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Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian
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Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Asks Sidgwick if he has mastered Hegelian philosophy. Reminds him that they are all looking to him or John Mozley or both to tell them what he [Hegel] means. Remarks that [Septimus?] Hansard once said that 'he conceived his 'mission' was to translate Maurice to the people. Refers to W.D. Rawlin's 'funny voyage to America with Tom Hughes; remarks that '[w]hatever else it does for him it will probably deliver him from the [ ] represented by The Kiss of Peace.' Asks Sidgwick if he knows who wrote G[ ] Balz. Suspects that it might be Trevelyan, 'if it is not too good for the writer of C[ ].' Hopes to see Sidgwick at Christmas. Reports that he took Louis back to Eton, mainly in order that he may see Cornish, who, he reports, is quite well, and has not yet learnt the Gospel according to Matthew. Claims that it is not easy to have too many Cornishes, 'if they all take after their father.' [incomplete]

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to E.M. Young

Explains that he put off writing to Young until it had been decided whether or not Everett should be elected to 'the [Apostles] Society'. Announces that he had been accepted, and refers to him as 'a very clever man.' Refers to his declaration as 'very extravagant and Americans' and reports that 'old Martin was astonished.' States that now Trevelyan, Thompson and Jebb are gone down, a new and rather striking element is needed. Reports on recent discussions, including Trevelyan's speech criticising young men who give up their early ambitions and become schoolmasters. The latter being 'all for the edification of Fisher'. Remarks that Heathcote is 'still rather below the average of an Apostle but still he is improving.' Reports that there has been nothing heretical so far. Declares that he wishes to relieve himself of the charge of having recommended Goldwin Smith as a heretical work. States that it always gives him indigestion to read the Quarterly Review. Refers to the controversy between G. Smith and Mansel, which 'is rather metaphysical than theological'. Agrees with Young that illness has the effect of clearing away doubts. Declares that '[t]he Union is falling again rather'. [Incomplete]

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

States that he has been at Trinity College about a week, trying to write an article, but claims that he has been ill and shall probably be delayed. Does not think that solitary life agrees with his constitution, but clings to it because he believes that it helps him to concentrate his mind. Declares that he enjoyed his holiday very much, 'particularly the three weeks at the Lake [with G. O. Trevelyan and Edward Young].' Remarks that although he was happy in Dorsetshire, 'it was very melancholy being with poor Cowell', who is quite ill.

Reminds his mother of her invitation to [Charles Kegan] Paul to come to Rugby, and announces that he has asked him to come the following Easter. Does not know whether he will bring Mrs Paul or not. Asks her to send a volume of Fichte, and any books with library marks on them. Hopes to come to visit her on 3 October for a week. Explains that that is the day the Union Library opens and he wants to get some books 'before the country clergy have gone off with them all. Announces that it is thought that J. B. Mayor will be the new Professor of Moral Philosophy.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets to say that he will not see William the following week. Reports that the latter has written to say that he does not feel well enough to come to the 'Ad Eundem'. Informs her that the marmalade has arrived, 'and is very nice.' Asks her to tell Arthur that they 'lost "the whole ticket" at the elections to Council.' Does not think that it will much matter, and states that '[t]he questions which are coming to the front now in Academic affairs are not of a party character.' Regrets to see that the same state of affairs does not exist 'in the metropolis: and that the worst features of Parliamentary Elections are to be introduced into the Elections of school-boards in the Metropolis'. States that he allowed his name to be put on Miss [Garrett]'s committee for Marylebone. Has learnt that the elections are to cost about £1,000 per candidate, and Miss [Garrett], 'standing on principles of peculiar p[ ] will only spend £500.' Adds that it is 'a terrible waste of money.' Reports that Trevelyan has been there 'in a very triumphant and anti-military state.' Quotes Seeley on opposition to a reform. Asks her opinion of Myers' last poem in Macmillan['s Magazine]. Thinks it 'very fine', and remarks that Myers' ability 'to write anything so like Pope shows great versatility of style.' Adds that he is glad that she liked Catherine Symonds.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he is in the midst of scenery [in Carnarvon], 'which is not first-rate but very pleasing...', and comments on its similarity to the Lakes. Predicts that he shall enjoy himself much, as they have 'much exhilarating good fellowship and good talk at breakfast and in the evening: George Trevelyan, especially, being a well-spring of both.' States that he intends to be there for at least a week, returning to London probably early in September. Claims that he is behind with his work, and thinks that when the holiday is over, he shall have to work hard on till Christmas.

