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Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to E.M. Young

Explains that he put off writing to Young until it had been decided whether or not Everett should be elected to 'the [Apostles] Society'. Announces that he had been accepted, and refers to him as 'a very clever man.' Refers to his declaration as 'very extravagant and Americans' and reports that 'old Martin was astonished.' States that now Trevelyan, Thompson and Jebb are gone down, a new and rather striking element is needed. Reports on recent discussions, including Trevelyan's speech criticising young men who give up their early ambitions and become schoolmasters. The latter being 'all for the edification of Fisher'. Remarks that Heathcote is 'still rather below the average of an Apostle but still he is improving.' Reports that there has been nothing heretical so far. Declares that he wishes to relieve himself of the charge of having recommended Goldwin Smith as a heretical work. States that it always gives him indigestion to read the Quarterly Review. Refers to the controversy between G. Smith and Mansel, which 'is rather metaphysical than theological'. Agrees with Young that illness has the effect of clearing away doubts. Declares that '[t]he Union is falling again rather'. [Incomplete]

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

States that he has been at Trinity College about a week, trying to write an article, but claims that he has been ill and shall probably be delayed. Does not think that solitary life agrees with his constitution, but clings to it because he believes that it helps him to concentrate his mind. Declares that he enjoyed his holiday very much, 'particularly the three weeks at the Lake [with G. O. Trevelyan and Edward Young].' Remarks that although he was happy in Dorsetshire, 'it was very melancholy being with poor Cowell', who is quite ill.

Reminds his mother of her invitation to [Charles Kegan] Paul to come to Rugby, and announces that he has asked him to come the following Easter. Does not know whether he will bring Mrs Paul or not. Asks her to send a volume of Fichte, and any books with library marks on them. Hopes to come to visit her on 3 October for a week. Explains that that is the day the Union Library opens and he wants to get some books 'before the country clergy have gone off with them all. Announces that it is thought that J. B. Mayor will be the new Professor of Moral Philosophy.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets to say that he will not see William the following week. Reports that the latter has written to say that he does not feel well enough to come to the 'Ad Eundem'. Informs her that the marmalade has arrived, 'and is very nice.' Asks her to tell Arthur that they 'lost "the whole ticket" at the elections to Council.' Does not think that it will much matter, and states that '[t]he questions which are coming to the front now in Academic affairs are not of a party character.' Regrets to see that the same state of affairs does not exist 'in the metropolis: and that the worst features of Parliamentary Elections are to be introduced into the Elections of school-boards in the Metropolis'. States that he allowed his name to be put on Miss [Garrett]'s committee for Marylebone. Has learnt that the elections are to cost about £1,000 per candidate, and Miss [Garrett], 'standing on principles of peculiar p[ ] will only spend £500.' Adds that it is 'a terrible waste of money.' Reports that Trevelyan has been there 'in a very triumphant and anti-military state.' Quotes Seeley on opposition to a reform. Asks her opinion of Myers' last poem in Macmillan['s Magazine]. Thinks it 'very fine', and remarks that Myers' ability 'to write anything so like Pope shows great versatility of style.' Adds that he is glad that she liked Catherine Symonds.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he is in the midst of scenery [in Carnarvon], 'which is not first-rate but very pleasing...', and comments on its similarity to the Lakes. Predicts that he shall enjoy himself much, as they have 'much exhilarating good fellowship and good talk at breakfast and in the evening: George Trevelyan, especially, being a well-spring of both.' States that he intends to be there for at least a week, returning to London probably early in September. Claims that he is behind with his work, and thinks that when the holiday is over, he shall have to work hard on till Christmas.

Asks her to thank their mother for her letter [101/176], which he intends to answer soon. Refers to [his cousin] Annie's remark as 'discriminative', and explains that the reason he chose to comment on 'that particular essay of Arnold's was not because it was the most impudent, but because it seemed the most complete and decisive enumeration of his theory of life.' States that he was glad to get Arthur's address, but does not think he will be sending a letter to him in Switzerland. Is glad to hear of her progress. Encloses 'a little poem' [not included], which he cut out of a magazine, and also 'a German effusion' of his [not included]. Advises her to get hold of Rückert's Selected works if she ever feels inclined to break new ground in German poetry. [Incomplete?]

