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Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928), 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Strange and 'rather a bore' writing 1900. Has received Bessie's 'almond-bearing letter' [see 9/23]; remembers walking under other almond trees with her. Is going to put a bad dream into his play; is getting on slowly but quite well with it. Much relieved by a letter from [Lina] Duff Gordon; wrote to her saying he probably should have told her of his feelings for Bessie but explaining why that had been difficult, and that he was pained to think their friendship could not be the same again; she replied after a while with no mention of the misunderstanding, just writing 'the letter of one intimate friend to another'. He had promised to write a poem about the pet bat who visits her every winter, and she wrote down the bat's name as a reminder [cf. "The Lady's Bat"]. May have been unfair to Mrs C. [Mary Costelloe], but she certainly talked about him and Lina Duff Gordon 'in a way she had no right'; will try to avoid her, but it is difficult to see [Bernard] Berenson, whom he likes very much, separately. Berenson has written, and 'rather reproached' him for not visiting him at Florence on the way down; he is alone now as Mrs Costelloe has gone to London because her husband is dying. Bob may stop a couple of days on the way back, since Berenson is not coming to England this year; 'he rather feels neglect, and has been extraordinary kind' to Bob, though he 'is difficult at times'. Will not decide until he knows when he is coming to Holland. Continues the letter next day, Has not yet heard from his mother about whether he and Bessie should cross the Channel together. Thinks it would probably be best for her to stop at Grosvenor Crescent for a night on the way to Welcombe, but that can be determined later. Hopes she and Paul and Marie [Hubrecht] will persuade Willy van Riemsdijk not to go to Africa. Sorry that her aunt has such a bad cold; teases Bessie about learning cooking and 'fortifying [herself] against evil times in the barbaric isle, where neither foreign languages not [sic] the dressing of vegetables are understood'. Other people have also found his father's book difficult, and of course she knows little of British 'history or... parliamentary jargon'. Mr Straughn Davidson [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson?] , an Oxford don whom he rather likes, is coming at the end of the week

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Perfect recent weather; has done 'a fair lot of work' and thinks he is 'well started' on his new play about 'a man who comes back from the Crusades and finds his enemy in occupation of his castle'. [C.P] Scott, editor of the "Manchester Guardian", has asked him to send an account of the landslip disaster [at the Cappuccini hotel]; if Scott prints his letter he will show it her, as his 'first and perhaps... last attempt at journalism'. The accounts of the landslip in the papers are 'greatly exaggerated'; Bessie need not worry about him. Once read a review of [Kenneth Grahame's] "The Golden Age" by Swinburne, 'with more than his usual extravagance of praise'; was rather disappointed when he read some of it soon after. Fry's sister Isabel has written 'a somewhat similar book, but with no pretentions', which he thinks is worth 'twenty golden ages'; it is called "Unitiated" and he will get it for Bessie to read; Isabel Fry is very nice, and a little like Bessie in temperament. Will lend her [Stephen Philips'] "Paolo and Francesca"; does not think much of it. Is too lazy to copy out verses, as he promised. Agrees that it is wonderful to think of going out for dinner together; not that either of them do that much, but in moderation it is very good, and he has never dined out enough for the 'novelty of it to be spoilt' as it is for her uncle. Teases her about her dreams. Is sure with her uncle and Lord Reay's advice they will be able to arrange their marriage properly; they should have as few formalities as possible, and avoid being married again in England if they can; would like the date to be as soon as possible, in June, but she should decide. Notes that this is the last letter he will send dated 1899, and '1900 will look awfully odd'.

Very interested by her description of her childhood; Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is certainly ' not the sort of person to have understood [Bessie] at all'; he had something of the same difficulty with Charles, who however tried to be sympathetic and a good brother to him; Charles 'had a sterner and more orderly temperament' and Bob 'the more haphazard one'. George is 'a sort of cross' between the two, but with much more intellect than Charles. Encloses a letter from Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; knew she had taken a fancy to Bessie; 'her staccato style is admirably expressive. She does it in conversation often'. Had said in his letter that his parents might visit Sicily next winter and she might possibly see him with them and Bessie next year. Has nearly finished reading [Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant"; thinks it 'a most remarkable novel' though it does drag in places. Calls the muses her 'real rivals, my dear nine mistresses'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will be happy to 'write a line' [a reference] for Elizabeth's nurse but needs to know her name. Hopes Elizabeth is feeling the cold less. Sir George has had 'a sharp attack of "Rheumaticks" making him quite lame', but he is much better this morning. Agrees about Miss Martin, who is 'so sterling and always... to be depended on'; Elizabeth will see how good she was with children, as she 'never played on their feelings, as so many governesses do, but kept them in order quite naturally'. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is very busy but 'seems cheerful'; Caroline took her for a drive and walk yesterday which she enjoyed. Hopes the game arrived safely. Robert should have the five copies of his book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] 'sent direct as if from him'; they are looking forward to seeing it. Glad Elizabeth liked the blotter and hopes she will use it; sorry that she still has to go on with treatment but at least she can do it herself; expects she will 'find the day long enough getting up later for another week'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - Has been out most of the day since there was some sunshine, and has written a few lines. Seems that old [Pasquale] Palumbo is 'in great danger'; has offered to move to another hotel for a week or two, but Pasquale's wife will not hear of it; she 'takes a sort of mother's care of him' and says the rooms of the Albergo Toro will be damp. Will stay for a while, but does not think he should stay if Palumbo gets worse; only Italians go to the Toro but sure he would be all right there. Has just received Stephen Philips' play about Paolo and Francesca; cannot see as much in it as 'many very clever people do'; it has 'effective theatrical scenes' and 'some rather fine poetry', and if it succeeds when acted next year it will make things easier for [Thomas Sturge] Moore and [Laurence] Binyon, and for himself, if he manages to finish a verse play, but it is still a bad play. Recommends that she read "Romeo and Juliet" and the "Merchant of Venice" if she has not already; thinks he should charge her a fee in kisses for giving her literary advice. Finishes writing for the day with a doggerel verse recommending that she wear socks in bed to keep warm.

