to get it at 'the beginning of the hols', though if his mother has already found something she could send it to Robert now.

Has written to C[harlie] today. G[eorgie] is 'quite well now, and is doing very well in his class'; Robert hopes he will be placed first or second. They did not go in for the history exam with the rest, as they were 'not good enough', but took it a month afterwards. Mr Arnold has got Mr [E.E.?] Bowen to 'look them over', and if they are good enough Mr Arnold will 'give a prize like Mr Bowen's'; if not, just an 'ordinary prize'.

They were beaten three-nil in the Farnborough match. Is reading 'Leslie Stephen's life of [Henry] Fawcett', and thinks it 'very interesting'. Is glad 'Spi[der?' is all right'; it is 'a great pity about Mr Gladstone'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear Julian is crawling now; will send a parcel for his birthday soon. Unlucky that Miss [Margaret?] V[aughan] Williams has caught measles; it can be bad in adults. Miss Martin came to Welcombe yesterday; they expect the Runcimans, Janet, and George on Saturday; think Charlie is also coming since he stayed at home with a cold last week. Thinks Elizabeth will like Mrs Walter Rea; glad she has 'such nice neighbours'. She and Sir George move to London on 22 Feb; she will go to the concert on the way from the station, and asks whether Elizabeth will be there. Asks how she liked 'the Spaniard' [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174]. Nice that Julian listens to music.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes the 'invalid' [Thomas Sturge Moore?] is better and can return home soon, though sure he is comfortable at the Mill House; Mrs Moore seemed 'such a nice creature, with her pretty French manners & sweet face'; sure Elizabeth likes helping her. Keen to hear whether Elizabeth got to Tunbridge [for the Conference, see 11/107]; admire her for having canvassed. She herself has had 'urgent telegrams' about a women's meeting in Horsham today; would be wonderful if Erskine won. Sir George is very pleased at [Theodore] Roosevelt's victory. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter have been staying for a couple of nights. Mary's cousin Blanche Stanley has been staying with her, who has a 'lovely soprano voice' and has been well taught. Mary has also got Charles to sing better; they are away now. Sends love to Robert, asks if he would like his "1001 Gems [of Poetry]" to be sent. Looking forward to the play. Asks if Elizabeth would like to have a box of chrysanthemums sent next week, and whether Mrs [Helen] Fry would like some, or Mrs Moore when they get back.