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Asks Sidgwick if he has mastered Hegelian philosophy. Reminds him that they are all looking to him or John Mozley or both to tell them what he [Hegel] means. Remarks that [Septimus?] Hansard once said that 'he conceived his 'mission' was to translate Maurice to the people. Refers to W.D. Rawlin's 'funny voyage to America with Tom Hughes; remarks that '[w]hatever else it does for him it will probably deliver him from the [ ] represented by The Kiss of Peace.' Asks Sidgwick if he knows who wrote G[ ] Balz. Suspects that it might be Trevelyan, 'if it is not too good for the writer of C[ ].' Hopes to see Sidgwick at Christmas. Reports that he took Louis back to Eton, mainly in order that he may see Cornish, who, he reports, is quite well, and has not yet learnt the Gospel according to Matthew. Claims that it is not easy to have too many Cornishes, 'if they all take after their father.' [incomplete]

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Pleased that Elizabeth likes the idea of Booa [Mary Prestwich] coming up [to London to visit while she is having medical treatment]; Booa is also 'really pleased & touched', and will come to London on Monday to be there when Elizabeth arrives next day. Finds Sir George 'pretty well' but there is much to 'talk over & fix' so she cannot write a long letter. They are very interested in the advertisement [for Robert's book "Polyphemus and Other Poems"?] and glad all is going well. If she needed to telegraph, asks if she should do so to Westcott.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes all is well with Elizabeth and that they will soon be able to go on their travels as normal. Sir George was very pleased with their letters: it is a pleasure to help them, but 'nice to know [they] appreciate it'. Expects Robert's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] in every post. George has 'made a sensation by his article ["The White Peril" in
"The Nineteenth Century" Vol. 50, Iss. 298, (Dec 1901): 1043-1055]'. Sir George is quite well again; they are taking drives and walking in the pleasant weather, and she superintends '"improvements"' and is preparing for Christmas. Hopes Elizabeth has good news of her uncle; asks if he will be at the Hague for Christmas. Is going to get Charlie to dress up as Father Christmas to give the school children their presents. Going to Welcombe on 3 or 4 January. Asks if Robert and Elizabeth have decided on Ravello or somewhere nearer.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very wintry weather; they were 'almost snowed up for three days' and the station could only be reached across the fields. The Runcimans have been here since Saturday; they are 'very pleasant young people' and she thinks Elizabeth would like Hilda, who was at St. Andrews and Girton and 'is very energetic and intelligent'. There is a shoot today; Mr [William?] Watson-Armstrong has joined them. Expecting a party of Charles and George's friends after Christmas, and hope to have 'three cheerful days' before leaving for Welcombe.

