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Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Menaggio. - Glad that Elizabeth is better, and had 'a satisfactory interview with Mrs Scharlieb'; they were also interested in the Dorking meeting; parts of 'Mr G. M.'s letters' appeared in the newspapers; glad that Robert took a share in proceedings. It is lovely here, and they have spent a 'lazy day' sitting with Aunt Margaret in the garden and going with her and Lionel on the Lake [Como]; Margaret is much better. They are thinking of going to Baveno for a few days on Monday. Spent a day at St Moritz on the way, which she did not like much; it also rained heavily when going up there and down the Maloja [Pass], but they have otherwise had good weather. Mrs Humphry Ward has had to leave in answer to a telegraph about her brother [William Arnold], whom she thinks Elizabeth has met though she herself has never done so; fears there has been 'some fatal turn to his illness'. Sir George is well, and Booa thinks Italy is 'wonderful'; she agrees it is very beautiful, and 'even the great number of houses & villas on the banks cannot spoil it. Hopes that the building [of Robert and Elizabeth's new house] can now begin. Sends birthday wishes, though apologises for forgetting the exact date. Hopes the opera was good, and that 'the invalid at Cumberland Place' was better; Mary 'seemed so kind about her'.

Letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Thanks Sir George for his letter; delayed answering it for a few days as they wanted to see their architect [F. A. Richards?]. They went over the site with him yesterday; he seemed to think the work was 'progressing very satisfactorily', and that the next bill might be due some time next month. They would therefore be 'very grateful' to Sir George if he could 'pay in the other £500'. She will have to see about 'providing for the rest in the course of next month'. The walls of the ground floor are up and the first floor is now being raised; the architects are pleased with the builders and think them 'careful workers'.

It was 'most interesting' to go over the site with the architect and "Miss [Margaret] Waterfield, a great gardening authority': they 'roughly planned the laying out' and decided what should be done before the winter. Miss Waterfield was 'delighted with the view and the site & thought it might gradually be made into something very beautiful & original, as the ground is so irregular & full of beautiful trees'.

They were 'very sorry to hear about Mrs Thompson's accident [see 11/153]; wishes she could go over and play the violin to her 'while she is laid up which might cheer her'. Sends her love and Robert's.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains the delay in sending a copy of Roden Noel's poems [not included]- to her. Asks if she has seen his review in the Spectator, which, he claims, was written 'with a sincere effort at rigid impartiality', and therefore has not altogether pleased the poet.

Claims that he has not been able to find out anything for the advantage of Mrs Horton, and that he cannot [hear] of the school his mother mentions [see ADD.MS.c/101/181], and asks if it is Clapton. Discusses the boy [Fred Horton]'s educational future, and suggests that if he could not get a scholarship at Rugby, he probably would not be able to obtain an exhibition. Promises to talk about the situation with her when he comes to visit, which he hopes will be 'about Thursday week - if not, the Sunday following.'

Asks her to tell him by return of post what Arthur is going to do at Easter, and whether he may ask Trevelyan to come down for a day while Arthur is there. Claims that he is not over-working. Reports that he suffered from some sleeplessness at the beginning of the term, and that he does very little work in the evenings. The consequences, he claims, are that he neither wants nor can afford a holiday, and wants time to prepare his lectures for the following term. Asks her to send him William's address.

