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Berenson, Bernard (1865-1959) art historian
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Notebook

Endpapers used for lists of poems [perhaps for Trevelyan's "Collected Works?]; another list inside. Notebook filled in from both ends, with contents including: essay on translation of Lucretius; dialogue between Septimius and Cinna ["Maya"], "Beelzebub"; dialogue between Thersites, Cressida and Poet; dialogue between Cressida, Lady Pandar, and Troilus; prose narrative about Abdul and Hasan; dialogue between Coryat [a name used for a Trevelyan-like figure in Lowes Dickinson's "Modern Symposium"] and Miranda on the subject of Love; text for lecture on Chinese poetry, containing praise of the translations by Arthur Waley; a prose narrative about a young man thinking through his ambitions in life, another version of this with Coryat as the young man; list of decisions about the future, for example, 'C. decides to be a prophet. A. " " " a poet..."; list of characters/names in two columns, 'Gigadibs, Puce, Prof Bruce? [circled], Apollinax? / Percy Smith?, Cynicus? [struck through], Panurge? [circled], Thersites? [struck through]' - these could be intended as pseudonyms as a third column contains names of friends, 'C.A [Clifford Allen], Goldie [Lowes Dickinson], (Klingsor), [Bernard] Berenson'; dialogue between 'P.' and 'D.' regarding a conversation D. and 'R.H.' have recently had with Coryat [see 29/2]. Loose sheet with verse dialogue between 'Father' and 'Child'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

6 Racknitz Strasse, Dresden. - Bob's letter reached here before he and Helen did, as Berlin kept them much longer than they expected; all the galleries closed at 3 pm so the officials could have their 'mittags essen' [sic]; not dining properly in the evening is the 'only really uncivilized thing they do'. Liked [Georg?] Gronau, whom B.B. [Bernard Berenson] introduced to him, and who took him to see a fine private collection of drawings and sculptures. Dresden is much nicer than Berlin, 'full of fantastic Barocheries and Rocochoneries'; the Gallery is huge but there are 'very few primitives & lots of Rubens & Corregio & 17th century people' whom Fry likes to 'look at lazily'. Helen 'won't come round' to Correggio and doesn't like [Raphael's] "Sistine Madonna"; to Fry's great surprise he finds it 'simply glorious', and 'Raphael painting almost like Titian'; wonders what he would have done had he lived. He and Helen 'never shall agree on Raphael Correggio & Rubens'; is 'almost annoyed' that he always likes the great artists. [Nathaniel] Wedd's "Quarterly" is very interesting; agrees with Bob that it is a shame 'to make it directly polemical', but he does not 'quite know these logrolled Oxford men'; in art he thinks 'most reputations are logrolled so one gets to think it the normal way'. Helen is asleep; they have both been unwell recently due to German food, but are getting well since they 'are in a young ladies Pension & are fed on pap'. Amusing about Miss V. d. H [Elizabeth Van der Hoeven] guessing; thinks she is good at that; is also 'frightened of her a little because she always seems to be observing more than she shows'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Rome. - Will arrive in England around the 25th and stay, he hopes, at the Italian Embassy. Plans to attend meetings of the W.F.U.N.A. between 15-20 December, and very much hopes he can visit the Shiffolds. Must get in touch with Trevelyan's brother George about his translation of "English Social History". Is very happy to coming to England after so many years, which came about through an invitation from Elena Carandini and the coincidence of the W.F.U.N.A. meetings. Is going to I Tatti 'to get B.B. [Berenson]'s blessings' before his journey.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Apologises if his letter writing has fallen off; has been more absorbed in his work recently. Has received her New Year's letter; a delight to know she loves him so much; discusses separation and distance. The Straughn Davidsons came today, 'two brothers and the wife of one' [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson and either of George or William, his brothers?]; they are nice people, though they do break up his 'pleasant solitude'. Has not got on well with his writing recently; thinks he is stale and should take the day off tomorrow to read novels. Is going to bed now to read Stephenson's letters, which Davidson has lent him.