Asks her to thank their mother for her letter [101/176], which he intends to answer soon. Refers to [his cousin] Annie's remark as 'discriminative', and explains that the reason he chose to comment on 'that particular essay of Arnold's was not because it was the most impudent, but because it seemed the most complete and decisive enumeration of his theory of life.' States that he was glad to get Arthur's address, but does not think he will be sending a letter to him in Switzerland. Is glad to hear of her progress. Encloses 'a little poem' [not included], which he cut out of a magazine, and also 'a German effusion' of his [not included]. Advises her to get hold of Rückert's Selected works if she ever feels inclined to break new ground in German poetry. [Incomplete?]

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill-House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - They seem to be in similar circumstances this week: she has been helping to clean her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]'s big bookcases; the charwoman who helped her 'was amusing enough' and made some 'delightfully naïve remarks' about the books. Elizabeth sometime lends books for her or her boys to read. Last Monday they moved to the Hague; the three summers they have spent at Ede seem to have passed very quickly, thinks they were 'the happiest & most interesting' parts of her life so far so she has become attached to the place and 'even to the ugly house' and is sad to think of the new 'unsympathetic' owner changing it, though he can do little to the woods and moors. Is going to spend a few days at Almelo with an old married friend whom she has not seen for some time; she is very musical and her husband seems to be a good pianist; also Marie [Hubrecht's] American friend Maud Howard is coming to stay tomorrow and she is 'not over anxious to see much of her'. Marie is then going to spend the winter in Florence though, like Maud Howard, she is a little vague about her plans.

Has changed her mind about 'forcing circumstances' and now thinks it would be good to see Bob again; suggests he comes over to the Hague next month, on the pretext of doing some work such as a translation of [Joost van] Vondel with which she could help, to make it seem less strange to her uncle and aunt; would have to ask him to stay at a hotel unless her uncle invites him to stay, and knows all this will give him trouble. He must write and tell her sincerely what he thinks. She has discussed the plan with Bramine [Hubrecht] who reassured her there was nothing wrong with it. Gives the address of her friend at Almelo, Mrs Salomonson Asser.

Has just seen a portrait of Bob's father 'on an old Financial Reform Almanack'; remarks on his 'charming eyes'. Hopes Bob is enjoying himself bringing 'dry bones' to live. Asks if he went to the concerts [given by Julius Engelbert Röntgen and Johannes Messchaert] and appreciated the singer. Is reading the Brownings' letters again, which are charming but get terribly sentimental. The [Second Boer] war is indeed horrible; asks if there are reasonable views on its duration and 'what the end can be'; asks whether there are as many 'contradictory muddling telegrams' in British newspapers as in Dutch ones; glad that there are 'so many rightly thinking English', but they are still a minority. The Grandmonts are at Florence, but unfortunately will have left by the time the Frys arrive. Very kind of Trevelyan to transcribe some of his verses for her; looks forward to reading them though she says she is a 'highly unpoetical being'. Signs herself 'Bessie'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Seems Bob may be staying longer in Milan; is sorry for the Frys as Roger Fry is suffering from a bald cold. Has received a parcel from Bob's mother with photographs of his parents and brothers and is very glad to have them. Is glad Bob is enjoying himself at Milan and seeing many beautiful things; curious he has never been before; she remembers the "Cenacolo" [Leonardo's "Last Supper"] 'above all others', and many beautiful things at the Brera, though she and Bramine [Hubrecht] were there during a thunderstorm when it was very dark; looks forward to going again. Bob must not be 'too anxious' about her: she has got over her initial misery at their parting and now he is 'haunting [her] only pleasantly', as he says; she could not be made miserable by thoughts of him as she loves him too much; also trusts him completely.