Postcard from Florence Cacciola Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Very glad to hear of the safe arrival of Robert (whmo she calls 'Calverley')'s son Paul - has not been well, or would have written sooner, but is now better. Hopes Elizabeth is 'well and strong again' and that the weather is good so she can get fresh air. Sends love to Mary and Charles and thanks for their letter of 20 December. Has 'never known such an unnatural winter at Taormina': there is 'much sickness - diphtheria, scarlatina, meningitis'. Her husband is well, but worried about her; the servants are 'quiet & satisfactory', the animals are all well. Sends best wishes to Paul for a 'long & happy life, full of health & prosperity'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear Elizabeth is comfortably settled at Florence; hopes she and Bob are enjoying their time with the Berensons; supposes they will reach Ravello around Christmas. Charles and Mary are back from 'ten days in their constituency with meetings every night'. There was a Women's Liberal Association meeting at Cambo on Wednesday; Charles chaired and Miss [Florence?] Balgarnie spoke, and it was an excellent meeting. Charles is now 'first rate' at public speaking, and Mary also can speak 'quite nicely'. Had a letter from Miss Somerville about the Westminster bazaar, which made forty pounds; she said the 'very nice things' which Elizabeth had sent sold quickly. Good to hear that Elizabeth and Robert's [new] house has got on so well; probably good for her to have a quiet time before she has to start thinking about moving, though it is possible to have so much. Caroline herself sometimes feels that at Wallington if she sees no one but Sir George for a week, though he - and Robert - are the 'best of company'. Hopes Elizabeth will come to Welcombe for Easter, when Robert is with his friends [on George Moore's reading holiday]. George is coming to them next week, and they go to Welcombe on 27 December. There is a 'great fuss' at the Grosvenor Cr[escen]t Club: the proprietress seems 'unsatisfactory', while the food and management have been 'very bad'; Caroline had decided to leave before she hear about the row. Julia seems to be the 'centre of it'; Caroline will send Elizabeth her letter. Julia is not 'very delightful or interesting, but she is perfectly respectable & not at all fast!'. Caroline paid Elizabeth's subscription on 17 January, so she had better write a resignation letter before then if she does not want to carry on; it is a great pity, as it 'was really a nice club at one time'. There will be a 'school treat' on Thursday, so she is hoping the mild weather will last. Is reading 'such a pleasant life of Burne Jones by his wife' ["Memorials of Edward Burne-Jones"]. Calls the Pre-Raphaelites 'an innocent high minded set, with all their absurdities'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth has got home safely and that Julian is happy. Encloses a cheque from Sir George to settle their account [for the stay at Eastbourne]. Annie [Philips] and Robin [Price] have been here this afternoon; they came to the crematorium at Golders Green [for the cremation of her sister Margaret Price] and have just left for Pen Moel. Annie says it is 'dreadful to have 2 days!' and has promised not to go to Tibberton for the funeral tomorrow. Good of Charles and George to go this morning, as well as Morton [Philips], two of the Gregs, Annie Thompson and Betty Bostock [?]. Sir George is well, and she feels better; they had a 'quiet walk in Kensington Gardens' yesterday and today, and she has started taking a tonic. Looks forward to seeing Elizabeth on Friday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is settled at Ravello and having a good Christmas day; expects it will be quiet, as theirs is. Had their 'very mild festivity' last night; George is staying, and C[harles], M[ary], and Mr Fitch came to dinner. They had music after dinner - Mary has greatly improved Charlie's singing - then 'played a letter game'. Most of their packing is done, and they leave [for Welcombe] on Tuesday; George will travel some of the way with them as he is joining Janet at Stocks for a week. The fogs in London, Manchester, Leeds and so on 'quite terrible last week'; hopes they will have gone. Asks if she may use one of Elizabeth's 'supernumeray [sic] silver inkstands' at Welcombe, as she is having a small room set up to use in the morning. George is well; he and Sir George discuss 'their respective works & the treatment of History &c &c &c at length & very amusingly'. Does not think George's book ["England Under the Stuarts"] has 'had a brilliant success', but it has been well reviewed. Asks to be remembered to Madame Palumbo; supposes Mrs Reid is still alive. Has received a postcard of Vesuvius from Heathcote Long so supposes he is somewhere near Naples. Asks if 'the diplomat' is any relation of Elizabeth's.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to R. C. Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - They returned home last night after a 'delightful week at Niton' [on the Isle of Wight]. Has now unwrapped the paper-case and blotting book which are 'pretty' and useful, and which he will greatly value as Bobbie's gifts. Will hope to receive few lines from Bobbie at the end of his first fortnight [at Harrow]; thinks he will be placed 'without further exam[inatio]n in Lower Remove', where the work will not be easy, with some of it familiar, so he need only keep from making 'avoidable blunders'. Hopes Bobbie will show them he has 'some idea of Latin Prose'. Asks him to tell George he will keep the same bed-room: Arnold will try to find someone George will like to share it with. Expects that after Midsummer he will share it with Booth's brother, who will join the school then. Is returning [James?] Welldon's letter, which Bobbie's mother 'kindly' let him read; thanks her for writing; he will reply to her when he has news about George. Hopes Bobbie's elder brother [Charles] has recovered, and that he will not 'lose his promotion': it would be 'very hard lines' if it did. Adds a postscript to say he is reading [John Robert] Seeley's "Expansion of England", and thinks Bobbie would like it: it is certainly 'more interesting than the dry-as-dust' he read for the Bowen prize; he can probably find it in his House library.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes that the snow in Italy has melted. Spent one night and '2 busy days' in London; Sir George went up for the day yesterday. Spent that evening with Janet, since George was at a 'review meeting' [for the "Independent Review"?], who is very well and 'enjoys the situation to the full'; approves of her preparations [for the forthcoming birth]. Thinks Charles and Mary are staying at Cambo till the end of the month. Mary has 'thoroughly got up the subject of Taxation of Land Values' and has given several short speeches on it; she has also written a leaflet which Caroline hopes to get printed for the W.L.F. [Women's Liberal Federation]. Good that she can help Charles politically. Wants Elizabeth's advice about pianos: there ought to be one at Welcombe, and she would 'like to change the monster in London!'. Has a room at Welcombe to write in now, so Elizabeth can now have the drawing room to herself to practice in. Expects Meg Booth will arrive [in Italy] soon. Asks if Elizabeth is thinking of going to Taormina this year; hopes the Grandmonts are well. "The Times" is 'so hard up for an argument for the sugar tax that they say it is unhealthy and that people should not eat so much'. A party of neighbours came for lunch recently, and more will come. Has had a 'nice letter' from Mrs Enticknap.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - News of Julian, who is well and does not seem to be too much disturbed by teething. He is always very excited when he sees Hearn [the butler] and 'insists on his lifting him up to look at the pictures'. Took him for a drive to the village yesterday, and now he has gone for his 'last poney [sic] cart drive'. Elizabeth's dinner on Monday will be very amusing; hopes she will not get tired out with her busy fortnight. Annie [Philips] is coming from Monday till Thursday; expects she will be in an 'over-energetic mood'; she must have helped the two young men [her Price nephews] very much as they have been making inventories. Has had no more letters from George, but C[harles] says he is quieter [after the death of his son Theodore]. Sends love and a "Times Literary Supplement" for Bob.

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