Returns to the letter next morning with a description of last night's dreams, one about eating a breakfast of 'the staple diet of trout in a pond', and another about kissing an unknown young lady. Some of Stevenson's letters are well worth reading; thinks he was 'a pleasant fellow with a real streak of genius', though does not join in the 'prevalent R.L.S. worship'. Asks if she knows "Treasure Island", "[The Master of] Ballantrae" and his short stories. If the forecast is correct and they are due 'some dirty weather', the Strachan-Davidsons will be an 'acquisition'. Has skipped on to the second act of his play, and is 'plugging away at the faithful wife'; the difficulty is the villain, who is 'a plausible gentlemanly kind'. Encloses a dried beetle which he found 'in that state' on his cliff; sends it in response to her almond, and has placed 'not a few kisses on his back'. Very sorry her aunt is so unwell. Glad Willy v[an] R[iemsdijk] is not going [to the Second Boer War]; does not know what is going to happen. Sorry that she is to have so little time with [Bram] Eldering; hopes she will be able to go on her return from England. Returns to the letter after 'midday tea'; has not yet heard from [Bernard] Berenson but thinks he will pay him a visit of a couple of days if he wishes. Has finished [Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant", which he now does not think is a real success; looks forward to being able to discuss such things with her in their own house. Quotes a music hall song of Eugene Stratton about love. Is not a natural letter-writer; she is much better than he is.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Has not heard from Fry for a while: hopes Helen and Julian are well. Description of 'a Julian at the hotel': Julian Cotton of the Indian Civil Service, honeymooning with his Neapolitan wife [neé Gigia Riccardi Arlotta]. Other guests are Kershaw and his friend Perry, an ex-actor; 'the Lapchinski', who luckily only came for a week; and [William] Wyse of Trinity, an Apostle who has been forced by ill health to give up work for a year. Goes every day to the Cimbrone, passing Fry's old studio, and has overheard prayers there as if to 'rid the room of... some devil who has...haunted there since you painted him in your picture of St Antony'. Taking tea today with Mrs Read [sic: Mrs Reid, widow of Francis Nevile Reid of Villa Rufolo]. Bessie is learning Latin and Trevelyan is rewriting the old play 'which sent [Fry] and Helen to sleep once'. Has heard nothing from Johnson about "Polyphemus" and only seen two reviews. Bridges wrote him an appreciative letter, though he did not like the Faun's song or make much of the irregular metres. Will probably stay at Berenson's on the way north; asks if he and Fry might meet around Florence. Fry should read Defoe's "Moll Flanders", which is the best novel in English. Bessie is now reading "Robinson Crusoe" to him as a 'shaving book', which is also excellent.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, prov. di Salerno. - Explains how the rumour of Fry's death [see also 4/46 and 4/47] spread: it originated from [William] Sharp who told the Grandmonts at Taormina that he had seen an obituary; they then wrote to Helen [Fry], and to Bessie who wired to the Enticknaps who replied this morning that the Frys were both well, and only then told Trevelyan. Hopes the obituary was not that of Fry's brother, cousin [Lewis George Fry] the painter or any other near relation. Has finished the first act of his new play, on a mediaeval theme. His "Cecilia Gonzaga" is coming out in a month or two. Johnson has been bothering him over the £10 Trevelyan would not pay [for printing “Polyphemus and Other Poems”], claiming it is Fry's fee, which Trevelyan does not think has been paid. Does not want to quarrel with Johnson as he has the remainder of the edition but thinks he is trying to swindle them. Asks whether the Frys have changed houses; also whether he has done anything on their Claude, whether the Bellinis [works by Jacopo Bellini discovered by Fry in Venice which he hoped would be bought by the National Gallery] will come, and about 'the Cosimo and your petition to the Balfours'. News from Ravello about ‘the Kershaw’, Madam Palumbo, Tufti, Francesca and Mrs Reid. Fry’s portrait of ‘Old Pal. [Pasquale Palumbo]’ is much treasured by Madam Palumbo. They are reading [Richardson's] "Clarissa". Going to Palermo in about a month, and hope to see Lina. Berenson is in good humour with Fry; Trevelyan has been correcting some of his proofs.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Flora Russell