Returns to the letter in the evening; has been out in the rain to see the dentist and 'arrange a torture hour with him', though less needs to be done than she feared; tonight is Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht]'s third lecture, and Paul [his son] has come to see the whale [see 8/14] and will probably go to the lecture on her ticket. Her aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven] has had a letter from Bramine, with an 'enthusiastic account' of how they [the Grandmonts?] are looking after the eye patients [at Taormina] and how helpful Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is now. Returns the next day to scold Bob for saying that 'modern art scarcely seems to exist' in Italy; says this is too sweeping a statement and fears 'Fry's dogmas' have been influencing him after all; hopes he will always 'be as inclusive as possible'. Went to Ambro's lecture after all; Paul stayed at home and worked, and this morning has gone to keep an eye on the work of cutting off the fat and baring the skeleton of the whale; he sends many greetings to Bob. The Frys' name for her sounds 'very splendid indeed' and is certainly better than 'Amoretta' which reminds her of 'amourette', a pet hate of hers; she would still like him to call her Bessie or Bess. Very good of him to send her a ring; she will always wear it on the fourth finger of her left hand; a shame he will not be able to put it on her finger and he will have to wear it somehow first.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia and forwarded to him c/o B. Berenson, 3. Via Camerata, Firenze. - Bob's last letter is one of his 'very nicest'. Her aunt has been much better again. Has paid some calls this afternoon, including to Mrs de Rhemen, Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht]'s Russian friend; the other old Russian lady [Countess van Rylandt] who knows Bob's parents was also there, and talked to Bessie about church music at Moscow; the rest of the visit was 'stupid & senseless' and Mrs de Rhemen's pet dog has given her a flea; they always come to her, so if she and Bob travel in Italy together he will be left in peace. Next morning, writes that there has been 'a great bustle' in the house as her gift of a 'fine old chestnut cabinet' was set up in her uncle's room; he will store 'all his papers & family reliques' in it as he did in the old one. Is disappointed and indignant that Mrs van Riemsdijk, having told her that they were not prepared to sell Tonina's violin but would let it to Bessie, which she declined knowing she would grow too fond of the instrument and did not want to insist since it had belonged to Mrs van Riemsdijk's husband, wrote to her aunt saying that Tonina had sold her violin abroad and wanted to keep this private. Will probably hear more about the matter from Ambrose [Hubrecht] 'who is her councillor and confident [sic]' and generally takes her side, but otherwise does not want to think about it; Bob's 'dear generous offer' of helping her buy it made the idea all the more precious, though the van Riemsdijks do not know that. Teases Bob for wanting to get back to England quickly to eat some 'beefy British dinners'; he will have a 'foretaste' of her 'dinner-ordering-capacities' when she comes, but she encourages him to stay a little longer if she is to cross on 14 Feb which now seems likely. Has forwarded two letters and a 'big Dorking one to Mr "Treveylan"; asks if this is Mrs Enticknap's spelling; admires her for adding 5 pence for postage abroad. Tells him to write from Florence.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall and forwarded to him at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Will study the patterns Bob has sent her and send them to London, with her choice for his 'nuptial trousers' and travelling suit. Will speak again to her uncle about Bob's objections to writing himself to the consul [Henry Turing]. Entreats Bob for Sir Henry House and his wife not to be invited to the wedding breakfast: her uncle and aunt, who will send out the invitations, do not know the Howards at all so it does not matter that they are 'very distant relations', while their presence would give 'a different ton to the whole business' and make her miserable. It is also likely that Grandmont and Bramine would not come if the Howards were invited, due to their objection to 'jingos'. Does not see it as necessary to invite the Howards, unless Bob's parents wish it especially. Sometimes wishes they could marry 'quietly without anyone near', though knows it could be a lovely day with happy memories; wishes people could 'take it