Returns to the letter on the following day; does not have an address so will send this to Ravello. Glad to hear that Elizabeth has had 'plenty of music at Amsterdam'. Pleased that Elizabeth's uncle liked George's article ["The White Peril", in "The Nineteenth Century"]. George is 'rather distressed about it' and would have written it 'with much greater care' if he had known it would attract so much attention; she thinks though that it has been useful. Asks if Elizabeth's uncle will soon return home; supposes he will not go south but stay there quietly for the winter. Sir George has now read "Polyphem[us & Other Poems]" carefully and will soon write to Robert. Hopes they had a pleasant time with Mr [Bernard] Berenson; asks how 'the ménage' goes on. Sends regards to Madame Palumbo and Mrs Reid wants to hear all about the Pension now as they know it. Has been very busy with Christmas presents, but all have been sent now. They think 'L[ord] R[osebery]'s speech helpful to a Peace [to end the Second Boer War]'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Good to hear from Elizabeth [about Ravello]; sure 'the two elderly gentlemen' will be pleased to have them at meals; hopes she does not walk alone in 'very wild parts' because of 'wild dogs and uncultivated natives'. George has had his friend Robertson to stay and has just 'walked him off to Reedsmouth' in a downpour to meet his bag and go on to Carlisle. Has been busy with last arrangements and interviews; they leave by the early train on Thursday. Booa [Mary Prestwich] has left for Welcombe today. Sir George has been well recently but has just got a cold. Glad Elizabeth is going on with the translation, and looks forward to reading it; always thinks it 'foolish to spend time in translating french books, as everyone can read french', but very few people read Dutch. '[V]ery cheerful that the Liberals have 'won the Newmarket [by]election most triumphantly' [candidate Charles Rose]. Charles has not yet returned from Scotland; seems to be having a good time. Asks to be remembered to Mrs Reid and Madame Palumbo; asks if 'the old man at the Capucini at Amalfi' is still alive.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter from Palermo; the orange flower is still fragrant. Glad they are seeing so much of Sicily, and hopes she is now with her cousins [Bramine and Tuttie] at Taormina. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] club and will do in future. Sir George has finished writing his book ["The American Revolution"] and will soon start getting the proofs. He is very happy and seems 'so much better already'; he is seeing his friends, they are dining out 'moderately', and have had a few people to dinner. George 'seems to live in Committees and interviews about the ["Independent] Review'. Glad Elizabeth is having music, and that the Waterfields are happy. Excitement in London about a new young violinist, Marie Hall; the story is that 'some connoisseur' heard her playing on the street and trained her; has not yet heard her. Has a ticket near Elizabeth for Joachim's concerts; hopes they can go together often. Robert's play ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] not out yet. Sends love to Elizabeth's relations and the Cacciolas. Asks if she could call on Mrs Bayley, daughter-in-law of Sir George's old friend Sir Steuart Bayley, whose health is not good enough to live with her husband in India.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Thanks for the two letters; is glad that Janet is coming to see Elizabeth and will be very pleased if they can be real friends; hopes Robert will like her too. Elizabeth need not go to Pen Moel if she does not want to; sure Aunt M[argaret Price] would understand. Sorry to hear about Dr Cacciola's illness; Florence will be 'much alarmed'; good the nephew Elizabeth mentions is nearby. Booa [Mary Prestwich] thinks the picture must be at Elizabeth's house. Very hot here. George is coming back on Monday, quite suddenly, so 'everyone can be told [about his engagement]'. Very glad Elizabeth is having music; 'fancy quartettes in Dorking!'. Mrs [Kate?] Courtney asked her to meet Mrs Pierson, but she could not go that afternoon ; Sir George met him there at breakfast. They return to town on 8 June; asks if Robert is coming to the [Apostles'] dinner on 17 June. Wants to have a family party with all the Wards; asks if they could come on the 15th or 16th.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Her arrangements yesterday went well; left London after completing 'various businesses', went to a committee in Stratford then on to Welcombe where she found Sir George 'cheerful'. The weather is fine, and they hope for a good day on Saturday; '85 Birm[ingha]m Liberals have accepted. Enjoyed her visit to Elizabeth and Robert; they are 'so good & affectionate' towards her. The Mill house is 'very nice & quaint' and the little guest-room 'very pretty', but it is time they moved. Sir George thinks their plan a good way of 'getting a place to settle in' that they really like. The walk they took was lovely; is sure Leith Hill 'would be most attractive'. Will be in town from Monday to Wednesday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Originally enclosing a letter; does not think she answered Elizabeth's last as Sir George said he would write to say what they thought about the rent [to the Vaughan Williamses for the new house to be built at Leith Hill?]. Hopes Robert returned 'refreshed and well [from the Lakes]' and that she is not too bothered by 'the house business'; business arrangements with friends are always difficult. Hopes something will be settled at Leith Hill as it is such a beautiful place. Has had a letter from Janet [Ward] describing 'their interview with "the Master [of Trinity, Montagu Butler?]". He was very deaf, & George shouted, but his talk seems to have been very good'. She then walked fifteen miles with no ill effects: "Surely George has found the right wife!" 