Thanks Flora for the kind offer of a 'goat cream cheese'; he will 'delight in it', and it will bring back memories of Greece and Italy; is not sure about Bessie, who feels 'a little unworthy of it', but will give it a try. Hopes to go to Italy at the end of March to see [Bernard] Berenson, and a friend at Corton [Umberto Morra]; also hopes to see Lina [Waterfield], who is 'bad about writing' but is no doubt busy with 'her fondo and other things'. Cannot discover where Pan was born; Tmolus is 'as likely as anywhere' and is often associated with him, as in Shelley's "Hymn to Pan". Glad his translations pleased her; has not been able to write any of his own poetry for a 'long time now'. Hopes to visit her before going to Italy.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Rocca Bella, Taormina. - has heard the news of the Frys' move to Hampstead from Mrs Enticknap; it is very sad, but hopes they will soon forget Dorking. Will be back in England by Easter to be at [G.E.] Moore's Easter party, which he thinks is to be in the New Forest. Asks Fry if he could come, and persuade Goldie [Dickinson] to come also; has written to [Bertrand] Russell to suggest his coming. Will go to the Berensons next week. Saw a great deal of the Waterfields at Palermo and has got to like [Aubrey] Waterfield very much; wishes Fry could appreciate him more, as Berenson now seems to. Must see Fry as soon as possible as he must settle with Johnson [publisher of Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"].

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - First page begins with a list of passages or words from G.M. Trevelyan's "English Social History" which are unclear to Morra; the letter follows with an opening apology for sending them. Had a good journey back from England, arriving on Christmas Eve and finding B.B. [Berenson] and the household well; is going to Cortona tomorrow then on to Rome, where Trevelyan should send his reply. Was delighted to spend two days with the Trevelyans. They are expecting a visit at I Tatti, but Trevelyan must let them know when he plans to come, as they may be moving in the spring. Has been reading the "Journal" of Charles Du Bos for 1921-1923, which is fascinating, sometimes deep and sometimes exasperating; Trevelyan appears more than once.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Has been 'out composing verses in a tempest'. Glad she is having happy dreams; suggests analyses for her one about the cicalas [9/26]. Quotes from Moore on sleep [Thomas Sturge Moore, "To An Early Spring Day"]. Sorry that her aunt's recovery is not speedier. Will send a letter to her tomorrow. Does not like Mrs Costelloe 'in many ways', but does not condemn her for 'refusing to live with Costelloe' who seems to have been 'almost impossible to live with', though she should not have been 'taken in' by him; thinks her and [Bernard] Berenson's relationship is 'as nice as those sort of relations can be'; discusses her influence on him. Supposes he will see Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon] at Florence; explains the nature of their friendship further. He and Lina are on 'very good terms' again, and she likes his poem about her pet bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though it is not yet finished.

Continues the letter next day; has read most of the editor's letter in the paper sent by Bessie's uncle [in a Dutch paper, to the Duke of Devonshire, see 9/26]; thinks he is 'in the main right' but knows 'little of the facts, except what he has gathered from English writers who disapprove of the [Second Boer] war' such as Bryce, Hobson, Lecky and Courtney; since he has 'ornamented his columns with many not very apt quotations' Bob as a poet ought not to be too hard on him. Thinks he will spend two days with Berenson at Florence, since it is unlikely Mrs Costelloe will be back; has not yet heard from his mother about crossing with Bessie and the letter may not have reached her. Asks him his plans suit Bessie. Is torn between Venus and Apollo, and 'Apollo has all the nine young ladies [the Muses] on his side'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Gives [Bernard] Berenson's address at Florence. Has been 'a bit stuck' with his play; but may write a little more before he leaves; may have to read more books on 'mediaeval manners, especially at meals, on minstrels and hunting'. Hopes that her aunt is better. Draws a sketch of his 'little Bessie tree'. Is reading a book on the evil eye, seems 'we live in a damned superstition planet'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Sets out his revised plans due to Bessie's aunt's continued illness again; 'very sad for her to be ill during the last few months [Bessie] will be with her', though the marriage could be put off if necessary. Even if the physical side of his feelings for her were not there, believes he would want to have her as a constant companion, which he cannot say even for 'his dearest friends such as Sanger and Fry and [Thomas Sturge] Moore'. Perhaps he should not separate these two aspects of his feelings; consideration of the way her personality seems to be 'always changing' slightly. Cuts off these 'lover's speculations', saying he should return to Mr Mudge [?]. Thinks that Mrs [Mary] Costelloe will not be back when he stays with [Bernard] Berenson, though he could not change his plans now, and does not want to have a breach with her. Has not done well with his play recently, but 'modified the plot somewhat' yesterday and thinks he will get on better now; will be able to read up on medieval manners and costumes on his return to England. Expects he will have to go to Welcombe even if Bessie does not come, and there is 'a fine French book on Medieval customs in the library'. Glad she was pleased by the beetle he sent her; likes 'little everything' as an endearment; knows the feeling that a dream is still real after waking. Hopes they have a nurse for her aunt now. Copies out his translation of the Swallow Song of Rhodes; it is not quite right yet and he needs a dictionary to check some of the words.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