easier'. Returns to the letter after a walk with her aunt, who agrees with her about having to give up part of her musical interests after marriage; understand what Bob means, and thinks she may have expressed herself too strongly in her first letter [9/45], which is the 'wretched side of correspondence'; will wait until she sees him to discuss it. Sees what Bob means about Mrs [Helen] Fry's cigarette smoking; cannot quite feel as he does yet; knows she does have 'a great and natural tendency to rectilineal & rather exclusive argumentation'; hopes she can 'suspend judgment' as Bob says. Does not know enough about German literature to comment on what he says about German literature, but emphasises the advantage, 'which the English nation as a whole is slow & rare in acknowledging' of being able to talk to foreigners in their own language; as an example, it was a real shame that Bob and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen were unable to converse properly; this is why she was so disappointed when he once refused to learn as 'it seemed such an insular British way of looking at it'. Ordered the book [Stevenson's "The Suicide Club"] for Jan [Hubrecht] and he was very pleased. Mr Kattendijke and Mr Loudon are coming to make music this afternoon. Lula [Julius Röntgen] is recovering from his severe illness. Joachim is going to play with his quartet in Amsterdam next Saturday, and Mien has got her a ticket; will stay with Mrs Guye [or Guije], Gredel's mother; would love to go to the supper party the Röntgens are having for Joachim after the concert but expects Mien has too many guests to invite her. Is glad not to see Bob with his beard, and hopes he never decides to grow one. Asks who Jacobi is, and for Bob to tell him what 'the Cambridge Moore [i.e. George] thinks of his play.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Agrees with Bob that he should not come over till mid-May, and does not think her uncle seriously wishes him to come earlier; does not understand why he is having friends to stay and going visiting again if he wants to get some more work done, but is glad he is going to see them. Thinks there will be plenty of time for business or visiting; they might go to Utrecht, Amsterdam and Rotterdam, and would love to go with him to Heerde in Gelderland where her sister [Henriette] lives; will have to go there to see the children and her husband the doctor before she leaves, though her sister is probably coming to the wedding. Does not know where Bob left the bed catalogue; thinks she remembers seeing it last in Charles's room at Grosvenor Crescent; asks if they can order a softer mattress. Will measure her Dutch pillowcases tomorrow and send him the measurements; further discussion of fittings and furniture, and arrangements for packing and unpacking her things. Bob should ask his mother about what tie he should wear with his frock coat; Dutch husbands always wear white tie with their evening dress; thinks blue or green suit him if he is to choose a coloured tie. If the patent boots he wore to Roger [Fry]'s wedding are still good he can wear them again. Hopes he will soon hear from Mrs Pepper; 'what a name for a honeymoon lady!!'. Spent two nights at Almelo which were enjoyable but so hot she had difficulty sleeping; Jeanne [Salamonson Asser] very kindly tried to 'read her to sleep out of "Pilgrim's Progress"'. Then went to Amsterdam, where she helped Mien [Röntgen] arrange the flowers and table, before they went to the [Joachim] concert which was 'delightful beyond words'; they did a Haydn, Brahms and a Beethoven quartet. Then they returned for the supper party, at which '[Bob's] friend young Harold Joachim, the Oxford fellow' was present; he sat next to her at supper and seems a 'very nice fellow'; they had met once before at St Andrews when she thought him 'a strange odd person & was in great awe of him'. Thinks Harold wants her and Bob to come and see them at Haslemere when 'Uncle Jo' is staying with them; Bessie was at school with his sister. Tomorrow the quartet are in the Hague, and Harold is crossing by night so she has invited him to lunch. When healths were being drunk at the end of the meal and she went up to Joachim to touch glasses, he at once proposed 'Ihr Bräutigam' ['Your bridegroom']; he remembered that Bob's father had once taken him home in his carriage. On Tuesday she went to see her 'socialist sister [Theodora] and her husband [Herman Heijenbrock]' on their farm and enjoyed her day with them more than she had expected to; they are very happy together and she admires their convictions though they do not convince her.