Returns to the letter the following evening; glad she got on so well with the dentist, and 'recognises her portrait' in [Chaucer's] Merchant's Wyve. Hopes she will send her photograph soon. Found her account of 'the Russian ladies [Madame de Rhemen and Countess van Bylandt] and Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht; see 9/17]' very entertaining. Does not remember the Comtesse de Bylandt, but will ask his parents about her. Teases her for dreaming that she was married to [Bram] Eldering. Palumbo seems better today. Weather fine today, and he has got on well with his play; 'cannot get along in the rain'. Also thought of a new poem on Elijah in the desert, but might not write it now. Hopes to get over a month of work done, and not to return before the end of January; his mother has just written that she would like Bessie to stay with them at Welcombe early in February; thinks that would be the best plan, so he would probably not spend more than a few days in Holland on the way back; does not know whether it would be considered right to travel back together so she should ask her uncle and aunt.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill-House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - They seem to be in similar circumstances this week: she has been helping to clean her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]'s big bookcases; the charwoman who helped her 'was amusing enough' and made some 'delightfully naïve remarks' about the books. Elizabeth sometime lends books for her or her boys to read. Last Monday they moved to the Hague; the three summers they have spent at Ede seem to have passed very quickly, thinks they were 'the happiest & most interesting' parts of her life so far so she has become attached to the place and 'even to the ugly house' and is sad to think of the new 'unsympathetic' owner changing it, though he can do little to the woods and moors. Is going to spend a few days at Almelo with an old married friend whom she has not seen for some time; she is very musical and her husband seems to be a good pianist; also Marie [Hubrecht's] American friend Maud Howard is coming to stay tomorrow and she is 'not over anxious to see much of her'. Marie is then going to spend the winter in Florence though, like Maud Howard, she is a little vague about her plans.

Has changed her mind about 'forcing circumstances' and now thinks it would be good to see Bob again; suggests he comes over to the Hague next month, on the pretext of doing some work such as a translation of [Joost van] Vondel with which she could help, to make it seem less strange to her uncle and aunt; would have to ask him to stay at a hotel unless her uncle invites him to stay, and knows all this will give him trouble. He must write and tell her sincerely what he thinks. She has discussed the plan with Bramine [Hubrecht] who reassured her there was nothing wrong with it. Gives the address of her friend at Almelo, Mrs Salomonson Asser.