61 Ripon St., Calcutta. - Thanks Trevelyan for his letter: thinks the changes have improved the lines [of a poem?]. Berenson is right about the pronunciation of Yudhishthira. Is very grateful to Trevelyan for having spoken to C.A. [Clifford Allen]. Is finding life hard in India, faced with the 'Victorian dogmatism' which most of the intellectuals affect, with a 'kind of religious mysticism for the sake of the reputation of the country'; human beings are not valued as human beings. Finds the country itself very beautiful though: has been to Ajunta, Ellora, Delhi, Agra, Jaipur and Lucknow; likes Hyderabad best. Is currently with the Singhs at Bahagalpur, since his father is away from Calcutta. Sees the League [of Nations] as his 'only salvation'; supposes that Allen is right and after the Reparations Conference there will be less economic tension and more posts available. Was nearly appointed to a post in the Information Department of the Secretariat in 1929, supported by Lord Lytton and Harold Williams of the "Times", a close friend because of 'shared Moscow experiences'; Williams' untimely death meant that the High Commissioner's brother got the post. Since then every post has gone to Indians in Geneva, even if they are less well qualified. Feels he will have to stay in India and get some temporary post, to lift cares from his friends in Paris [the Germanova / Kalitinsky household]; hears Julian is going to paint a fresco in their rooms, 'with Osny as the background and Rex [the dog] as the chief motif'; is so glad he visits them.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Gives [Bernard] Berenson's address at Florence; he is being 'very pressing and says he will be alone', so Bob will start on 24 or 25 January and can stay till he goes on to the Hague, probably at the end of the month but this will depend on Bessie's news. Hopes her aunt is better. May be able to do some work at Florence. Sends a 'late-blossoming plum' with his kisses.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Expects this is the last letter he will write her from Ravello; will start on the 24th, spend some of that day at Pompeii and take the evening express to Florence, arriving next day. Bessie's last account of her 'patient' [her aunt] was better; hopes she may be recovering by the time he reaches the Hague. Has been unlucky with the weather for the last two years but should not complain, as if the weather had not been bad last January he may not have accompanied his brother [George?] to Sicily and met Bessie. In the same way, if the Grandmonts had had a cook at the start of 1896, they would not have dined at the Timeo so he would never have met them and heard of her; he ought to 'like all cooks for that henceforth'. Bessie's quotation from Dante was 'very charming'; asks if she copied it out at Ede before 2 September or after. Encloses a 'little relic' he found in his waistcoat pocket, which he has kissed; she too should 'put the bits [of the railway ticket] together and kiss them' since they brought her and Bob together and made them kiss each other, though she did not kiss him till November, and he kissed her wrist 'a whole month and more before'. Did not sleep well last night as '"that horrible little dog" Gyp (as Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] would say' was barking; Madame [von Wartburg] has the dog safe in her room tonight.