Returns to the letter next day, before going to meet [Alice and Herbert] Jones. Is sure Bob would be 'amused' to meet the socialist couple, but he [Heijenbrock] does not know English so it would be no good. Then went to stay with the aunt who lives nearby; she is not a 'favourite' in their house and they do not see her often, but several of her sisters see her often; the aunt was very friendly but it is never pleasant to be there. Fortunately her daughter, Bessie's cousin, was also there. Found her uncle and aunt fairly well when she returned, but the house is in 'a horrible state' due to the repainting, and they both have a slight cold. Went to the station to meet the Jones and they did not appear; English visitors 'always change their plans at the last minute or miss trains... or don't wire in time' as is the case for the Joneses, who are now coming tomorrow. [Harold] Joachim also cannot come to lunch and is calling in the afternoon. [Joseph] Joachim is staying tonight with Mr [Nicolaas] Pierson, the Finance Minister, and his wife, who has invited Bessie to a select party this evening. Is going to the concert tomorrow night with Alice Jones; the Röntgens may also come. The cellist [Robert] Hausmann is 'a charming person, so refined and artistic'; talked to him the other night and he admired Bob's ring. Bob will get this letter when he comes up to London to see his father. She thinks he should bring any work she has not seen on their honeymoon, as they might not have much quiet time before the wedding. Understands that his 'literary ambition is not connected with [his] love' and thinks this is right. Last half page with pillowcase measurements.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Has just received Bob's letter with the long explanation about his father's request; she understands, and had already said she would withdraw any objection [to inviting Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] if his parents wished it. She had made an objection 'long before the Grandmonts thought of it', but did not realize the Howards were 'so much & friendly related' to Bob's father. Has resolved not to be as worried about these things; it is not possible to insist on 'an ideal day'. Will talk to her uncle and ask him to send the invitation; hopes the Grandmonts will not decide to stay away, and agrees they should be told at once; Bramine knows how much it would hurt her if they did not come. Hopes they have forwarded the letter with her photograph to him. Originally enclosing the pattern she prefers for Bob's trousers. Tomorrow, she and Alice [Jones] are going sight-seeing in Amsterdam; they have talked a great deal about their school days; went to the English church with her this morning and did not enjoy yourself. Would be nice if Bob wrote a letter to thank the servants; thinks it would be best to send it to Booa [Mary Prestwich], but he should ask his mother who 'knows her people better'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Her uncle is sending off a letter to Bob's father quite different from the first one he planned; Ambro [Hubrecht] has written to say he disapproves of the first draft and enclosed one to be sent instead, which is 'a horrid hard, terrible letter... very polite but cruelly hard towards [Bessie and Bob]; does not know how Ambro can write such things. He asks if Sir George wishes to have the religious service after the wedding; hopes the reply is that Bessie and Bob should decide whether they want there to be one.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegr[acht], the Hague. - Her uncle returned the papers yesterday with a letter to Bob's father; she expects 'the engrossing etc.' will take some time, so if Bob wants to sign them before coming over he will need to wait; he should do what he thinks best, as her 'patience is quite infinite now', but it would be good if he could come by Wednesday. Her uncle wrote that they were satisfied with the settlement and that the wedding would be organised according to Bob's father's wishes; neither he nor her aunt want the church wedding at all, so it is 'absurd' that they listened to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s scruples, and there will be no more difficulty there. Discussion of the beds and bedding. If they can call at Grosvenor Crescent to pick up the parcel which Booa has for her, that will save Bob the trouble of bringing it; trusts him not to forget the spectacles. Will order Bob's room at the Twee Steden when she knows when he is coming; she and her uncle will order the rooms for his parents at the View Doelen this afternoon; she will then go to a 'little musical séance at the piano shop', with Mr Kattendijke playing and Mr Loudon singing; she will play a Handel sonata and a Bach aria. Thinks she will send the letter to London, though Bob 'seems to have got a nice dear old postman at Westcott, who understands the human heart'. Returns to the letter later to say that her uncle has the idea of holding the wedding breakfast at the Oude Doelen hotel; this would be easier in many ways, she dislikes the idea 'intensely', as she will explain when Bob comes, but will give in if he insists.