Undertakes to bring 'Lowell's new volume' with him, and remarks that 'the "commemoration ode" is, on the whole, splendid', and judges that it ought to appear in any collection of English Lyrics. With regard to the word 'English', remarks that it must now become designative of race and language, not of polity, and that they must now call themselves 'as opposed to the Americans, Britons.' Remarks that 'Mary [Benson?] has subsided into silence', and does not think she is studying either algebra or political philosophy. Reports that Mrs Kingsley asked after her the other day.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Was very glad that Robert went to the funeral; there is an 'immense gap' since [Sir George's sister] Margaret's 'vitality, and power of interest made one forget how long she had been very ill'. Charles and Mary went to Rounton [Grange] this morning; Janet, George, and their babies [Mary and Theodore]. A huge search-party was out for 'old Thompson', the farmer-shepherd at Harwood, who was nearly blind and got lost on 'Friday week, the first of the hot days'; Charles got fifty 'navvies from the water works' to join in; Harwood was eventually found drowned in Fallowlees Loch. It would not have been right to shoot Harwood moor, and the game were scattered over the county by the searchers; Sir George went shooting for the first time yesterday and did well; will shoot Catcherside next Monday. Has bought the twelve volumes of the "Yellow Book" in the original covers; asks if he has had a bargain. Glad that the Water Lane is being done to Robert and Elizabeth's satisfaction.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Strange and 'rather a bore' writing 1900. Has received Bessie's 'almond-bearing letter' [see 9/23]; remembers walking under other almond trees with her. Is going to put a bad dream into his play; is getting on slowly but quite well with it. Much relieved by a letter from [Lina] Duff Gordon; wrote to her saying he probably should have told her of his feelings for Bessie but explaining why that had been difficult, and that he was pained to think their friendship could not be the same again; she replied after a while with no mention of the misunderstanding, just writing 'the letter of one intimate friend to another'. He had promised to write a poem about the pet bat who visits her every winter, and she wrote down the bat's name as a reminder [cf. "The Lady's Bat"]. May have been unfair to Mrs C. [Mary Costelloe], but she certainly talked about him and Lina Duff Gordon 'in a way she had no right'; will try to avoid her, but it is difficult to see [Bernard] Berenson, whom he likes very much, separately. Berenson has written, and 'rather reproached' him for not visiting him at Florence on the way down; he is alone now as Mrs Costelloe has gone to London because her husband is dying. Bob may stop a couple of days on the way back, since Berenson is not coming to England this year; 'he rather feels neglect, and has been extraordinary kind' to Bob, though he 'is difficult at times'. Will not decide until he knows when he is coming to Holland. Continues the letter next day, Has not yet heard from his mother about whether he and Bessie should cross the Channel together. Thinks it would probably be best for her to stop at Grosvenor Crescent for a night on the way to Welcombe, but that can be determined later. Hopes she and Paul and Marie [Hubrecht] will persuade Willy van Riemsdijk not to go to Africa. Sorry that her aunt has such a bad cold; teases Bessie about learning cooking and 'fortifying [herself] against evil times in the barbaric isle, where neither foreign languages not [sic] the dressing of vegetables are understood'. Other people have also found his father's book difficult, and of course she knows little of British 'history or... parliamentary jargon'. Mr Straughn Davidson [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson?] , an Oxford don whom he rather likes, is coming at the end of the week

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Good to hear Julian is doing well; she and Sir George will visit on 20 October; not sure how much she will be doing in London, since she wants to see pictures and perhaps go to the theatre, so may not stay the night. Must be very interesting to see Mr [Donald] Tovey at work; sure Elizabeth will help him a little 'by "intelligent sympathy"'. A postscript notes that she 'must remember the homespun [?] next year'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - He and Bessie went over to the house yesterday with Mr [F. A.?] Richards, the architect, and Miss [Helen Margaret?] Waterfield, a 'garden specialist', to get ideas about the garden; they will probably have to do some planting and digging next month 'to make a beginning'. Work on the house had 'got on very fast', and the roof will be begun in two or three weeks; they hope this will be 'before the rains come'. Bessie is telling Sir George about the payments, which will be due earlier than Richards had thought. Before they go abroad, they will have to 'make arrangements for selling what stock is necessary for the rest'.

The weather has been 'very fine for some time', but is more unsettled now. Neville Lytton, the painter, is coming over today from Horsham. Wishes his mother could have seen Lytton's exhibition in London this summer; he 'is certainly among the most promising young artists nowadays', and Robert thinks some of his watercolours especially good. Does not care as much for some of his oils, but there is 'always something interesting in them too'; perhaps some of Lytton's admirers 'praise his work too highly', but Robert is sure he will 'do very well in the end'. He is a 'great friend of Fry' who is older and has 'helped him a great deal' with advice. [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is also coming to lunch today. Fry says he will come on the day of the Dolmetsch concert if he can; Mrs Fry, who 'has had scarlet fever very badly, is getting better, despite a severe attack of rheumatic fever'.