'The lady mother' [Mrs Humphry Ward] is coming to Wallington next week, as she is opening a school in Newcastle. They were expecting the Monkswells today, but [Lady Monkswell] is unwell and cannot come. Various young people are coming next month; asks if Elizabeth and Robert can come on 20 August for a week, returning on 1 September, or whether another time would suit them.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the visit to Chillingham, and that Mrs Cochrane plays well; seems to remember she is a 'better musician than Mrs Saxton Noble'. Hopes that the three weeks in the north have done her good. A 'big gathering of Liberal women' here yesterday, with a meeting then tea 'in the tent'. The shooting on Thursday was spoiled by a wet afternoon; Sir George has rheumatism in his hand. Janet 'very funny about the forgotten photograph'; she is 'a dear affectionate little person'. Keen to hear that 'the house business is prospering' and that the building of Robert and Elizabeth's house can start soon. Misses Elizabeth very much; was so nice seeing and 'nursing' her. Wants to hear about her trip to Holland, and what she decides about the violin.; also how the Enticknaps were. [John Joseph?] Nixon was 'much distressed' to miss Elizabeth and Robert. They have not yet finished [James's] "The Tragic Muse" as there has been little time for 'long reading'; has quite forgotten it and is interested to hear how it ends. Alone now till 21 September; Charlie leaves on Monday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - She and Sir George very sorry not to have Elizabeth and Robert next week, but understand that the journey is too long for a short stay. Most important that they get the house [at Leith Hill] 'well started'; Sir George also thinks it is wise not to travel in the cold weather if she has a cold. Hopes they will stay for [Charles and Mary's] wedding; they must stop if they are not leaving until January, and she wants to see them before they go. She and Sir George plan to travel to London on 29 December, but they are going on a visit from 1 - 4 January. Cannot ask them to stay at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] for the wedding, as Aunt Annie is coming, but they could take all their meals there. They are having a lunch party on the 6th before the wedding and would take them to the church and so on. Encourages them to come to town and leave for their travels the day after the wedding. The elections are 'very interesting' but she does not feel hopeful. A postscript saying that Aunt Margaret invites them all to dine with her on 5 January. Sir George sent a brace of pheasants yesterday, after a little shoot with Willoughby.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Elizabeth seems to have had more snow than they have at Welcombe. Will be very good to see her and Robert again; asks if they will stop a night on the way through London, or prefer to get home then come after they are settled. Is thinking of hosting 'a weekly dinner on Tuesdays in March, & a "small & early for MP's & young people afterwards'; Elizabeth and Robert must come to one. Henry James arrived last night and is 'most amusing & delightful on his American experiences'. Audrey T[revelyan] and the Bells are coming today. She and Sir George go to London on 23 February. Will give Elizabeth her club subscription when she returns; she will then have to make enquiries about which is the best club and change next year; Caroline thinks the Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] club has 'become very common & inferior'. Is glad Elizabeth saw Shelley's villa; the coast where Byron burnt his body is 'wierd [sic] & beautiful too'. Asks if she has read Mrs Shelley's "Life" of her husband, which Caroline thinks is better than [Edward] Dowden's. Mary has had to give up nursing Pauline, having done too much over the election and got run down. Charlie has accepted the position of Parliamentary Charity Commissioner, which is unpaid and not much work, but 'keeps him "in the running"'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to get Elizabeth's letter this morning and be able to tell Sir George the news [that she is pregnant]; he was 'most heartily pleased'. Asks if they could come for the day on Friday 18th, which Sir George prefers to Sunday 20th since he thinks fewer holiday makers will be returning home then. Robert is 'a bad boy not to write to Florence [Cacciola Trevelyan?]. Has seen Aunt Annie [Philips] today.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth had 'such a satisfactory interview with the nurse'; hopes she will engage her in good time. Aunt Annie [Philips] seems to have enjoyed her visit to Elizabeth and Robert and to like the house and the view, though thinks it will be damp in the autumn. Unlucky it was so wet on Sunday so she could not see the view from [Leith Hill] Tower. She and Sir George are going to Welcombe on Friday; C[harles ]and M[ary] are going to the Lakes today; Pauline will stay at Rounton not with the Trevelyans. Sure Elizabeth will enjoy her Sunday visitors, and the 'fresh air on [her] hill will be delightful' now the weather is getting hot. Wishes they could go north, but she has to be back on the 18th for the Fedn [Women's Liberal Federation?] meetings. Has told Maria [Springett?] that Elizabeth may want a bed [at Grosvenor Crescent] on the 6th, but is sure Elizabeth will write herself to her in good time.