Concluded on a separate sheet [9/66]: wonders when Bob got her letter saying he ought to write to her uncle. Tuttie [Hubrecht] is now in Florence and wants to return as soon as she can. Thinks Bob will be able to get a nice top hat here; would like to choose one with him. Thinks the white silk tie will be perfect; likes that his mother has knitted it for that occasion. Glad he got both a Carlisle and a Meredith: a 'splendid present'. Hopes the walls [at Westcott] will be ready by the time they get there; he should tell Mrs Enticknap to air the mattresses in the sun, and must remember himself to bring all the papers her uncle talked about.

Menu card

Menu card with illustration of sailing boats in a harbour; dated 5 June 1900 on the back and signed by Robert C. Trevelyan, Bramine Grandmont H[ubrech]t, George Otto Trevelyan, M[aria] Hubrecht Pruys v[an] d[er] H[oeven], Am[brosius] Hubrecht, Caroline Trevelyan, P[aul] F[rancois] Hubrecht [?], Marie Hubrecht-Molewater, A[lphonse] Grandmont, P[aul] F[rançois] Hubrecht, Jan Hubrecht, Tuttie [Hubrecht], Charles Trevelyan and Elizabeth des Amorie v[an] d[er] Hoeven.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Roundhurst, Haslemere, Surrey. - Apologises for not writing sooner: has taken him a while to gather his thoughts on English books for her to read. Has not read Browning's letters to his wife, but her father tells him they are quite amusing; if they are as good as the one she read out to him, they should certainly be worth reading. There is also Mackail's life of William Morris, which he intends to read as Mackail knew Morris well and is a 'competent writer'; saw an excerpt which looked fun, as it should as 'Morris was a magnificent joke himself as well as a splendid person'. Has not yet read Henry James's "The Awkward Age", which is said to surpass all his earlier ones in difficulty, but recommends "In The Cage", or "Daisy Miller". Next week T[homas Sturge] Moore's book, "The Vinedresser and Other Poems" comes out, but he is sending a copy to the Grandmonts; is not sure whether they will like it, as it has 'great faults, which people with classical tastes are almost sure to dislike', but believes many of the poems are 'nearly perfect in their own queer way'. Recommends his father's book, "The American Revolution Pt I" which is 'at least readable and amusing"; his brother George's "The Age of Wycliffe" has already gone into a second edition. The middle part of the letter can be found as 13/85.