Bessie may well go abroad for about a week on the 29th, after the concert. They have not yet heard from her young friend Hylkia [Halbertsma] whether she can come abroad with them, but they hope she can: she 'would be a very good companion for Bessie, and she is a nice and clever girl'. They are looking forward to seeing Caroline next month in Dorking or London. Sends love to his father, and to G[eorge] and J[anet], whom he hears are at Wallington.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very interesting to hear about Mr Tovey [see 8/147, letter from Duncan Crookes Tovey to Robert]; suspects that Macaulay was quoting Pope directly. Glad to have Robert's account of the [Apostles'] dinner, and that he spoke; thoughts on preparing for speeches and speaking ex tempore. His finger is improving. Gave Robert's message to Aunt Annie [Philips], who is well and looking forward to her tour of Italy and Sicily. Glad Bessie likes his "Greek War" ["An Ancient Greek War", a piece in his "Interludes in Verse and Prose"]; at least the 'extreme elaboration' of the piece differentiates it from the rest of the considerable literature on those times. Pleased to hear of a measure condemning Boriell's [?] Bill at a large meeting at Smithfield being defeated 'by an enormous majority' after an 'excellent speech by Mr Harper'

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Perfect recent weather; has done 'a fair lot of work' and thinks he is 'well started' on his new play about 'a man who comes back from the Crusades and finds his enemy in occupation of his castle'. [C.P] Scott, editor of the "Manchester Guardian", has asked him to send an account of the landslip disaster [at the Cappuccini hotel]; if Scott prints his letter he will show it her, as his 'first and perhaps... last attempt at journalism'. The accounts of the landslip in the papers are 'greatly exaggerated'; Bessie need not worry about him. Once read a review of [Kenneth Grahame's] "The Golden Age" by Swinburne, 'with more than his usual extravagance of praise'; was rather disappointed when he read some of it soon after. Fry's sister Isabel has written 'a somewhat similar book, but with no pretentions', which he thinks is worth 'twenty golden ages'; it is called "Unitiated" and he will get it for Bessie to read; Isabel Fry is very nice, and a little like Bessie in temperament. Will lend her [Stephen Philips'] "Paolo and Francesca"; does not think much of it. Is too lazy to copy out verses, as he promised. Agrees that it is wonderful to think of going out for dinner together; not that either of them do that much, but in moderation it is very good, and he has never dined out enough for the 'novelty of it to be spoilt' as it is for her uncle. Teases her about her dreams. Is sure with her uncle and Lord Reay's advice they will be able to arrange their marriage properly; they should have as few formalities as possible, and avoid being married again in England if they can; would like the date to be as soon as possible, in June, but she should decide. Notes that this is the last letter he will send dated 1899, and '1900 will look awfully odd'.

Very interested by her description of her childhood; Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is certainly ' not the sort of person to have understood [Bessie] at all'; he had something of the same difficulty with Charles, who however tried to be sympathetic and a good brother to him; Charles 'had a sterner and more orderly temperament' and Bob 'the more haphazard one'. George is 'a sort of cross' between the two, but with much more intellect than Charles. Encloses a letter from Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; knew she had taken a fancy to Bessie; 'her staccato style is admirably expressive. She does it in conversation often'. Had said in his letter that his parents might visit Sicily next winter and she might possibly see him with them and Bessie next year. Has nearly finished reading [Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant"; thinks it 'a most remarkable novel' though it does drag in places. Calls the muses her 'real rivals, my dear nine mistresses'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - She and Sir George are disappointed that Elizabeth is not coming, but she is right to go to her sister; hopes it will cheer Mien [after the death of her daughter Amanda], and sends her sympathy. Must arrange to meet on Elizabeth's return; she and Sir George go to London on 11 April, and go abroad in five weeks. Is planning an afternoon party for young people, both married and unmarried, and asks if Elizabeth could help with some music. Has had a letter from Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht], who does not think La Croix suited Elizabeth as well as Ravello; hopes she is well. Wonders where Robert and his friends [on G. E. Moore's reading party?] have gone; G[eorge] and J[anet] are walking in Cornwall until Tuesday; they then come to London and go at once abroad. Aunt Margaret has had influenza; Caroline and Sir George are pretty well.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Looking forward to seeing Robert and Elizabeth at Wallington. Robert must be having a good time with [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson 'in such scenery and circumstances'. Glad about 'the Water-lane'. Charles and Mary will be at Cambo for a good part of their visit. Must read [Aristophanes's] "Thesmophoriazusae" again; remembers [Charles] Vaughan saying 'how much he liked the three female comedies'. Is entering Macaulay's marks in his favourite Cicero speeches in the Dolphin [edition]; has already done this for the Terence. Miss Richardson has again got 'three County Council scholarships... not bad for a school of 60 children'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Thanks his father for his letter [12/76], and the '[obituary] notice of the poor silent fogey [Sir Joseph Crosland]'. Remembers the fogeys, and the amusement they gave, very well, but not where they met them; has a 'vague recollection that it was at some English sea-side hotel, perhaps in Yorkshire', but it may well have been abroad. Expects Crosland 'felt very much out of place in the House, and may have been glad to be turned out'; he 'seemed a kindly old fogey', and Robert can 'well believe that, in the stately phrase of the Times, he was "generous to a degree"'.