Has just seen a portrait of Bob's father 'on an old Financial Reform Almanack'; remarks on his 'charming eyes'. Hopes Bob is enjoying himself bringing 'dry bones' to live. Asks if he went to the concerts [given by Julius Engelbert Röntgen and Johannes Messchaert] and appreciated the singer. Is reading the Brownings' letters again, which are charming but get terribly sentimental. The [Second Boer] war is indeed horrible; asks if there are reasonable views on its duration and 'what the end can be'; asks whether there are as many 'contradictory muddling telegrams' in British newspapers as in Dutch ones; glad that there are 'so many rightly thinking English', but they are still a minority. The Grandmonts are at Florence, but unfortunately will have left by the time the Frys arrive. Very kind of Trevelyan to transcribe some of his verses for her; looks forward to reading them though she says she is a 'highly unpoetical being'. Signs herself 'Bessie'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is glad that Bessie thinks their plan [to meet] so easy and that he 'overrated the difficulties' on her side; still thinks it may be better for him to go on to Italy after seeing her, saving the expense and 'beastliness' of two crossings and making him more likely to catch the Frys at Siena. Has always been able to work at Ravello, and doubts he will do much until he goes abroad. She must decide when he should come, and for how long; would like not to start before 11 November as he has promised to play [rugby] football then, but 'even the Sacred Olympian Games must give way , if necessary'. Says that he hates 'romance, at least in real life', and would not like her to be a 'Juliett, even if it were possible'; discusses Rostand's play "Les Romanesques", in which two lovers are not satisfied until their fathers fake a Romeo and Juliet style quarrel; thinks it more perfect than "Cyrano [de Bergerac]". Has not read "La Samaritaine"; thinks he would not care for it, as "[w]hen a Frenchman gets hold of J[esus] C[hrist] he usually makes him ridiculous", though it is 'bound to be clever and amusing'; Sanger saw 'Sally B [Sarah Bernhardt]' in it. Of Rostand's tragedies, has only read "La Princesse Lontaine"; thinks it a better play than "Cyrano". General thoughts about Rostand's plays and characters; he is 'a very charming person, and though dreadfully French [not] offensively so'. Glad Bessie liked his poem 'about Nothing at all' [see 9/80]; questions her objection to his translation of a line in the Ronsard poem, since she knows French much better than he does. The 'Indian poem' is part of a long one of which he has written the beginning and the fragment he sent; is not satisfied with it at all. Explains the correct English use of "shall" and "will". Has just seen an evening paper with an account of the disaster at Ladysmith [during the Second Boer War]; thinks it is the worst reverse the British army have had this century; resembles 'certain events in the War of American Independence' and this war is 'nearly as foolish and unnecessary'. Discusses possible results. Bessie is right that his father has fine eyes; thinks she would like him; he is very like Bob, 'only with more virtues and common sense, and fewer absurdities'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Apologises for not replying sooner; went to Cambridge on Saturday and found 'so much to do and talk about' that there was no time to write. Is going to Dorking tomorrow as his furniture is coming; the house should have been ready a week ago. Will dine with his mother that evening, then on Thursday he is going to Harrow to play [rugby] football against the school on Founders' Day; afterwards will dine at the Headmasters' and go to a 'smoking concert'; the day after that he will dine at his father's club. Will only then really begin the solitude of his 'rural retreat' and is looking forward to 'a quiet and industrious time at last'. Glad Bessie liked the Frys and they got on well with her uncle; not surprised she found 'a certain difficulty in becoming intimate with them', since he thinks Fry's mind is very different to hers and that he is not always quick to adapt himself, while Helen Fry is not like that but is often 'rather diplomatic in conversation until she knows all about a person'; this is not insincerity, as some people think. Heard from them today [see 4/27]; they enjoyed their visit, and Fry seems to have taken 'tremendously' to her uncle and aunt. Went to Highgate last week to see Tom [Sturge] Moore the poet, who read two new poems; criticises the first line of the one about Leda and the swan; Moore is 'always charmingly good-natured when one criticises, and sometimes even will be convinced.' Spent most of yesterday talking to Tom's brother [George] the philosopher. Great excitement at Trinity as the philosopher MacTaggart [sic: John McTaggart], who used to 'disapprove of marriage on metaphysical grounds, is bringing home a New Zealand hospital nurse called Daisy Bird as his wife'; he may need consolation as on his return from his year in New Zealand he will find that Moore and another [Bertrand Russell?], 'his most promising pupils and followers, have set up an entirely new and antagonistic system of the universe'. Sat at dinner at Trinity next to a science fellow [John Newport?] Langley whom he likes very much, who knows and thinks highly of [Ambrosius?] Hubrecht; Langley asked whether "[Till] Eulenspiegel" was originally written in Flanders; perhaps Grandmont knows. Has begun to learn German; finding it easier than expected in some ways, but has not yet got far. What Bessie says about women's tendency to either conceal or be overly frank about their ages seems more or less true to him; her allusion to his having had 'the benefit of women's society and friendship' amuses him, as if she wanted to make him 'a sort of Platonic and sentimental Don Juan' which he is certainly not; before her he has known very few women well, and only in one or two cases has he known them ' rather sentimentally' at some point; does not consider himself 'at all learned in women's psychology and character'. Finishing this letter in the room of a friend who has 'studied the female character far more profoundly', but since he has never fallen in love to his knowledge, Bob looks on him as his inferior.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Blames the 'heat which brings on indolence' for his delay in replying to her last letter. Saw Madame Grandmont at the Bowmans', where he spent a very pleasant evening; she has since written to say he can visit in early September, so asks Bessie to tell her that will suit him very well. Is not going to Bayreuth, so will come straight out to Holland, which he is looking forward to seeing again. Has left the heat in the South of England and come up to 'the cool and airy atmosphere of Northumberland'. Is glad she likes the Odyssey; her translation is 'quite correct and scholarly', although a little too Biblical and free with 'withals' and 'verilys'. Agrees generally with what she says about [Henry] James: he need not always be so obscure, though 'vague ideas can often only be vaguely expressed'; discusses some of the characters and scenes he admires. Supposes she will be going to Denmark now; hopes she enjoys her music there; he has heard little for weeks and fears he will not until he goes to Holland. Is glad she enjoyed "Marrow and Asparagus" [his "Mallow and Asphodel"]; but she must like [Thomas Sturge] Moore's poems better, particularly "The Vinedresser", "The Panther", and "At Bethel"; the parts of Moore's poetry he likes 'mean more to [him] than anything that has appeared in England since Browning's early and great days". Will send for [Lagerlof's] "Antichrist Miracles" as is keen to see Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] 'glorified by fiction', even if she is depicted as 'a witch or Fiery, instead of the mild lady she really is'; has always intended to make her 'the subject of a romance' when he takes to writing novels in his old age. Bessie can keep [his father's] "American Revolution" until he comes. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts. His father has just bought a Madonna by [Francesco] Francia; they are all very pleased with it, though he is amused by the comments of the servants. The butler secretly prefers the not very good copy of Raphael's "Madonna della seggiola" which used to hang in the room; he says the 'lady' is pretty '(being good protestants, they won't call her the Madonna or the Virgin)', but the baby is 'rather a funny-shaped baby', and at least Raphael gave his child some clothing; says Mrs Prestwitch [sic: Mary Prestwich] (the old nurse, now housekeeper) knows more about babies than he does, and she is not sure about the baby; supposes neither he nor his brothers were 'exactly that type of infant' when they were in her nursery.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Roundhurst, Haslemere, Surrey. - Apologises for not writing sooner: has taken him a while to gather his thoughts on English books for her to read. Has not read Browning's letters to his wife, but her father tells him they are quite amusing; if they are as good as the one she read out to him, they should certainly be worth reading. There is also Mackail's life of William Morris, which he intends to read as Mackail knew Morris well and is a 'competent writer'; saw an excerpt which looked fun, as it should as 'Morris was a magnificent joke himself as well as a splendid person'. Has not yet read Henry James's "The Awkward Age", which is said to surpass all his earlier ones in difficulty, but recommends "In The Cage", or "Daisy Miller". Next week T[homas Sturge] Moore's book, "The Vinedresser and Other Poems" comes out, but he is sending a copy to the Grandmonts; is not sure whether they will like it, as it has 'great faults, which people with classical tastes are almost sure to dislike', but believes many of the poems are 'nearly perfect in their own queer way'. Recommends his father's book, "The American Revolution Pt I" which is 'at least readable and amusing"; his brother George's "The Age of Wycliffe" has already gone into a second edition. The middle part of the letter can be found as 13/85.