Ends by telling Bessie to get the third volume of Yeats' edition of Blake, 'read all the poetry that is not mad' and "The Book [Marriage] of Heaven and Hell", and look at the pictures. Hopes Miss [Emma?] Dahlerup is well; expects she will be going to Capri or nearby soon. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is glad that Bessie thinks their plan [to meet] so easy and that he 'overrated the difficulties' on her side; still thinks it may be better for him to go on to Italy after seeing her, saving the expense and 'beastliness' of two crossings and making him more likely to catch the Frys at Siena. Has always been able to work at Ravello, and doubts he will do much until he goes abroad. She must decide when he should come, and for how long; would like not to start before 11 November as he has promised to play [rugby] football then, but 'even the Sacred Olympian Games must give way , if necessary'. Says that he hates 'romance, at least in real life', and would not like her to be a 'Juliett, even if it were possible'; discusses Rostand's play "Les Romanesques", in which two lovers are not satisfied until their fathers fake a Romeo and Juliet style quarrel; thinks it more perfect than "Cyrano [de Bergerac]". Has not read "La Samaritaine"; thinks he would not care for it, as "[w]hen a Frenchman gets hold of J[esus] C[hrist] he usually makes him ridiculous", though it is 'bound to be clever and amusing'; Sanger saw 'Sally B [Sarah Bernhardt]' in it. Of Rostand's tragedies, has only read "La Princesse Lontaine"; thinks it a better play than "Cyrano". General thoughts about Rostand's plays and characters; he is 'a very charming person, and though dreadfully French [not] offensively so'. Glad Bessie liked his poem 'about Nothing at all' [see 9/80]; questions her objection to his translation of a line in the Ronsard poem, since she knows French much better than he does. The 'Indian poem' is part of a long one of which he has written the beginning and the fragment he sent; is not satisfied with it at all. Explains the correct English use of "shall" and "will". Has just seen an evening paper with an account of the disaster at Ladysmith [during the Second Boer War]; thinks it is the worst reverse the British army have had this century; resembles 'certain events in the War of American Independence' and this war is 'nearly as foolish and unnecessary'. Discusses possible results. Bessie is right that his father has fine eyes; thinks she would like him; he is very like Bob, 'only with more virtues and common sense, and fewer absurdities'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - It is very good of her to see the matter [his father's wish that Sir Henry Howard and his wife be invited to the wedding] the way she does; not possible for 'these sort of things' to be ideal; does not think the Howards will really spoil much, and hopes the Grandmonts will not be 'unreasonable' and come too. Had to tell his father of the Grandmonts' objections or he would been angry when he called on Sir Henry at the Hague and found he had not been invited. His father does not know Sir Henry well, but his aunt [Alice] Dugdale does, and in general his family 'are on very good terms with the Howards of Corby, though not very closely related'. His relations would very likely be offended if Sir Henry were not invited; does not particularly care about Aunt Alice, but his father does, and he does care for his Aunt Margaret and does not know how she would react. Sanger is engaged, and therefore quite recovered. True that she [Dora Pease] 'behaved so badly to him' and there is a doubt whether she is really in love with him, but Bob is optimistic; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson knows more and is reassuring; Bob has not yet seen Roger. Expects Sanger's wedding will be in July or August; wonders whether Bessie will like Dora, as people often do not and she has plenty of faults; yet she is not heartless. Splendid that Sanger is 'so miraculously cured'. Thinks he will go to Dorking on Thursday; MacCarthy and Sickert are coming to visit. Will write more later of what he did in Cambridge. Curious about Lily H[odgkin]; did know she was there [Dresden] and had just written to thank her for returning a book he lent her two years ago. Is glad to have her new photos, though does not think them very good.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Hopes his flowers reach her; his first since last summer, when he sent 'some Asphodel and some Mallow' ["Mallow and Asphodel", his first book of poetry]; they are mainly wild flowers. Explains the symbolism of all the flowers he has chosen, including ivy 'as the sacred plant of Bacchus' whom he worships 'in no vulgar sense, but as he was worshipped in the true esoteric mysteries'. Asks whether he should bring his poetry over to Holland or leave it in London. His father has written [to the lawyers] to say the papers must be ready to sign on Wednesday afternoon. Is going to London tomorrow; his parents will not return from Welcombe until Tuesday. The Enticknaps have given him a pair of brass candlesticks, which they could have in the dining room 'for ordinary use' or for reading in his room. [Charles] Sanger and [Robin] Mayor may cycle over for lunch or tea. Has had a 'delightful walk' and 'devised a new way of doing a mediaeval prose story' he has wanted to write for a long time. Has not done much German recently; will bring Wagner's librettos, which he thinks are 'damned fine poems'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to receive Elizabeth's letter; the Trevelyans are 'quite ready to forgive [her] and Robert for the little want of confidence'; tells her to ask 'quite frankly' about anything she thinks Caroline can help with. Wants to feel her 'a daughter in reality and not in name only'; she and her husband will welcome Elizabeth into the family; thinks she will find them 'very quiet people, easy to live with'. Hopes it will not be long before they meet. Glad Elizabeth is 'such a good English scholar' as Caroline knows no Dutch and has forgotten all the German she once knew. Is sure she will take an interest in Robert's work; he has seemed 'so lonely in his Surrey lodging'. Has not seen the house he has taken, but thinks it must be pretty. Glad Elizabeth took her time to decide on marriage. Sends regards to her aunt and uncle; looks forward to meeting them.