His father's letter to Paul [Hubrecht] has just arrived and will be forwarded; thinks they [Paul and his brother Jan] both much enjoyed their visit to Wallington; Jan was here for two days, and they went over to the site on Sunday with him. The foundations [of Robert and Elizabeth's house] are about finished, and as far as can be judged the work seems very good; they will meet the architect there soon to make some plans about the garden, which will not be big but require thought as it is 'all on a slope'.

Has left [Turgenev's] Dmitri Roudine at Wallington; asks if it could be sent back to the library once his father has done with it. He and Bessie are both very well, and much enjoyed their time at Wallington 'in spite of the doubtful weather'; it was an 'additional pleasure to see Charles and Molly so happily settled'. Hopes his father is still getting on as well with his book; liked reading the two sections he gave him, and 'thought them everything that could be desired'. Bessie thanks both Robert's parents for their letters, and will 'write directly'; they both send their love.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Beautiful weather; they have always taken their tea outside and sometimes gone for a walk after dinner. They were very sorry to hear about Arthur [Llewelyn] Davies; [his diagnosis with cancer] is a 'sad blow' for his brother and sister and Sir George is 'much grieved' for Arthur himself. Was worth missing the dentist to have seen the Lancaster Churchmen. Glad the [Apostles'?] Dinner has 'got back to Richmond'; 'So old an institution should be kept up in all its parts'; was told recently that the Society had 'come to an end at the University'. He and Caroline are driving out to Broadway, seventeen miles away, today; on Thursday they entertain the Corporation [of Stratford on Avon] and 'people in any public position' and are expecting a hundred and sixty guests. Likes thinking of Robert and Elizabeth in 'that beautiful eyrie' [The Shiffolds]. Notes in a postscript that their guests were 'astonished' by the beauty at Welcombe, 'as they always are'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Seatoller. - Thanks his mother for her letters, and for the Times [Literary] Supplement. The article on Petrarch was interesting; he is a 'gentleman' Robert knows little about, and though the article was good it does not make him 'particularly anxious to be further acquainted with him, at least with his poetry'. The weather has generally been good, and he has got on 'fairly' with his work. Was 'very sorry about Searle [his death] though... expected it'.

Sent on his mother's letter to [Roger] Fry: 'unfortunate that it is a pastille', as they are 'rather difficult to deal with' and he doubts 'travelling improves them; if Fry thought he could do anything Robert could possibly take it with him when he goes South [see also 13/21]. Supposes George does not want him to read more proofs [of England under the Stuarts]; of course if he does, Robert would have time and willingness to go through more at Wallington. Hears Aunt Annie will be there, which will be nice.