Finishes the letter next day; the weather is lovely, and he almost regrets leaving, but will enjoy a few days in Florence and seeing [Bernard] Berenson; wants to see what he thinks of his last year's poems, and what he has done on this play. He usually likes Bob's work, but not always. Discussion of how no one person can be relied on to say whether something is good or bad. Hopes to see a few pictures at Florence, though does not mean to do much sightseeing. Sorry that Bessie had to miss Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture; thinks she is right that she should not come to England before her aunt is nearly well. Glad that her cousin [Louise Hubrecht] and the Röntgens liked his poems; Bessie is indeed a 'fine advertising agent'. Describes his breakfast here and in England.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Arrived safely yesterday, having had a 'delightful afternoon' at Pompeii on the way. Has found [Bernard] Berenson alone; Mrs C. [Mary Costelloe] will not return for a week or two; thinks that he and Berenson are 'making an effort not to squabble on matters of opinion, which is good discipline'. Hopes to hear from Bessie soon; will decide from what she says about her aunt's health how long to stay in Florence. Has not yet seen Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon]; thinks things between them are all right now as 'her letters were quite friendly' and she liked his poem about her pet bat ["The Lady's Bat"]. Is in more difficulty with Mrs Costelloe; must keep on good terms with her if he wants to stay friends with Berenson; mistrusts her gossip and the effect it might have had on Lina. Has not yet shown Berenson his last year's poems and the work on his new play; hopes he will be encouraging. Dined with the Rasponis last night, who are very nice and live opposite in 'a magnificent palace'. Thinks Tuscany 'the finest country in the world'. Had a good time at Ravello, especially towards the end; the Straughns [sic: Strachan-Davidsons?] were 'very good company', though some 'annoying strangers' turned up. Mrs Reid was 'very kind'; wants him and Bessie to come in August or September; he has said that is not for him to decide. Will let Bessie know when he is due to arrive, and make sure he does so in the day so she will not have to get up in the dark to meet him at the station; wonders who will see the other first, as they are both 'as blind as bats'. Will show her the poem about the bat when she comes; it is not 'first class' but 'pretty'. Hopes her aunt continues to get well; would be a great shame if Bessie could not come to England in time to go to Welcombe.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Has received two letters from her, one forwarded from 'Varello' [Ravello]. Thinks he will start back on Friday 2nd and reach the Hague on Saturday evening; if his train would get in too late, would arrive on Sunday morning instead. Thinks he may go to the Twee Staden hotel, as was not very comfortable at the Angleterre and it was not cheap. Having a good time in Florence, though he has not done any work. Maeterlinck's "La sagesse et la destinée" is 'surprisingly good', much better than "Le Trésor des humbles" . Dined at Mrs [Janet] Ross's last night; has only just recovered from the 'exceedingly good dinner'. Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon] 'very pleasant' and they are good friends again now; she was pleased with his bat ["The Lady's Bat"]. Had a 'little brush with Berenson about the war, as he is frantically cynical on such matters' but otherwise they have got on well. Berenson likes some of his work, but thinks his 'Indian poem dull' and is probably right'; Bob has not yet read him the play. Has to go down to Florence in the rain to lunch with people he doesn't much care for, but Berenson will probably show him some pictures afterwards. The myrtle [see the enclosure with 9/107] is indeed the 'tree of Venus'. Is glad her aunt is better, and hopes her recovery will continue; hopes Grandmont will not be long in bed ill. Is sending him some wine from Ravello, but fears it will not be good enough for 'his fastidious palate'.

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Nr. Dorking. - Leaving on Saturday or Sunday for Siena, where they do not expect to spend more than a week, before going on to Pisa and Milan. His book ["Giovanni Bellini"] has been attacked by '[Charles] Loeser & Co who think they will be dealing a blow at B.B. [Bernard Berenson]'; it seems to be 'humorous'; though the point they make is 'ridiculous'. He and Helen went on an expedition with Mrs [Janet] Ross, whom they like very much. Bob must tell them when and where to expect him.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Does not think he can get to the Hague except around eleven at night because of the trains, so she is not bound to come and meet him. Can go straight to his hotel, probably the Angleterre as he cannot remember how to address the people at the Twee Steden, then come to see her early next day. Glad to hear good news of her aunt again. Knows a Miss Crommelin, 'half or whole Dutch', who lives with Isabel Fry; expects she is the same family [as Bessie's friend, see 9/31]; likes her 'well enough, though she is rather flagrantly "New womanly"'. Weather bad; is reading some interesting books; not inclined to work. Berenson has been telling him about old Italian and Russian books; has been reading Tolstoy's "Katia" ["Family Happiness"; hopes their marriage will turn out better; thinks it 'an interesting book, but rather unsatisfactory'.