Ends by telling Bessie to get the third volume of Yeats' edition of Blake, 'read all the poetry that is not mad' and "The Book [Marriage] of Heaven and Hell", and look at the pictures. Hopes Miss [Emma?] Dahlerup is well; expects she will be going to Capri or nearby soon. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts.

Menu card

Menu card with illustration of sailing boats in a harbour; dated 5 June 1900 on the back and signed by Robert C. Trevelyan, Bramine Grandmont H[ubrech]t, George Otto Trevelyan, M[aria] Hubrecht Pruys v[an] d[er] H[oeven], Am[brosius] Hubrecht, Caroline Trevelyan, P[aul] F[rancois] Hubrecht [?], Marie Hubrecht-Molewater, A[lphonse] Grandmont, P[aul] F[rançois] Hubrecht, Jan Hubrecht, Tuttie [Hubrecht], Charles Trevelyan and Elizabeth des Amorie v[an] d[er] Hoeven.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Very sweet of Bob to send the flowers, though they have not yet arrived, and the 'dear' letter about them. Hopes the high wind drops before his crossing; will sympathise if it does not and he puts off travelling, but he must wire to let her know. Her uncle received Bob and his father's letters this morning; thinks everything will come right with the papers. Wrong of Bob 'not to trust a Dutch hatter'; she finds out 'more and more what an insular mind' he has; jokes that there is still time for her to change her mind about marrying him. Thinks her uncle has decided to give the wedding luncheon at the hotel; this does seem more convenient, though 'one nasty side' remains. There has been 'an absurd though rather nasty misunderstanding about the plan again' which she will tell him about later if necessary; her aunt is on her uncle's side as ever on the matter. Mr [Henry Yates] Thompson's presents sound very nice, particularly the Cambridge book. Hopes Bob enjoys "Tannhauser"; it is her least favourite of the music by Wagner she has heard. Would like to see at least some of the poetry he has been working on, and certainly his play. Bob says he sent her "Mallow and Asphodel" last summer; in fact he gave her his book in November when he had come on their 'Vondling expedition'; remembers the 'sweet confusion & doubt' they felt then, which has now become love. Finishes off the letter later, after going with her aunt to try on the wedding dress, which is 'very gorgeous & splendid'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegr[acht], the Hague. - Her uncle returned the papers yesterday with a letter to Bob's father; she expects 'the engrossing etc.' will take some time, so if Bob wants to sign them before coming over he will need to wait; he should do what he thinks best, as her 'patience is quite infinite now', but it would be good if he could come by Wednesday. Her uncle wrote that they were satisfied with the settlement and that the wedding would be organised according to Bob's father's wishes; neither he nor her aunt want the church wedding at all, so it is 'absurd' that they listened to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s scruples, and there will be no more difficulty there. Discussion of the beds and bedding. If they can call at Grosvenor Crescent to pick up the parcel which Booa has for her, that will save Bob the trouble of bringing it; trusts him not to forget the spectacles. Will order Bob's room at the Twee Steden when she knows when he is coming; she and her uncle will order the rooms for his parents at the View Doelen this afternoon; she will then go to a 'little musical séance at the piano shop', with Mr Kattendijke playing and Mr Loudon singing; she will play a Handel sonata and a Bach aria. Thinks she will send the letter to London, though Bob 'seems to have got a nice dear old postman at Westcott, who understands the human heart'. Returns to the letter later to say that her uncle has the idea of holding the wedding breakfast at the Oude Doelen hotel; this would be easier in many ways, she dislikes the idea 'intensely', as she will explain when Bob comes, but will give in if he insists.