Has little to say, as 'nothing happens here'; Bessie will arrive on Friday, and seems well. Hopes both his mother and father are well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

Thanks his parents for their letters. The [cricket] match began yesterday and will go on until Tuesday. Thinks the picnic will be on Friday. Will send his mother four roses he has got in his garden. Mrs Bartlett [the matron] says the medicine has 'put some colour' into his face and he should go on taking it. Has caught three caterpillars; 'Levson' [Granville Leveson-Gower ?] says he thinks they are peacocks, so Robert has given them away since they are common and small. His other caterpillars seems to be doing well; people think it will turn into a moth. Mr Arnold says the back board has made Robert's back straighter already, that he is fourth out of five in arithmetic and was bottom in French last week but is now second. Is working alone in Latin to 'get up' his grammar. Goes to bed late now, and gets up late.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Glad that the Hardys [G. H. Hardy and his sister?] have arrived. Caroline mentioned La Croiz to the Arthur Elliots, as they are going to the Riviera at Easter, but could not tell them whether there were 'good drives' which is important as he is 'very lame'. The last days before [George and Janet's] wedding are most exciting; the Wards are 'wonderfully energetic' and their arrangements go well. Went to see the presents yesterday; there seemed to be almost as many as C[harles] and M[ary] had, though there were fewer presentations and large things. Janet had 'some very nice offerings from her girls, & many servants & poor people'; lots of books, silver, cheques; Janet's trousseau was 'nice and useful'. Hopes the weather at Oxford will be good. Caroline, Sir George and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going down before the special train to be at the registry. She and Sir George have not been well; thinks Sir George was doing too much, so he is resting. The Duke of Cambridge has died, so there will be no question of going to Court tomorrow; is glad as it 'seemed so inappropriate'. Has a note from [Bramine Hubrecht at] Taormina saying that the things have been sent; hopes they will arrive soon. Hopes the concert went well. The H[enry] Y[ates] T[hompson]s 'would be sorry not to be able to stop'. They [the Liberals] have won another [by] election, and 'the Gov[ernment] are in a poor way'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Was judging at the Exhibition on Saturday; 'Sunday we went to Church!'; Sir George read his chapter to her for two hours on Monday. Elinor Middleton, Kenneth Swan and 'M. Burnett' have been staying with them; tomorrow it is the tenants' party. Sir George was very pleased to have Julian's photograph; intends to come to see him in the autumn. Theo and Humphry have had measles and are recovering; Mary shows no sign of it; the children's visit may be delayed a little but George comes on the 31st. The [Henry Yates] Thompsons visit soon. Pleased to have good news of Julian; would like to see a photograph of him in the donkey cart. Hopes they are enjoying Mr [Donald] Tovey's visit and that he is better.

Continues the letter after having been interrupted by Mary and her guests Mr and Mrs Runciman, then 'the children with the poney [sic]'; Pauline is 'beginning to ride nicely'. Has read Rosalind Murray's The Leading Note, which is 'nice and simple, but a girl of that age does not know enough to write a novel'. Hopes Robert is enjoying having 'Ariadne clothed and adorned [by Tovey's composition of the score of The Bride of Dionysus].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will be happy to 'write a line' [a reference] for Elizabeth's nurse but needs to know her name. Hopes Elizabeth is feeling the cold less. Sir George has had 'a sharp attack of "Rheumaticks" making him quite lame', but he is much better this morning. Agrees about Miss Martin, who is 'so sterling and always... to be depended on'; Elizabeth will see how good she was with children, as she 'never played on their feelings, as so many governesses do, but kept them in order quite naturally'. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is very busy but 'seems cheerful'; Caroline took her for a drive and walk yesterday which she enjoyed. Hopes the game arrived safely. Robert should have the five copies of his book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] 'sent direct as if from him'; they are looking forward to seeing it. Glad Elizabeth liked the blotter and hopes she will use it; sorry that she still has to go on with treatment but at least she can do it herself; expects she will 'find the day long enough getting up later for another week'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Has been unwell and 'laid up', but is now better. [George and Janet's] wedding seems very near; wishes Elizabeth and Robert could be there. George is busy going over his book ["England Under The Stuarts"] with [Charles] Oman, and she thinks all but the last chapter will be finished before the wedding; he is taking a few days in the country from tomorrow. Charlie was 'triumphantly returned' for the North[umberland] C[ounty] C[ouncil] but looks tired; worries about him taking on more work. Mary looks very happy. Glad Elizabeth saw her 'pretty friend [sic] Mrs Salamon' [Jeanne Salamonson Asser] and had some music; Robert also writes that the Hardys [G. H. Hardy and his sister?] have come. Hopes Elizabeth gets to visit the Netherlands before returning to England. Looking forward to getting the things from Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]; hopes there is a good reason for their sale at Taormina. Elizabeth must come to stay at Welcombe while Robert goes to his friends [G E Moore's reading party] if they are back in England by then. Sir George is reading newspapers each morning at the British Museum, which 'he hates doing'; he will finish this week. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is 'very beaming over George', and all [wedding] arrangements are going well.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Thanks Robert for the books and for his letter which answered some questions of interpretation; went to the Hertford House collection [the Wallace Collection] to look for arms and armour of Chaucer's period, but there were 'none to speak of'. Sends love to Elizabeth; "The Lost Stradivarius" [by J. Meade Falkner] is an 'amazing production'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Seatoller, Borrowdale, Keswick. - Thanks his mother for her letter. The weather has not been so good recently, but any rain has been brief. Bessie seems 'very well at Rottingdean [where she is visiting her friend Jeanne Salomonson]' and is coming here on the 5th; wonders if it would suit for them to come to Wallington around the 13th or 14th, but expects Bessie will be writing about this. Does not think he will finish his play here, but will read it to her if she likes; will at least have done more than half of the final act.

