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Trevelyan, Elizabeth (1875-1957) musician, known as Bessie
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Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Thanks Bessie for her letters and postcard, and answers her questions: her book is "Wilfrid Scawen Blunt", and was published in 1939 when she was still Edith Finch; is sorry she does not have a copy to lend her. Agrees that the weather is very cold, though the Russells have not had to retire to bed to keep warm like Bessie; hopes she is not ill. They have not yet seen V[eronica] Wedgwood's book ["The King's Peace, 1637–1641", vol. 1 of "The Great Rebellion"]; liked her "William the Silent" very much, but they have been so busy to read much besides what must be read. They both have been very busy since Bertie's Christmas broadcast ["Man’s Peril from the Hydrogen Bomb.”]; she hopes his energy will hold out and that 'passionate sincerity' will bring about the proposal's success. Domestically, they are in chaos: the cook-general's husband is ill so she has been away since before Christmas, they have a little help from a char and from the grandchildren's governess. Their grandchildren [Felicity, Anne, and Lucy] are now in their sole care, 'since their parents first left them and then left each other'. John has been ill; he spends some of his time with his mother, and some with them; it has been 'really fierce and harrowing' for Bertie. They 'love the little girls dearly' however. Sorry the roads are so treacherous; would be lovely to see her when she can get to London again.

Letter from Pau Casals to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Prades. - Thanks her for her letter of condolence [on the death of Francesca Capdevila]: he has lost a most noble and faithful companion. The book of conversations [with Josep Corredor, see 2/10] is a great success in the German and French editions; the English translation, by André Mangeot, is ready and will be brought out soon by Hutchinson and Co. Thanks her for her interest, and hopes the book will deserve it.

Letter from Robert Gathorne-Hardy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Mill House, Stanford Dingley, nr Reading, Berks. - There are more letters of her husband's letters to Robert Bridges [on metrical questions, particularly in 'Testament of Youth'] than he thought; he lists them by date and mentions also fourteen letters from Bridges. Hopes he may have her permission to print them all, then he's sure the executor will also agree. Intends to add a note to each letter explaining to which poem they allude; would make the book unwieldy and difficult in terms of copyright to include quotations here. Is not planning to advertise the book publicly, but would send round notices to friends he knows are admirers of Bridges. Cannot take on a larger edition.

Copy letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan to Robert Gathorne-Hardy

Shiffolds. - Apologises for dictating her letter as she is unwell. The final decision about whether Gathorne-Hardy can use the correspondence between her husband and Robert Bridges rests with his literary executor, Humphry Trevelyan. Would like to know the details of the planned publication so that she can correspond with Humphrey: which letters; whether Gathorne-Hardy intends to insert any of the text of the poem [Testament of Beauty], as she found it difficult not having it to hand when Mrs Jones was reading the letter; whether he plans to advertise the publication widely or just amongst his friends.

Letter from Robert Gathorne-Hardy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Mill House, Stanford Dingley, nr Reading, Berks. - Would like to publish the letters by [Robert] Bridges to her husband about his "New Verse" and "Testament of Beauty" which he copied out when staying with her, as well as about three letters from her husband to Bridges. Sir Edmund Bridges is planning to publish a selection from his father's letters and he would not like to affect the sales for this, so a small edition of about 60 copies is planned 'as a sort of personal homage to two poets that I admire'. Robert Bridges himself was in the habit of printing very small edition of his works before wider publication. As her royalty he would send her six copies, of which one would be on 'special paper'. Will start at once if she agrees. Feels a larger edition would be a mistake. Ralph Abercrombie had the proof issue of "Testament of Beauty" containing her husband's suggested alterations; he has lent it to Sir Edward.

Letter from Edward Bridges to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Goodman's Furze, Headley, Epsom. - Writes about publication of the correspondence between his father and her husband: he plans eventually to bring out a selected volume of letters, but this is for the future; Gathorne-Hardy would like to bring out a small private edition of a few letters between R. C. Trevelyan and R. Bridges on metrical problems. He does not think this would interfere with his own later edition of the letters, and hopes she will allow Gathorne-Hardy's project to go ahead.