Concluded on a separate sheet [9/66]: wonders when Bob got her letter saying he ought to write to her uncle. Tuttie [Hubrecht] is now in Florence and wants to return as soon as she can. Thinks Bob will be able to get a nice top hat here; would like to choose one with him. Thinks the white silk tie will be perfect; likes that his mother has knitted it for that occasion. Glad he got both a Carlisle and a Meredith: a 'splendid present'. Hopes the walls [at Westcott] will be ready by the time they get there; he should tell Mrs Enticknap to air the mattresses in the sun, and must remember himself to bring all the papers her uncle talked about.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Her uncle received Bob's letter with 'all the legal papers, settlement etc.' last night. Asks if Bob read through the settlement; she tried to last night but did not understand everything, nor did her uncle, so he has sent it to his lawyer to have it explained and they will return it as soon as possible. Her uncle was surprised not to find the marriage contract enclosed; thinks he expects Bob to write saying he approves and sending the contract back. Does not now feel 'bitter' about the earlier tensions as she loves and understands her uncle too much. [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife called yesterday and left cards, so the 'bridge' is formed. Is busy with packing and clearing; tonight she will look through an interesting old collection of papers relating to her mother's life and marriage with her uncle; she will certainly want to keep her mother's own letters. Tomorrow she is lunching with her 'only Dutch co-senior of St. Andrews, a girl from Rotterdam whose mother was an old friend of Bramine [Hubrecht]'s. Likes the clavichord present all the more as she thinks of it; thinks it very nice of Bob's friends; asks if Mrs [Helen] Fry [who decorated it] is pleased, and what 'poor Dolmetsch' will do without it. Teases Bob for having 'wedding presents from nice young lady friends [Lily Hodgkin] sent over from Dresden' and keeping it secret from her; she found out from Alice Jones. Tells him not to forget the parcel Booa will give him, nor the gold spectacles; he should also bring his play and any other poems he likes.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Was 'utterly & completely relieved' by Bob's letter this morning; her uncle has been 'wrong & absurd in many ways', perhaps in different ways than Bob thinks, but it does not matter and they can discuss it and settle things when he comes. Her uncle is at Amsterdam and Utrecht today, so she is alone with her aunt at home. Would have been very disappointed if Bob's father had not come; says this will be her last letter on the subject; she may have been wrong in not showing Bob's mother's letter to her uncle at once, but does not think her own letter to Bob's father was wrong. Will ask her uncle where papers are sent, and if Bob can sign them here if there is a delay; would like him to come on Monday or Tuesday but can be 'magnanimously generous' if he needs to come a few days later. Would like to have seen Bob ordering the beds; asks if he found them at once, and about the mattress and pillows. Did not realise the Apostles' dinner was in London; better as it is nearer, so they can stay in a hotel for a night and go on afterwards. Is very glad to have seen and liked the clavichord at Dolmetsch's; is glad Trevelyan is pleased with the present, and it will be a 'precious thing to have', though it is rather comical that neither of them can play it. Tells Bob to bring over a 'nice hat' and 'clean overcoat', as well as his evening suit. Explains her preference for travelling to England via Flushing [Vlissingen] rather than the Hook. Is reading "Pride and Prejudice": 'how good it is, & amusing!'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Her uncle is sending off a letter to Bob's father quite different from the first one he planned; Ambro [Hubrecht] has written to say he disapproves of the first draft and enclosed one to be sent instead, which is 'a horrid hard, terrible letter... very polite but cruelly hard towards [Bessie and Bob]; does not know how Ambro can write such things. He asks if Sir George wishes to have the religious service after the wedding; hopes the reply is that Bessie and Bob should decide whether they want there to be one.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Things are looking 'a little brighter': if Bob is at Grosvenor Crescent he will have heard from his father about her letter to him and his response; asks whether his father or he thinks it was wrong of her to write. Sir George said she ought to tell her uncle at once about his wife's letter; was glad he seemed not to have entirely made up his mind not to come. Has had a long talk with her uncle, which resulted in him writing a draft letter to Bob's father that she thinks 'will entirely clear up the matter'; he was 'very distressed' when he realised the possible consequences. Her uncle writes that if Bob's father writes a few lines saying he would like to see [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife at the wedding, this will serve as an introduction and he will go and call on them; he also writes that in his son Ambro's view, the presence of the Howards means that the wedding should be celebrated in the English church, and Bessie was 'so astounded' she forgot to tell him the Howards are Roman Catholic so she does not think they 'care a hang'; she told him this morning. Her uncle has sent Ambro the draft letter to see what he thinks. She has felt very lonely and distressed, but now everything is all right and she is looking forward very much to Bob's arrival; feels 'incompleteness' without him, as if her '"moitié", as Grandmont always says' had been taken away. Hopes he has had a good time with [Desmond] MacCarthy and [Oswald] Sickert. Thinks the idea of going to stay near Roundhurst for a few days at the beginning of the honeymoon is 'delightful'. He seems to have had nice [wedding] presents; she is keeping a list of them. Mentions again that Alice Jones wanted to give her a book; her aunt at Hilversum has sent an antique silver clothes-brush. Tried on her wedding-dress the other day and felt 'enormously grand with a train'. Is doing her accounts for the year.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Received the letter Bob wrote on Friday this morning, which did her 'a great deal of good': she needs to be told that it is not worth getting depressed over little things on the 'frontier of [their] promised land'; will try to stay calm and wait to hear from his parents in response to her letter to his father. Last night she talked the matter [whether to invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] over with her uncle again; he still has objections but did not come to any firm conclusion, and they agreed it would be best to wait until Bob's arrival. Sir George's letter, though, may 'upset all', as she would have to explain to her uncle and aunt about his decision [not to come to the wedding] if he does not change his mind. Does not think Bob realises that it would then look as if his father was 'mortally offended & angry', and her uncle would be sure to take it that way, which might lead to a 'brouille [quarrel]' between them. She has seen the misery of quarrels often in her life and would be very sorry if anything of the kind took place. Tells Bob he ought not to miss the [Cambridge] Apostles' dinner on 13 June; they could perhaps go to Blackdown for a while so he could go to Cambridge for it; will be 'a great thing' for him to be there 'so soon after [he has] obtained the dignity of a married man'. Is glad about [Charles] Sanger but wants to hear more.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Returned from Amsterdam to find Bob and his mother's letters; is very sorry that he has spoken to his parents about her 'unfortunate letter', which caused his father to decide not to come over for the wedding, when she had emphasised that she was writing about her conversations with her uncle privately as she 'knew & hoped' he would reconsider; was writing in despondent mood after hearing her uncle's first objection to [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife being asked, but he always makes difficulties and then thinks differently, and had never decided in any case that he would not invite them. He was disturbed that day as he had misunderstood what she was saying about the Grandmonts, and thought she planned to write and tell them 'point blank' that the Howards were to be invited, without persuading them to come all the same. Bob seems to think it would be simpler for his father not to come, but she tells him it would be 'simply terrible': she would be very unhappy, and her uncle and aunt would be very disappointed, and probably very angry with her for writing so openly to Bob about what they say. She has written this afternoon in her 'despair' to Bob's father explaining the matter frankly, trying to make him see her point of view and begging him to reconsider his decision. Know this was 'very bold' and hopes Sir George will forgive her; asks Bob to try and persuade him to come as well. Bob's mother's letter was very kind, but she is 'horribly frightened' to think what she has done; should never have written to Bob as she did but did think he would keep it private. Very sweet of Bob to think of coming over sooner, but it is not necessary.

Letter concludes on a separate sheet [9/67]. Told Bob's father she would not tell her uncle about his decision until she heard again from him, so is 'walking about with the awful weight' upon her and nobody to share it

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Hague. - Talked to her uncle this evening, but he did not respond as well as she thought he would to the suggestion that [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife should be invited to the wedding; these days he cannot grasp a new idea 'without making a difficulty, an obstacle out of it'; this time he said the character of the occasion would be changed and it would become a 'state party', and she assured him she did not mind. Since he has never met the Howards he felt he could not invite them; she told him to think about the idea until Bob came over, when he may get to know them and ask them. Thinks it will all come right; his habit of making difficulties is 'infectious' and she asks Bob to help her resist this tendency in herself.