The new Slade Professor is 'a certain Walstein [Charles Waldstein, later Walston]; he has held the position before and 'proved his incompetence'. He is 'the most notorious snob in Cambridge, far out-doing the O. B. [Oscar Browning], and a quite odious man as well''. Thinks his father met him recently there, and 'did not get a good impression'. Seems that it was settled that Fry should have the professorship, but 'at the last moment Poynter and Walstein, who is a great intimate with royalty, got it settled their way instead. Everyone is very angry': Sidney Colvin 'is said to be quite furious'.

That is a 'personal matter', and Robert only knows one side, but 'the bigger issue is really important'. Almost 'all the merit and intelligence among both artists and students has for a long time 'been outside and opposed to the [Royal] Academy', and yet the Academy has 'enormous power in many directions'. The 'Chantrey Bequest affair' is of 'secondary importance' in itself, but may 'serve as an occasion to break their power'. Certainly not the case of only a narrow clique '(the New Eng[lish Art Club, for instance) that is hostile to the Academy, but all who care strongly about art'; nor is the hostility 'a personal attack on Poynter, who is more intelligent than most of them', and Robert believes him to be 'a perfectly straight man according to his lights'.

Has a gun at Wallington, though may have 'Bowen's gun [which came to Robert after E E Bowen's death] sent there' from Westcott. Should have said that it is 'now really settled' about their house: the clearing of the site was to start last week, it is due to be finished by February 20 [1905], with the roof being on by 20th November [this year]. They are 'very glad all the bother is over'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Trevelyan

The 'elections must be getting exciting now, for they are so near'. Sorry to hear 'Uncle Harry' [Holland] is ill, and hopes he recovers soon. The Eton match is tomorrow. Robert is doing the same Greek and Latin work as before. [Sackville?] West beat Robert in Greek, but Robert beat him in Latin and thinks he can do so in Greek next half term if he tries hard. Thinks he gets on worst with his Greek Prose [composition], and does not always find Latin Prose easy though he 'like[s] it on the whole'. Sends thanks to his mother for her letter. Hopes it will be a 'hard winter', as he wants to learn how to skate properly. Finds the translation of the Odyssey which Mr A[rnold] lent him 'very interesting'; has read four books, and would have read more but does not have much time. G[eorgie] is 'getting on very well', and seems to have done well last half term.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

Was 'made a walker alone' last Monday, as were Bramwell, [Frederick Pethick] Lawrence, Holt and Whitelaw; walked with Smith and Whitelaw today. Mr Viner has lent him "The Ladies in Parliament" [written by Robert's father]; thinks "Horace at Athens" is 'so funny'. They will have fun at Eastbourne at Easter. Is getting on well. Wrote to Grandpapa P[hilips] and to Archie this morning. They went to church this morning.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Seatoller, Borrowdale, Keswick. - Thanks his mother for her last letter. Is glad she met [Herbert James] Craig, who is an 'excellent person', who was in Scrutton's chambers when Robert was there. [Henry Francis] Previté is a 'great friend of his' and says he is 'really a first-rate candidate'. Robert would 'like to see him again very much'.