Letter from [Wilhelm?] Fröhner to R. C. Trevelyan

Paris. - Very flattered that Trevelyan has sent him his "Translations from Lucretius"; his eyes are no longer capable of reading it, but Madame de Rohan-Chabot and Madame de Maillé will read him the most difficult passages; wishes him the success which 'old Major von Knebel, friend of Goethe, had with his translation. [ Aimé Sanson] de Pongerville, who translated Lucretius into French was named keeper at the Bibliothèque Royale and member of the Académie Française; his daughter married [Auguste] Silvy, who 'played a sad role after the catastrophe of 1870' [the siege of Paris during the Franco-Prussian War] as a minister when Tours was temporary seat of government. Trevelyan's address recalls the memory of [George Tomkyns Chesney's] "Battle of Dorking", which gave rise to so much talk in the last years of Napoleon III. Has seen their friend [Bernard] Berenson several times since Trevelyan's departure, who is one of the 'great trumpets of Trevelyan's glory'. The countess of Rohan-Chabot also came before her trip to Evian.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Asks if someone could book him a room at the Twee Steden, or the Angleterre if that is not possible; she need not come to meet him at the station since he will arrive so late. Berenson has given him a list of Russian books in translation to read. His mother says they should decide themselves whether he should accompany to England, and do as her uncle and aunt think right. Does hope she will be able to come on the 14th and spend some time at Welcombe. The Frys have got them a ring. Hopes her aunt is still better, as he could not bear not to see Bessie, will shave away the bristles from the journey so that they can pay each other some of their 'debt of K[isses]'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear Elizabeth is comfortably settled at Florence; hopes she and Bob are enjoying their time with the Berensons; supposes they will reach Ravello around Christmas. Charles and Mary are back from 'ten days in their constituency with meetings every night'. There was a Women's Liberal Association meeting at Cambo on Wednesday; Charles chaired and Miss [Florence?] Balgarnie spoke, and it was an excellent meeting. Charles is now 'first rate' at public speaking, and Mary also can speak 'quite nicely'. Had a letter from Miss Somerville about the Westminster bazaar, which made forty pounds; she said the 'very nice things' which Elizabeth had sent sold quickly. Good to hear that Elizabeth and Robert's [new] house has got on so well; probably good for her to have a quiet time before she has to start thinking about moving, though it is possible to have so much. Caroline herself sometimes feels that at Wallington if she sees no one but Sir George for a week, though he - and Robert - are the 'best of company'. Hopes Elizabeth will come to Welcombe for Easter, when Robert is with his friends [on George Moore's reading holiday]. George is coming to them next week, and they go to Welcombe on 27 December. There is a 'great fuss' at the Grosvenor Cr[escen]t Club: the proprietress seems 'unsatisfactory', while the food and management have been 'very bad'; Caroline had decided to leave before she hear about the row. Julia seems to be the 'centre of it'; Caroline will send Elizabeth her letter. Julia is not 'very delightful or interesting, but she is perfectly respectable & not at all fast!'. Caroline paid Elizabeth's subscription on 17 January, so she had better write a resignation letter before then if she does not want to carry on; it is a great pity, as it 'was really a nice club at one time'. There will be a 'school treat' on Thursday, so she is hoping the mild weather will last. Is reading 'such a pleasant life of Burne Jones by his wife' ["Memorials of Edward Burne-Jones"]. Calls the Pre-Raphaelites 'an innocent high minded set, with all their absurdities'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Metelliano. - Is happy to say that he is coming to England for the Executive Committee of the International PEN, taking place between 25-27 April. Is also planning to visit Roger Hinks in Holland. Must see Trevelyan, either in London or at the Shiffolds; is glad he is recovering, did not know he had been low. Saw a notice in the "Times" about [Reginald Popham] Nicholson's death, which must have affected B.B. [Berenson]. Will visit I Tatti just before coming to England. Has seen Raymond Mortimer, but missed [Stephen] Spender and Humphrey Sumner who were in Rome while he was in Paris with the W.F.U.N.A. Is very sorry about Trevelyan's sister in law [Janet: her illness]; would like to write to Trevelyan's brother [George]. Is almost sure to go to Edinburgh for the PEN Congress at the end of August.