Returns to the letter on Tuesday morning [1 May]: wishes Bob were there to ''help & comfort her' since her uncle has been 'raging' at her for suggesting writing to the Grandmonts to tell them about perhaps inviting Sir Henry. Her aunt has just talked to her about it: they are 'very much against ' being obliged to ask someone they do not know and do not really care to ask; tells Bob this privately and thinks it best to wait now until he comes over and can talk to her uncle himself. It might be even better, if Bob's father strongly wishes the Howards to be invited, that he write and say so himself to her uncle, and give him an introduction to them. She only wanted to be totally frank, and thought telling her uncle how strongly Bob's father felt would persuade him; instead she has made him 'feel offended' at the idea of Bob's father 'wishing to govern' his invitations and 'threatening' that he would not come over if the Howards were not invited. Feels very helpless; hates to 'make a "stand" against people'; her uncle is very hard to deal with and her aunt just supports him. Poor Alice Jones must know something is going on, but she cannot discuss this with her.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Has just received Bob's letter with the long explanation about his father's request; she understands, and had already said she would withdraw any objection [to inviting Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] if his parents wished it. She had made an objection 'long before the Grandmonts thought of it', but did not realize the Howards were 'so much & friendly related' to Bob's father. Has resolved not to be as worried about these things; it is not possible to insist on 'an ideal day'. Will talk to her uncle and ask him to send the invitation; hopes the Grandmonts will not decide to stay away, and agrees they should be told at once; Bramine knows how much it would hurt her if they did not come. Hopes they have forwarded the letter with her photograph to him. Originally enclosing the pattern she prefers for Bob's trousers. Tomorrow, she and Alice [Jones] are going sight-seeing in Amsterdam; they have talked a great deal about their school days; went to the English church with her this morning and did not enjoy yourself. Would be nice if Bob wrote a letter to thank the servants; thinks it would be best to send it to Booa [Mary Prestwich], but he should ask his mother who 'knows her people better'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Agrees with Bob that he should not come over till mid-May, and does not think her uncle seriously wishes him to come earlier; does not understand why he is having friends to stay and going visiting again if he wants to get some more work done, but is glad he is going to see them. Thinks there will be plenty of time for business or visiting; they might go to Utrecht, Amsterdam and Rotterdam, and would love to go with him to Heerde in Gelderland where her sister [Henriette] lives; will have to go there to see the children and her husband the doctor before she leaves, though her sister is probably coming to the wedding. Does not know where Bob left the bed catalogue; thinks she remembers seeing it last in Charles's room at Grosvenor Crescent; asks if they can order a softer mattress. Will measure her Dutch pillowcases tomorrow and send him the measurements; further discussion of fittings and furniture, and arrangements for packing and unpacking her things. Bob should ask his mother about what tie he should wear with his frock coat; Dutch husbands always wear white tie with their evening dress; thinks blue or green suit him if he is to choose a coloured tie. If the patent boots he wore to Roger [Fry]'s wedding are still good he can wear them again. Hopes he will soon hear from Mrs Pepper; 'what a name for a honeymoon lady!!'. Spent two nights at Almelo which were enjoyable but so hot she had difficulty sleeping; Jeanne [Salamonson Asser] very kindly tried to 'read her to sleep out of "Pilgrim's Progress"'. Then went to Amsterdam, where she helped Mien [Röntgen] arrange the flowers and table, before they went to the [Joachim] concert which was 'delightful beyond words'; they did a Haydn, Brahms and a Beethoven quartet. Then they returned for the supper party, at which '[Bob's] friend young Harold Joachim, the Oxford fellow' was present; he sat next to her at supper and seems a 'very nice fellow'; they had met once before at St Andrews when she thought him 'a strange odd person & was in great awe of him'. Thinks Harold wants her and Bob to come and see them at Haslemere when 'Uncle Jo' is staying with them; Bessie was at school with his sister. Tomorrow the quartet are in the Hague, and Harold is crossing by night so she has invited him to lunch. When healths were being drunk at the end of the meal and she went up to Joachim to touch glasses, he at once proposed 'Ihr Bräutigam' ['Your bridegroom']; he remembered that Bob's father had once taken him home in his carriage. On Tuesday she went to see her 'socialist sister [Theodora] and her husband [Herman Heijenbrock]' on their farm and enjoyed her day with them more than she had expected to; they are very happy together and she admires their convictions though they do not convince her.

