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Trevelyan, Caroline (c 1847-1928) wife of Sir George Otto Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet
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Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Encloses 'the only letter which is come' that morning [not included], and describes the printed circulars which arrived: a notice of a half-yearly general meeting of the Pro[ ]s of the Scottish Australian Investment Company, and a notice of Henry having been made a member of the London Library. Also encloses a letter from Miss Clough [not included].

Claims that they 'scarcely feel afraid now of the war which appeared to some imminent' the previous day, and states that '[a]s Prince Leopold's Papa won't let him accept the Spanish Throne surely France can find no other pretext for such wanton bloodshed.' Refers to the weather in Rugby.

Reports that she has as yet had no letter from William, and states that she doesn't think that Arthur is strong, and that Dr [George?] Burrows advises against his playing certain games, such a croquet. Remarks that he must be careful if he goes to Switzerland. Reports that Mrs Trevelyan is unable to come to Rugby due to the heat, and 'is obliged to go to the sea with Lady Trevelyan.' Adds that Mr Trevelyan is to arrive in Rugby the following Friday. States that in a fortnight's time they will 'be free'.

Believes that Arthur will leave England about 2 August, and announces that she is to go with Mrs [Anne?] and Miss [Isabella?] Thompson about 10 August, as Mr [Reginald?] Thompson 'must attend some Law Court in August'. Asks Henry to tell her as soon as he knows where he is going. Adds that she sent his two Dividends in a registered letter to Berlin.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Margaret Price to R. C. Trevelyan

'Aunt Meggie' thanks Bobbie for his 'very amusing and nicely written letter'; would like to have seen the pantomime, and the 'dirty boy being made clean'. Once had a doll's plate with a picture of a machine turning old men into children: thinks the machine and the one Bobbie saw 'must have been nearly related'. Discusses the illustration on the notepaper of the boys playing football, who 'are giving each other tremendous whacks [underlined]'. Hopes his mother is well, and sends her love.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Looking forward to re-assembling on 21 April, and hopes that they will see 'little Calverley' [at school]; they will do their 'best to understand him and help him and make him happy'. Is likely to be 'passing through town' during the holidays; will let her know the exact dates when they are confirmed, and will be 'most glad' to call at home 'or wherever it is most convenient for Mr Trevelyan'.

Is happy that, since Mr Trevelyan wrote to him, they have 'succeeded admirably' with one boy at Harrow the 'son of Mr Tomlin of 40 Sussex Gardens, Hyde Park", who 'took Lower Remove' when he went to Harrow last September, and by the end of the term was first; according to Dr Butler he beat 'two very able entrance scholars' to do so. Knows that Mr Trevelyan was keen to know that Wixenford really do their 'utmost to get a boy on to the best place that his powers might admit of, without over-pressuring him. Arnold's friend, and predecessor as head, Mr Powles, examined all the boys last term and 'gave a very good report of them'; trusts that the teaching at Wixenford will continue to improve. William Egerton, Mordaunt Lawson and Hugh Walford (6 Cromwell Gardens, Queen's Gate), all go to Harrow at the end of this term, but he regrets none of them can expect to be placed highly, as they are 'not even if our little first class here'. They hope one boy will 'take a high place at Eton after Easter', and that 'Mr Arthur Guest's son will pass well into the Britannia next term'.

Apologises for writing so much about his 'little people', but expects that the Trevelyans know some of them and will also be interested for the sake of their 'own little boy'. Encloses a paper with a list of the clothes and other things which boys usually bring, and one about Exeats [included, see 110/3].

Mrs Arnold sends her regards, and hopes that when summer comes Mrs Trevelyan will be able to visit Robert at school. Arnold adds a postscript thanking Mrs Trevelyan for her 'kind concern at our scarlatina trouble'; they have certainly had an 'anxious time', but all the invalids have returned and are doing well.

The enclosed printed letter headed 'EXEATS' is dated July 1881; it states that on the request of parents children may be permitted to leave school once per term, from 11.30 am on Saturday till 1.30 pm the following Monday, or from 11.20 on Wednesday till 1.30 the following day. Mr Arnold is keen that exits be kept to a minimum, as 'they have often a very unsettling effect on the boy', and may also introduce 'infectious illness' into the school.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Luckily his time in London this holidays coincides with the Trevelyans' return: he will be able to come to the Admiralty on the 18th [April] and try to be there for 11 am. Miss Bartlett (the matron) will be glad to have instructions about health, and asks what infectious diseases Bobbie has had. Thinks he mentioned that the school will 'meet after Easter on April 21st'; a master will always travel on the 2.05 train from Wixenford to escort boys whose parents wish it, but expects she will be able to bring Bobbie herself this first time. His wife joins him in 'kind regards'.