Letter from Janet Ross to R. C. Trevelyan

Poggio Gherardo, Via Settignanese, Firenze. - Discusses Trevelyan's corrections for her book ["Florentine Villas"] which will not be published till April as 'Miss [Nelly] Erichsen is behindhand with her drawings'. Will be 'very pleasant' to see Trevelyan and make his wife's acquaintance. Afraid he will find Mr Ross 'very much altered and aged'. [Bernard] Berenson is staying with them as the Frullino is let; today Mrs Costelloe [Mary, later Berenson's wife], her mother, brother and two children went to the new villa [I Tatti], which is 'delightful'. Berenson will stay with the Rosses until the marriage on about 16 December. Lina is then probably going to Rome, or to visit the Curries; she was going to go to Egypt, but now does not want to leave her uncle in his illness for so long. Sends love to 'my Poet ([George]Meredith)' when Trevelyan next sees him; he is 'delightful company, when there is not a large audience', though 'apt to pose' when he has one. Feels guilty for taking up so much of Trevelyan's time [with corrections]; is very grateful and wishes she could do something in return.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Saw Simon Nicholson [ie Reginald Popham Nicholson] yesterday; cannot remember whether Julian knows him; he and his wife live near [E.M.] Forster and are 'great friends of his and B.B. [Bernard Berenson] and now of Bob and Bessie. Has given Bob the address of a friend whom Julian might like to meet, a 'camouflage during the last war' and also a painter, 'about 60 years old, and very intelligent etc'; however, he is based 'up beyond Fort William, nearer the [Loch Ness] Monster than to [Julian]'. Bessie is home from the Park [home of Annie Philips], and seems well; they hope to see Ursula soon. Simon Nicholson was in the colonial service with Lugard in west Africa 'for years'; said he was shown some of Julian's 'Africa sketches by K[enneth?] Clark and liked them very much'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Metelliano. - Has been unable to write to Trevelyan, who has been to Wallington, sooner due to travel and congresses. Was a pleasure to spend time at the Shiffolds with him and Bessie, and to find him better than expected; also enjoyed his time in Edinburgh and Holland, though nothing about his three days in Belgium pleased him. Was summoned home due to a sudden deterioration in Ebe's sight; is afraid she is going blind. Going to stay with B.B. [Berenson] at Vallombrosa, where he will see Kenneth Clark, then will go to Rome. Has read Gathorne Hardy's book on Logan [Pearsall Smith]; thought it interesting and probably truthful, but that Gathorne Hardy did not come across very well, and that there was 'something peevish and not quite crystalline' in his attitude.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Apologises for not replying sooner, due to flu. Hopes that Trevelyan is recovering well after his operation, and that 'excellent friends', as well as his wife' are helping time pass pleasantly. Hopes to go to Rome after Easter. [John] Walker is coming, with Alda and Cecil. Hopes to come to England. Has sent word to Florence that Trevelyan's subscription to "Pègaso" should be paid. The Berensons left in uncertain weather and had a bad journey, but they seem to be much enjoying Tunis. Encourages Trevelyan to write an epistle to his doctor.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Is writing a brief birthday letter 'with chilblained fingers in the fireless library'. Wonders whether Julian and Gordon B[ottomley] have 'mutually remembered one another'. Glad he need not go up [to London?] on Friday to organise new photographs, as the roads are 'still very bad here'; Julian will need to be sure his car is in 'good working order' before fetching it from the Shiffolds. [Umberto] Morra would like both Bob and Julian to come; bus would be better than train; he is not certain of dates yet, but it will probably be after he has been to I Tatti [Bernard Berenson's house] for Easter. Nicky [Mariano] writes that they would like to put them both up at I Tatti; in the unlikely event of sudden visitors, she would find Julian a room in Florence.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

Paris. - Rang up [Nicky] Mariano today and is seeing [Bernard] Berenson tomorrow afternoon. Julian and Ursula are coming to lunch today; he will tell them to contact the Berenson party at their hotel. Cannot express his gratitude for what Trevelyan is doing for him and his friends: the money for the apartment came last Saturday; G. [Marie Germanova] will write soon, she is busy because of Suhrawardy's impending departure. Will send back [Lascelles] Abercrombie's book from India. The devaluation [of the franc] has been too late for him to benefit, though he has helped his friends Germanova and Kalitinsky with the purchase of a wireless. Does not think Woolf will accept the poems [at the Hogarth Press], but they have been helpful in bringing Trevelyan and Suhrawardy's 'minds and sensibility closer'. Replies in detail to Trevelyan's further comments on the poems.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Cortona. - Bearing in mind Trevelyan's readiness to help Italians in hardship because of their views, Morra had thought that he would be able to help a friend of some friends who is in real difficulty in Italy. However, this man has been very ill all spring and summer and therefore cannot travel, but is in an even more desperate state; the only work he is fit to do is literary or journalistic, the former will not pay and he is forbidden the latter. The 'B.B.s' seem happy at Constantinople, judging by a postcard from Nicky [Mariano]. Asks Trevelyan's opinion of Prince Mirsky's work, and for a recommendation of a good book on Russian literatue; also asks whether the [Kenneth] Clarks are still in London.

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