The weather has been 'excellent', with just one stormy day. Bessie seems to be getting on very well at Rottingdean with Mrs Salomonson, and is 'probably going to bathe'. Expects Dowden's [biography of Robert] Browning 'would be dull. Chesterton's is certainly lively' though it 'annoyed [Robert] very much': thought Chesterton 'said all the wrong things it was possible to say about Browning as a man of letters, and in fact entirely showed himself up as a critic'; he was 'more interesting about Browning as a man, but even there was exaggerated and paradoxical'. Admits this may not be fair, as he 'never can stand Chesterton'.

Has a 'few scanty notices of the Chantrey bequest committee' in his newspaper; the [Royal] Academy's defence 'has certainly been a fiasco, as it was bound to be'. Hopes 'the whole gang of them will get thoroughly discredited at last', as until that happens there is 'no hope of any adequate recognition of what is really good in modern art', or reform of the mismanagement of the National Gallery. Poynter 'has just succeeded in swindling Fry out of the Slade Professorship', as he thinks he has already told her; this is 'only one instance of the fatal power for evil that his gang possesses'.

Is getting on with his own work, 'rather slowly "eppur si muove"'; his father is also getting on with his, doubtless a little faster.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

Thanks his father for his letter. Thinks G[eorge] is happy and 'quite at home' [at Wixenford]. Mr Arnold has told Robert to ask Charlie how much he will have to know when he goes to Harrow; wrote to him a few days ago. Likes the Virgil and Euripides' "Iphigenia" very much. Hears that Welldon has been chosen for Harrow [as headmaster]; hopes he is a 'nice man'. He and George are getting on well in their work. Asks his father to thank his mother for her letter and the umbrella. Tomlin 'took Up[p]er Shell'. [Nugent] Hicks is going to Harrow next term. Has written to Grandpapa T[revelyan]. Sends love to all, 'Spider included'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Hears that snow has fallen on some parts of the Riviera, and wonders whether Elizabeth and Robert have seen any. [George and Janet's] wedding is near, and the arrangements all seem to be made; she, Sir George, Charles, M[ary] and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going early and will be at the Registry Office; the others are coming by a special train and will go to the college [Somerville?]; some people think the arrangements 'very queer' and others 'are enthusiastic about the novel kind of marriage'. She herself thinks it will be nice, and wishes Elizabeth and Robert could be there. George and Janet are going to a farm house in Surrey where the Wards used to spend their summers for ten days, and will then go abroad after having seen the furniture put into their house. Wonders when Elizabeth and Robert will return and whether the 'road [to their new house] business will be settled'; supposes they will want the building to begin as soon as possible. The clergy made 'most violent efforts against the progressives' in the London County Council election, but made little difference to the numbers. No one is sure whether there will be a general election soon; the government is 'absolutely discredited' and many of their own party are talking 'openly against them'. Emily Hobhouse has been to tea with her, having just returned from the Transvaal; Caroline is glad that she is to have a testimonial given her. They are going to Welcombe for about a fortnight on 29 March, then will return to London before they go abroad at Whitsun. Sir George is well, and 'reading busily for Vol IV [of "The American Revolution"].