Letter from Clara Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Is very glad that Mrs Trevelyan 'approves of the chemical food for Bobbie'. As his cough is 'very nearly well now' she hopes he will soon 'get strong', though he did give them 'rather a fright by fainting away quite at prayers' [cf 45/38]; he 'very soon recovered' and has seemed quite all right this afternoon and evening, so she therefore hopes it was mainly due to the 'close thundery feeling weather' which has also troubled several of the other boys today. He was quiet all morning, but 'seemed quite well' by the time they returned from church; this afternoon he went on a flower collecting walk with Mr and Mrs Arnold and some other boys and 'seemed as bright and well as any of them'. Trusts there is nothing to worry about, but thought Mrs Trevelyan would like to know that he had fainted; they will 'watch him carefully', and she will write again soon.

Had a letter from Mary Bright recently; her 'account of poor Hughie was a very sad one'; can 'hardly think how he can bear the long journey back to England'. But she says Mrs Arnold's brother, who is attending Hughie, says he recommends that they should; thinks they plan to leave Cannes on the 3rd [June]' and will 'be very anxious to hear of their safe arrival'. Mr Arnold sends his best regards.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Not worth while sending the 'usual formal Report of Bobbie's work', but thinks his mother will be glad to hear about his health and progress; the school will break up on 1 August. Bobbie now 'looks in perfect health', as Mr Sellar [Alexander Craig Sellar, father of Bobbie's schoolfellow Gerard?] will testify. He did two hours a day less work than usual when he first returned, is now only missing one hour, and Arnold hopes that by next week he will be doing the same as the other boys. Cannot yet give a 'decided opinion' on Bobbie's work: he is obviously 'a remarkably sensible boy' and will be 'easy to interest in anything worth learning'; he seemed 'slow and unmethodical' at first but has been much quicker in the last couple of days and when 'completely settled' should do even better. Seems to have covered 'a good deal of ground superficially' rather than having 'accurate knowledge' of any of his work, but 'one is liable to forget the fewness of his years in contemplating the multitude of his inches' so Arnold does not yet think he has fathomed his 'mental powers yet'. He is currently behind the third class, and in Latin will have to work temporarily in the one below; will bear in mind Mr Trevelyan's wish and not keep him back 'a day longer than necessary'. He is 'remarkably docile', 'cheerful and bright' over both work and play. Discusses his work and class placement in History, Geography and Arithmetic. He enjoys cricket and 'plays heartily', but seems particularly keen on his butterflies; thinks he is happy and will soon have many friends at school.

Heard from Mr Sellar that Mr Trevelyan was looking 'tired'; sends sympathy for his 'gigantic task' [as Secretary of State for Ireland]. Notes in a postscript that Bobbie does French with him; as with other subjects, he thinks he will soon do well, but currently has 'very little accurate knowledge'. Bobbie got his letters from his parents today and sends 'special thanks' to his father for writing'.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to George Otto Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Will follow Mr Trevelyan's suggestions: the only time Bobbie would out of sight of a master would be while butterflying, for which boys are allowed to 'roam about at will', though only inside the grounds. Will make sure, 'without exciting any notice if possible' that Bobbie is never 'without someone strong enough to protect him'. Had had the same thoughts himself [that Bobbie may need to protection due to his father being Secretary of State for Ireland], since 'no scheme of wickedness seems too far-fetched or diabolical for these men'. Bobbie seems well, and is getting on in his work; hopes he will soon be 'altogether fit for the upper division'. Sorry to hear that Mrs Trevelyan was worried about not hearing from Bobbie as usual; has told him that his mother was disappointed and does not think he will forget again.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Asked Mrs Arnold to write yesterday with details of Bobbie's train home, as he was too busy to do so properly. Thinks they should be pleased with Bobbie's progress considering the 'long interruption to his work at the beginning of term'. Since his parents like him to do some work in the holiday, give some suggestions. Has done better in several examinations than in his class work, showing that he had 'understood and remembered the work better than anyone'; he tends to lose marks in class due to 'his slow manner and mumbling though not unintelligent way of reading'; gives an example of him understanding a grammar exercise better than older boys.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

Thanks his parents for their letters. The [cricket] match began yesterday and will go on until Tuesday. Thinks the picnic will be on Friday. Will send his mother four roses he has got in his garden. Mrs Bartlett [the matron] says the medicine has 'put some colour' into his face and he should go on taking it. Has caught three caterpillars; 'Levson' [Granville Leveson-Gower ?] says he thinks they are peacocks, so Robert has given them away since they are common and small. His other caterpillars seems to be doing well; people think it will turn into a moth. Mr Arnold says the back board has made Robert's back straighter already, that he is fourth out of five in arithmetic and was bottom in French last week but is now second. Is working alone in Latin to 'get up' his grammar. Goes to bed late now, and gets up late.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Has just returned from abroad; thanks Mrs Trevelyan for her recent letter and that of 6 August saying that Mr Trevelyan had paid a cheque into Arnold's account. Glad to hear how Bobbie has got on; will 'thankfully receive suggestions' if Mr Trevelyan finds time to test Bobbie, and expects that if his term is not interrupted by illness he will make 'marked progress'. Did not expect Bobbie to complete all the work he suggested for him over the holiday. Will expect him on 20 September, and let Mrs Trevelyan know if she hears of anyone else coming from London that day. Hopes that her summer has been 'comparatively free from anxiety'; saw notices about the 'tour in Ireland' in the newspapers, and hopes she enjoyed this; she must be glad to see 'difficulties gradually disappearing' there and the results of her husband's work [as Secretary of State]. He and Mrs Arnold send their regards.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Thanks her for her instructions about Bobbie's journey [home]. He 'looks much better now than he did and his work shows a corresponding improvement'. Bobbie is 'very industrious' and willing to learn 'grammar and the like'; he 'fails most in applying his knowledge' in translating, but Arnold expects this will improve in time. In general they have 'every reason to be well satisfied with him, and he deserves a most happy holiday'.