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Annie [Philips] is here for a fortnight; they went on Thursday to Holy Island, which was a long day but interesting; they enjoyed the drive over the sands and the view of Bamburgh from the island, the light on the water 'was just what excited Turner'. Today they are going to have a picnic tea at Sweethope Lake. Pantlin is beginning 'the flannels'; supposes Elizabeth likes the pattern she made for the others. The school children are coming tomorrow; Caroline is 'entertaining some High School mistresses on the 14th'; Mary and Pauline are coming for a few days at the end of the month. The Exhibition is on the third Saturday in August; they will probably have their party the following week; Caroline must also have a garden party this year. Must start thinking about visitors, so asks Elizabeth to say when she and Robert would like to come. They are hoping for news of Janet [who is due to give birth]. Annie is going to Sicily next winter.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Good that the little boy [Charles and Mary Trevelyan's son] 'arrived so promptly'; both he and Mary sound to be doing well. He is to be called George Lowthian. They are now concentrating their interest on 'the next event' [the birth of Elizabeth and Robert's child]. Plans to be with them by the 27 or 18 November, but Elizabeth must say if she wants her to come sooner, telegraphing if necessary. Glad Elizabeth's sister [Mien Röntgen] and the nurse are coming. Mary seems to have 'got through wonderfully well'. Sir George is 'hard at work again' after his visit to the Park [Annie Philip's house] and the shooting party. They have been arranging some Wedgwood china, which Aunt Margaret left to him, in the passage; she left Caroline 'a charming thimble in a box' and both thimble and china have 'family histories attached'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very glad for Elizabeth's letter; has been pleasant to think that 'while Mamma was away from me, she was with you, as I know how much you are to each other'. Has finished "Kipps" [by H. G. Wells] and likes it 'exceedingly'; it is very funny, but there is also a 'curious pathos about it'; thinks it in all ways better than "[Love and] Mr Lewisham" though that is good too. Has just started "Grub Street" [by George Gissing], which Elizabeth had read aloud. Is nearly 'out of Grub Street' himself as he has almost finished writing his own book.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sorry that Elizabeth is having such a long wait (before giving birth); glad she likes the nurse. Has been busy talking things over with Booa [Mary Prestwich]; went for a long walk with Sir George yesterday afternoon. Brief discussion of blanket patterns and knitting stitches. Glad Alice went to the dance, 'as now both the girls have had an outing'. Thinking having a tea party for the 'gardiners [sic] & people close here about' but they have not yet settled this; the 'school tree [or treat?]' is on 4 January. Sir George began work today; he is well, but whenever she returns after being away she 'can't help seeing how old he looks!'; he keeps up too many fires for Caroline's comfort. Hope Robert could talk to Mr [Donald] Tovey; supposes he will take on the work [the libretto for Tovey's "The Bride of Dionysus"?]. Hearne [the butler] went to a concert in the village last night 'with the girls' and says it was 'very good'. Sir George very indignant with the Lords; she is sure it is 'the beginning of a long struggle'. Glad Robert is reading aloud to Elizabeth.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Delighted to have the news of the birth of Elizabeth and Robert's son; wants to know how much he weighs and so on; hopes the labour was not too hard. Wonders if Robert 'has ventured to hold the baby'; he must start when it is small. The hounds [the local hunt] have been here this morning and she and Sir George went out to them; looked 'very pretty'. Asks whether they have decided the baby's name is to be Paul; Sir George likes it. Amusing to think of the 'three boy cousins' [with Theodore and George Lowthian Trevelyan] so close in age.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sure Elizabeth is glad to be in bed in this cold weather, though since there was sunshine yesterday and today she and Sir George have taken some walks. The nurse has kindly written a long letter with much she wanted to know about Elizabeth and Paul. Is very glad to hear the nursing [breastfeeding] has begun so well; Mary and Pauline were both 'troublesome' though the boys [Theodore and George Lowthian] were not. Longs to see Elizabeth and Paul but must wait, as both she and Sir George are going to be careful not to catch chills. Has been busy with the accounts, and has 'embarked on another large Vol. of Sorel'. Asks if Elizabeth has had visitors yet; sure Miss Noel will be delighted. Janet is coming on 7 January, and her mother the next day; 'rather alarmed' at the thought of having Mrs Ward for 'two whole days'. Asks if Paul has been out yet; likes the idea of him 'being carried up and down the Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst?] Terrace which is so sheltered & sunny'. Long holiday at Stratford, with Christmas, bank holiday and local holiday; there has been tobogganing on the hill behind the house, and the pond will soon be frozen enough for skating.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - She and Sir George quite taken up with the elections; glad Charlie's is over [at Elland] and that though his majority was reduced it is still very good; expects 'a body of Socialists' voted against him though they could not run their own candidate. Wishes Charles would rest now, but thinks he will help other candidates. The poll at Stratford is as good as could be expected. Is recovering gradually; goes for a short walk every day; will be well enough to visit Elizabeth on 1 February. Glad Elizabeth thoroughly like[s] Nurse Catt; asks if Nurse Godwin comes on the 28th. Very interested in the results of the election for Elizabeth and Robert's constituency [Reigate]; fears it will be a 'hard fight'. Hopes Madame Grandmont is better. Asks whether she should come via Reading or through London.

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