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - They enjoyed their visit from Elizabeth; thinks she will have a fine passage; there is 'something always exhilarating about [her relations] the Hubrechts' who 'take life so joyously and seriously at once'. Caroline is much better; they are going to Welcombe for a fortnight tomorrow. They saw "The Man From Blankney's" [sic: actually Blankley's] which was a 'good piece of fun', but not as good as [Guthrie's] 'dialogue in "Punch"'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - Has been out most of the day since there was some sunshine, and has written a few lines. Seems that old [Pasquale] Palumbo is 'in great danger'; has offered to move to another hotel for a week or two, but Pasquale's wife will not hear of it; she 'takes a sort of mother's care of him' and says the rooms of the Albergo Toro will be damp. Will stay for a while, but does not think he should stay if Palumbo gets worse; only Italians go to the Toro but sure he would be all right there. Has just received Stephen Philips' play about Paolo and Francesca; cannot see as much in it as 'many very clever people do'; it has 'effective theatrical scenes' and 'some rather fine poetry', and if it succeeds when acted next year it will make things easier for [Thomas Sturge] Moore and [Laurence] Binyon, and for himself, if he manages to finish a verse play, but it is still a bad play. Recommends that she read "Romeo and Juliet" and the "Merchant of Venice" if she has not already; thinks he should charge her a fee in kisses for giving her literary advice. Finishes writing for the day with a doggerel verse recommending that she wear socks in bed to keep warm.

Returns to the letter the following evening; glad she got on so well with the dentist, and 'recognises her portrait' in [Chaucer's] Merchant's Wyve. Hopes she will send her photograph soon. Found her account of 'the Russian ladies [Madame de Rhemen and Countess van Bylandt] and Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht; see 9/17]' very entertaining. Does not remember the Comtesse de Bylandt, but will ask his parents about her. Teases her for dreaming that she was married to [Bram] Eldering. Palumbo seems better today. Weather fine today, and he has got on well with his play; 'cannot get along in the rain'. Also thought of a new poem on Elijah in the desert, but might not write it now. Hopes to get over a month of work done, and not to return before the end of January; his mother has just written that she would like Bessie to stay with them at Welcombe early in February; thinks that would be the best plan, so he would probably not spend more than a few days in Holland on the way back; does not know whether it would be considered right to travel back together so she should ask her uncle and aunt.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - They 'rejoice with' Robert at Roger Fry's success [his appointment as Curator of Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]; glad that Robert will not lose his friend but see so much of him when he comes to England. Thinks Fry's father [Sir Edward] did a 'very fine thing' in returning money [part of his remuneration, to the Metropolitan Water Board] the other day; the 'disinterestedness' it demonstrated has much declined recently. Glad that Campbell-Bannerman's government has taken the step of 'revindicating honesty and public spirit'; was 'disgraceful' of Balfour to reverse the last Liberal government's veto on [ministers] keeping directorships. Agrees with Robert in looking forward to the parliamentary session, especially to the Budget. Sir George and Caroline want to give Robert and Elizabeth a 'minute interest in the Budget' by paying them fifty pounds twice a year instead of making good the income tax on their allowance. Went to the British Museum on Saturday and found a 'Liberal atmosphere' everywhere in London; Welby and Sir Courtenay Ilbert 'seemed to breathe very freely in it'. Has finished Catullus and will read the "[Appendix] Virgiliana" today.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S. W. [London] :- Thanks his parents for their last letter; they are in town again, as Bessie needs to go to rehearsals for her last concert [with Arnold Dolmetsch] on Wednesday. The concerts have 'gone of very well so far', though Robert was unable to attend the last one since it was on the 'evening of the [Apostles?] dinner'. Henry Jackson made a 'very nice speech', as did 'Judge Lushington, who was the oldest of those present'.

They lunched at North Street last week and thought Charles and Molly looked 'very happy, and their house very nice'. They went to Harrow last Saturday to see the [F. E.?] Marshalls and had a 'very pleasant time there'; they went to the 'Speech room' in the evening 'to hear the final reading for the reading prize' which was 'very amusing', though they 'did not think the standard very high'. 'Young [James?] Butler, who must be about 15 or 16, was promising' though did not yet have 'sufficient command of his voice'; he is said to be 'quite a good scholar, and looks a nice boy'. The winner read Joy for his chosen piece. The Lower School had to read the 'description of William at the Boyne [from Macaulay]; but they did not make much of it'. Also saw Sir Arthur Hort, who is 'mainly responsible for [the] first fifteen boys'; believes he is 'doing very well', and there have certainly been more scholarships awarded to Harrow boys over the last few years. Very sad they have 'thought it necessary to dry up the Grove pond'; supposes it was a 'great nuisance and expense'.

They hope to see Sir George before long, and also that Caroline will come to Dorking around the end of the month.

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