It has also snowed at Wixenford, though much more lightly than in the North. He and Mrs Arnold both send regards. Adds a postscript saying that 'Little Tom Booth is flourishing', and they hope to see his father and sister in 'our little crowd on the 12th'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Letter decorated with stickers: a butterfly, kitten, and [?] milkmaid; a jester and bird [on the second page]. Is 'very well and happy'; hopes his family are too. Mr Arnold told him to ask her whether he is going to London, when, and by what train; is he to go with the 'London boys at 9.[0]5? The examinations have begun. The boys have not been to church today, as it was wet. There are 'eleven or twelve more days [until the end of term].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Is 'very happy', and hopes his family are all happy too. 'They' [the school authorities' say he is 'not very well', and he is going to 'have breakfast for a week'. Thinks that if she asks, Mr Arnold will let him have 'an exiat [sic]', as Arnold says he has been 'working well'. They have started football, and he 'likes it very much'. Sends love to all. There is going to be a magic lantern show at the school.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Decorated with transfer stickers of a fly, beetle and moths [?]. Is well and happy, hopes his family are too. Is 'going to try for the chess compitition [sic]', and Smith says he has 'a chance'. Asks what sort of bird Georgie caught. [James?] Tomlin gave him a moth. Thinks there are 'only more 60 days in the term'. Has 'bought the buterflie [sic] book from Browning' which he was meaning to buy anyway, for thirteen shillings: Newman's British Butterflies and Moths. Is going to write to Georgie soon. Sends love to all.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

On headed illustrated notepaper for Lansdown Crescent, Blackpool:- They have had 'very reindey [rainy?] weather', with six large trees being blown down. There is a 'nice little kitten' there, which he and Sophie [Wicksteed?] have named Vic. They are 'very happy', and have 'such nice things to play with'. He and Georgie send their love.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Had to 'go in to the liberary [sic]' on Saturday since it rained. They go butterfly-hunting between four and six on half-holidays. There are '7 hours work [at school]' and he does five; he goes to bed at seven and gets up at half seven in the morning. Everyone says his 'poison bottle [for butterflies] is very strong'; one boy said it 'almost knocked him down'; Archie borrowed it to 'poison a white'. Asks his mother to tell Miss Martin that the 'beautiful brimstone' broke in two when he was putting it in a 'relaxing pot'. Asks if he can have a 'breathing case for caterpillars'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Letter decorated with transfer stickers of figures engaged in various activities and a butterfly. Is 'very well and happy', and hopes his family also are. Shepherd is 'captain' of his bedroom, which he also shares with Archie, Dougel [sic] and Weston. Sends love to everyone. 'The little game are going to play the big game, not the elevens'. Is going to 'get up later for the next week'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Decorated with transfer sticker of a sailing ship. Hopes his family are well and happy, as he is. There is a 'rage for Stilographic and Antistilographic [sic] pens'. Hugo has not been expelled. Will be 'very glad' to have a few photographs. Is 'top for the week in Latin'. The exams are this week. Asks his mother to send some stamps, envelopes and note paper. Mrs Arnold gives lectures on botany. Has begun to collect stamps; Smith has given him 21, Browning 7, and Smith is going to give him some more; knows she does not mind. Glad to hear Grandpapa [Trevelyan?] Is better. Robert and Charlie have been writing postcards to each other ‘in the secret way’. Adds a postscript hoping that Sophy is all right.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Expects she got his postcard on Saturday; thanks her for her letter. Shares his bedroom with Law, Lewin, and Booth, though they thought they would have O'Brien. The new boys are Lyall, Barneby and Whitelaw minor. He is now in the Lower First, which consists of Smith, Leveson, Archie, Lawrence and himself; Tomlin and Hales [? are in the Upper First. Lewin comes today. Asks his mother if he can send his stamp book, which he left on a shelf in the night nursery in London. Hopes his father will make a 'successful speech'. A boy here is collecting 'old crests [?]' so asks if she can find any. Hopes Charlie 'has got a good place'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Is not going to school until Thursday. Booa [Mary Prestwich] thought of taking them to the Zoo today, but the wind is too cold so they are not going. Went to the Baker Street Bazaar; Robert bought his mother a paper basket; Booa bought '6 unbreakable tumblers' and a mat for Sir George's room. Is doing lessons every day with Miss Martin. Mrs Stephenson invited him and Georgie to tea, and to play in the Horticultural Gardens afterwards, but they are not going.

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