Returns to the letter next day, before going to meet [Alice and Herbert] Jones. Is sure Bob would be 'amused' to meet the socialist couple, but he [Heijenbrock] does not know English so it would be no good. Then went to stay with the aunt who lives nearby; she is not a 'favourite' in their house and they do not see her often, but several of her sisters see her often; the aunt was very friendly but it is never pleasant to be there. Fortunately her daughter, Bessie's cousin, was also there. Found her uncle and aunt fairly well when she returned, but the house is in 'a horrible state' due to the repainting, and they both have a slight cold. Went to the station to meet the Jones and they did not appear; English visitors 'always change their plans at the last minute or miss trains... or don't wire in time' as is the case for the Joneses, who are now coming tomorrow. [Harold] Joachim also cannot come to lunch and is calling in the afternoon. [Joseph] Joachim is staying tonight with Mr [Nicolaas] Pierson, the Finance Minister, and his wife, who has invited Bessie to a select party this evening. Is going to the concert tomorrow night with Alice Jones; the Röntgens may also come. The cellist [Robert] Hausmann is 'a charming person, so refined and artistic'; talked to him the other night and he admired Bob's ring. Bob will get this letter when he comes up to London to see his father. She thinks he should bring any work she has not seen on their honeymoon, as they might not have much quiet time before the wedding. Understands that his 'literary ambition is not connected with [his] love' and thinks this is right. Last half page with pillowcase measurements.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall and forwarded to him at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Will study the patterns Bob has sent her and send them to London, with her choice for his 'nuptial trousers' and travelling suit. Will speak again to her uncle about Bob's objections to writing himself to the consul [Henry Turing]. Entreats Bob for Sir Henry House and his wife not to be invited to the wedding breakfast: her uncle and aunt, who will send out the invitations, do not know the Howards at all so it does not matter that they are 'very distant relations', while their presence would give 'a different ton to the whole business' and make her miserable. It is also likely that Grandmont and Bramine would not come if the Howards were invited, due to their objection to 'jingos'. Does not see it as necessary to invite the Howards, unless Bob's parents wish it especially. Sometimes wishes they could marry 'quietly without anyone near', though knows it could be a lovely day with happy memories; wishes people could 'take it easier'. Returns to the letter after a walk with her aunt, who agrees with her about having to give up part of her musical interests after marriage; understand what Bob means, and thinks she may have expressed herself too strongly in her first letter [9/45], which is the 'wretched side of correspondence'; will wait until she sees him to discuss it. Sees what Bob means about Mrs [Helen] Fry's cigarette smoking; cannot quite feel as he does yet; knows she does have 'a great and natural tendency to rectilineal & rather exclusive argumentation'; hopes she can 'suspend judgment' as Bob says. Does not know enough about German literature to comment on what he says about German literature, but emphasises the advantage, 'which the English nation as a whole is slow & rare in acknowledging' of being able to talk to foreigners in their own language; as an example, it was a real shame that Bob and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen were unable to converse properly; this is why she was so disappointed when he once refused to learn as 'it seemed such an insular British way of looking at it'. Ordered the book [Stevenson's "The Suicide Club"] for Jan [Hubrecht] and he was very pleased. Mr Kattendijke and Mr Loudon are coming to make music this afternoon. Lula [Julius Röntgen] is recovering from his severe illness. Joachim is going to play with his quartet in Amsterdam next Saturday, and Mien has got her a ticket; will stay with Mrs Guye [or Guije], Gredel's mother; would love to go to the supper party the Röntgens are having for Joachim after the concert but expects Mien has too many guests to invite her. Is glad not to see Bob with his beard, and hopes he never decides to grow one. Asks who Jacobi is, and for Bob to tell him what 'the Cambridge Moore [i.e. George] thinks of his play.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia and forwarded to him c/o B. Berenson, 3. Via Camerata, Firenze. - Bob's last letter is one of his 'very nicest'. Her aunt has been much better again. Has paid some calls this afternoon, including to Mrs de Rhemen, Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht]'s Russian friend; the other old Russian lady [Countess van Rylandt] who knows Bob's parents was also there, and talked to Bessie about church music at Moscow; the rest of the visit was 'stupid & senseless' and Mrs de Rhemen's pet dog has given her a flea; they always come to her, so if she and Bob travel in Italy together he will be left in peace. Next morning, writes that there has been 'a great bustle' in the house as her gift of a 'fine old chestnut cabinet' was set up in her uncle's room; he will store 'all his papers & family reliques' in it as he did in the old one. Is disappointed and indignant that Mrs van Riemsdijk, having told her that they were not prepared to sell Tonina's violin but would let it to Bessie, which she declined knowing she would grow too fond of the instrument and did not want to insist since it had belonged to Mrs van Riemsdijk's husband, wrote to her aunt saying that Tonina had sold her violin abroad and wanted to keep this private. Will probably hear more about the matter from Ambrose [Hubrecht] 'who is her councillor and confident [sic]' and generally takes her side, but otherwise does not want to think about it; Bob's 'dear generous offer' of helping her buy it made the idea all the more precious, though the van Riemsdijks do not know that. Teases Bob for wanting to get back to England quickly to eat some 'beefy British dinners'; he will have a 'foretaste' of her 'dinner-ordering-capacities' when she comes, but she encourages him to stay a little longer if she is to cross on 14 Feb which now seems likely. Has forwarded two letters and a 'big Dorking one to Mr "Treveylan"; asks if this is Mrs Enticknap's spelling; admires her for adding 5 pence for postage abroad. Tells him to write from Florence.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Is returning two of the books lent her by Trevelyan, both of which she much enjoyed; had no idea the "Odyssey was 'such a wonderful human poem', and wishes she could read it in Greek; the translation is 'very melodious', asks whether Greek scholars approve of it. Found Henry James's "In The Cage" most amusing, though she asks whether 'the subtle suggestive analysis of the emotions & situations sometimes leads to a little mannerism in style'; thought it very clever, and 'a very English book'. Asks if she can keep [Sir George Otto Trevelyan's] "The American Revolution" longer as she has not yet begun it. Expects her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht?] has told him they will be glad to have him as early in September as he can come. Her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] is currently here; goes with her to Denmark for a month at the end of a month which will be 'a delightful dip into music again' as their Danish friends [the Noordewier-Reddingius family?] are very musical. Asks if Trevelyan has heard much this spring, and whether he has decided about Beyreuth. Trevelyan has been neglecting to mention [his own] "Mallow and Asphodel", which she has been enjoying very much; looks forward to reading his friend's poetry which he gave her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht?]. Is reading Keats' letters, through which '[o]ne gets to know the man very well'. Encourages Trevelyan to read a book translated from Swedish into English called "Antichrist Miracles" ["Antikrists mirakler "] by Selma Lagerlof; has 'heard it praised very much' and it is 'all about Taormina, though with different names', fears Mrs Cacciola [Trevelyan] is 'treated rather badly' but has not yet read it. Beautiful hot weather this week, 'just fit for lying in hammocks and reading' though it is easy to get last and 'even a little bicycling seems too much!'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Very pleased with Bob's 'beetle letter', which arrived yesterday; unfortunately when she kissed the creature to 'snatch off' his kisses it broke up, but she has put the pieces together and will 'keep him as a beautiful unicorn'. She and her uncle feel that it would be difficult for her to go to England before the middle of February due to her aunt's illness; will write to Bob's mother soon to tell her; seems natural that he should stay longer at Ravello; whenever he comes, she will not be able to spend as much time with him as before. He will have to send her his 'first journalistic work' as the Salomonson's cannot send her old numbers [of the "Manchester Guardian"] and she does not know where to get them. Says the beetle brought her nice dreams in which Bob was kissing her. Must re-read the poem by [Richard] Crashaw which he copied out for her. Pities Straughn Davidson [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson] for having to act as Bob's 'bucket' [see 9/101] and hopes he appreciated his 'rich breakfast' [of poetry]. Very glad Bob thinks her a good letter writer. Wishes she could persuade her family to get a night nurse, as her uncle's night is disturbed and yet he is not as helpful to her aunt as a trained nurse would be. Had a note from George [Macauley Trevelyan] inviting her to come to Cambridge next month; very kind of him to write, and she hopes they will soon go, though expects she will 'feel terrified'. Likes Bob's father's book ["The Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay"] very much, as well as Crashaw's poem; agrees there are some likenesses between the latter and Browning. Quotes from Dante's "Vita Nuova [xiv]'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very wintry weather; they were 'almost snowed up for three days' and the station could only be reached across the fields. The Runcimans have been here since Saturday; they are 'very pleasant young people' and she thinks Elizabeth would like Hilda, who was at St. Andrews and Girton and 'is very energetic and intelligent'. There is a shoot today; Mr [William?] Watson-Armstrong has joined them. Expecting a party of Charles and George's friends after Christmas, and hope to have 'three cheerful days' before leaving for Welcombe.