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Spring still slow to come: the garden at Welcombe is 'gay with Hyacinths & Daffodils & primms squills &c but the trees are still brown'. Sir George caught a cold on the journey but not a bad one. 7 June will suit them if it is the best day for the wedding; the Hague is 'such a charming quaint town' and they will be happy to spend a few days there. Robert has gone to Cornwall; will be good for him to take regular meals and exercise; thinks he goes out a great deal but 'strolls about' and gets chilled, which as he has bad circulation is not good. Recommends that Bessie and he take 'one good walk together every day', which is a good time for talking; she and Sir George have always done it. Likes the sound of the wedding dress. Originally enclosing a list which [Mary] Prestwich has made of the house linen she thinks Bessie will want; she offers to obtain them and have them stamped in ink with initials. Lists the things that she will send to the Mill House from Welcombe; the towels are 'not a very good colour, as the washing here was never very good' but they will do to start. Would also like to send a sofa, and describes two for Bessie to choose from.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Lord Wolseley and his daughter [Frances], 'one of the C. Booth girls [Imogen]', Henry James and 'the L Courteneys [sic: Leonard Courtney and his wife?] have been staying at Welcombe; the weather is glorious. Expects the next month will be trying for Bessie; hard to leave 'such a kind home'; everyone will try to make it up to her. The Trevelyans are 'not very demonstrative' but already feel that Bessie is one of them. Charles and George have spent some time at Welcombe, but left yesterday; Sir George goes to London on Tuesday; she herself is staying till the 26th as her sister Mrs Price and her boys are coming to see some of the Shakespearean plays. Charles and George both hope to come to the wedding. Robert will be in London before long to settle some 'law business'. Thinks Bessie will be able to get Robert 'gradually into more regular habits', and he will see that 'batchelor [sic] habits cannot be continued'. Wise to choose the long sofa; will tell Mrs Enticknap when the things are to be expected. Has had a 'nursing meeting' and bazaar opening this week. Sir George is writing to Bessie's uncle. Asks whether it will be hot in the Hague in June.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - The Trevelyans have been to stay for two days at a 'little inn' at Wooler, visiting Flodden Field and Ford Castle. Continues the letter next day, after having been interrupted by 'the school treat'. Today a 'party of High School mistresses from Newcastle' are spending the whole day at Wallington. Hopes that there will be fine weather when Elizabeth comes in early August, and that she will stay while Annie [Philips, Caroline's sister] is there; understands that she and Robert both want to settle down at home so they must not feel bound to pay a long visit. Sure the Cambo Exhibition, which is on 18 Aug, will amuse Elizabeth. Charlie will be at home for the first half of the month, so there will be a family party with friends too. Delighted the Enticknaps are being helpful in getting everything in order. The clavichord [by Dolmetsch, decorated by Helen Fry] will be very interested to have. Meggiy [sic] Price asked about the piano, so Elizabeth should write when she is ready for it. Supposes she is not finding much time for the violin at the moment; the drawing room at Wallington is good for music. Wonders whether the 'Cambridge table has arrived. G[eorge] was very angry with his old Mrs Larkins about it'. Apologises for a 'most disjointed letter' since the young ladies have arrived and she has taken them for a long walk since starting the letter. Marie [Hubrecht] has sent her a 'capital photo' of the wedding party. Cannot get their furniture from Thunnissn [?] due to the continuing strike at Rotterdam. Will pay Elizabeth for the carriage of the goods from Welcombe.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Wonders if they have gone to town; wants to hear how they 'found them [the Knutsfords] at Pinewood'. George leaves tomorrow. Charles 'seems pretty safe to be re-elected'. Supposes Elizabeth and Robert do not 'hear much about the fight', but though she and Sir George 'are doing nothing this time of course [they] are intensely interested in it all'. They have had some 'delightful walks on the moors' in the lovely weather; often wishes Elizabeth were there. Hopes she has good news of her aunt and Marie. Is sending some figs; some game will follow tomorrow. Will let them know when they have been able to make plans about coming south.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very disappointed that Elizabeth is not coming to The Park [her sister Annie's house]; suggests arrangements for her visit to Dorking; will be sorry to miss Robert, and perhaps he will call on Friday morning. Charles is 'making a good fight' and she hopes he will keep his seat [Elland], but it is 'all very uncertain & difficult'; does not think the Government will gain many seats, but 'they will make out it is a great triumph'. Sir George sends his love, and is sorry he will not see Elizabeth.

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