Returns to the letter on the following day; does not have an address so will send this to Ravello. Glad to hear that Elizabeth has had 'plenty of music at Amsterdam'. Pleased that Elizabeth's uncle liked George's article ["The White Peril", in "The Nineteenth Century"]. George is 'rather distressed about it' and would have written it 'with much greater care' if he had known it would attract so much attention; she thinks though that it has been useful. Asks if Elizabeth's uncle will soon return home; supposes he will not go south but stay there quietly for the winter. Sir George has now read "Polyphem[us & Other Poems]" carefully and will soon write to Robert. Hopes they had a pleasant time with Mr [Bernard] Berenson; asks how 'the ménage' goes on. Sends regards to Madame Palumbo and Mrs Reid wants to hear all about the Pension now as they know it. Has been very busy with Christmas presents, but all have been sent now. They think 'L[ord] R[osebery]'s speech helpful to a Peace [to end the Second Boer War]'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Elizabeth very much for the shawl; the weather is very cold here now so it will be most useful; hopes the storm is over for their crossing to the Netherlands. Would like to 'hear the truth about the Queen [Wilhelmina of the Netherlands]; she is very young and probably strong-willed, so there 'may have been some little friction between her & her husband to start the scandal'. Dr Ethel Williams lectured at Cambo yesterday and stayed the night with them; says that Mr [William] Scharlieb 'was a Eurasian, whom Mrs Sch. married in India, & that you see the type in the children'. Will put the money she owes Robert for the books [copies of "Polyphemus and Other Poems"?] into this letter. Sir George thinks it a very good plan for Elizabeth to learn Latin. Postscript notes that she has 'forgotten to send for the [money?] orders' so will have them put into a note for Robert at the Post Office.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert and Elizabeth are getting away very soon; not surprised they cannot settle down at home; Elizabeth will have much to do and she hopes she is strong enough. Glad 'some occupations' have been arranged at Ravello, as it is 'a little dull'; wonders how Robert will teach Latin. Sir George once tried to teach her, but she 'was so stupid that it was a failure'. Sweet of Elizabeth to make her a blanket but she must not trouble to finish it before she goes; likes tehm 'big enough to put round [her] back on cold nights' and will think of her when she 'cuddle[s] up into it'. Pantlin has gone to Newcastle to buy presents for the schools' Christmas trees; organising treats for children is always 'rather a bore' but they do enjoy them. The [Henry?] Willoughby Trevelyans are at Wallington for a night and the Spence Watsons will be there for Sunday; he will tell them 'all about Derby'. Hopes Elizabeth has read George's article ["The White Peril", in the "Nineteenth Century"]; asks her to show it to her cousin [Ambrosius Hubrecht] and his sons.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes all is well with Elizabeth and that they will soon be able to go on their travels as normal. Sir George was very pleased with their letters: it is a pleasure to help them, but 'nice to know [they] appreciate it'. Expects Robert's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] in every post. George has 'made a sensation by his article ["The White Peril" in
"The Nineteenth Century" Vol. 50, Iss. 298, (Dec 1901): 1043-1055]'. Sir George is quite well again; they are taking drives and walking in the pleasant weather, and she superintends '"improvements"' and is preparing for Christmas. Hopes Elizabeth has good news of her uncle; asks if he will be at the Hague for Christmas. Is going to get Charlie to dress up as Father Christmas to give the school children their presents. Going to Welcombe on 3 or 4 January. Asks if Robert and Elizabeth have decided on Ravello or somewhere nearer.

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