Letter from Joseph Scott to Elizabeth Trevelyan

University College London, Gower Street WC1. - Glad to hear the Master has now issued his report of the speeches at the opening of the Trevelyan Memorial Library; looks forward to reading them when next in Birkbeck. Still feels it is a pity to publish only a few copies of the correspondence between her husband and Robert Bridges, but can do nothing about it; does not know Sir Edward Bridges at all. Suggests a compromise which might interest Gathorne-Hardy: if he offered the text of the letters to a literary magazine such as "Essays in Criticism" or "The London Magazine" the letters would reach a wide readership, and Gathorne-Hardy would have 50 copies as offprints. His family are well. Hopes that she and Mrs Jones are well.

Letter from Pau Casals to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Prades. - Was very happy to see Engelbert [Röntgen] again after so many years: he is just the same as always. Hopes that Lugano will be a good place for Engelbert and his wife; the surroundings are very beautiful, and there is decent music there, which he could influence, perhaps he could direct an orchestra. Has been busy with the organisation of the 1955 [Prades] Festival; the programme is not totally fixed yet but he thinks half will be Bach, with the cantatas played by the Bach Group of New York, the violin sonatas by Menuhin, the cello suites by himself and the concertos for piano by Serkin, Horszowski and Istomin. Thinks of dedicating the other half of the festival to chamber music by Schubert and Brahms. All this promised joy, though, is obscured by the sad things in life, particularly the grave state of health of Madame Capdevila.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Has received and praises the speech given by Bessie at the opening of Robert's library [at Bickbeck College, London; also glad to see Forster's speech. It must have been a pleasing and happy occasion. He and Nicky are glad she has good friends in England, and he wishes he could travel and see her again. The 'Julian couple' were charming.

Letter from Robert Gathorne-Hardy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Mill House, Stanford Dingley, nr Reading, Berks. - Is sorry not to have written sooner: he is chair of his district council, which takes up 'all of [his] intellectual energy'. The district council also caused him to miss the opening of the library [the Trevelyan Memorial Library at Birkbeck College, London]; he was very sorry not to hear Morgan Forster's speech and would love to get hold of a copy. He is loth to bring out more than a small edition of the letters [between her husband and Robert Bridges] firstly as it would take time and he only has the weekends for the work, and secondly because Sir Edward Bridges is thinking of his own edition of his father's letters.

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Good news that Bessie may be able to stay with them on one of her trips to London; suggests the best days. She is 'acting as Bertie's secretary' now and so is also very busy and unable to come to Dorking either; they are both very sorry. They have not yet had the report of the speeches at Birkbeck College [for the donation of R. C. Trevelyan's books to the library].

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Happy to hear about the party at Birkbeck College [for the donation of R. C. Trevelyan's books to the library] and wished they could have been there. Would like to read Bessie's and E. M. Forster's speeches if they have been printed; thinks with 'admiring wonder' of Bessie having enjoyed making the speech. Would love to visit the Shiffolds, but does not think they can get away; they had an 'absolutely heavenly' holiday in France, but now Bertie is very busy. She worries about him; wishes sometimes that he would refuse to take on what should, it seems to her, be other people's responsibilities. John's book is a short story he wrote a few years ago ["Abandon Spa Hot Springs"], published by the Gaberbocchus Press. She thinks it is good, but 'a slight production for a young man with three children to be supported'; still, Bertie would not be happy if John were not working. They take long walks now and again, this afternoon along the river to Ham House; Bessie's garden and the countryside around must be 'enchanting'. Would very much like it if Bessie could come for lunch one day.

Letter from Robert Gathorne-Hardy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Mill House, Stanford Dingley, nr Reading, Berks. - Has received an invitation to the opening of the library [the Trevelyan Memorial Library at Birkbeck College, London] for which he thanks Elizabeth, but unfortunately he has a district council meeting then which he cannot miss. Would love to have seen her and heard Morgan Forster's address. Has proposed to Sir Edward Bridges the publication of a small private edition of the correspondence between Robert Bridges and Robert Calverley Trevelyan on prosody. He seems to agree and has sent him some typed copies. Asks if he may be allowed to print some of them.

Letter from Bertrand Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Paris. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter, which was forwarded to him; the Russells are on the first stage of their time abroad and their plans are uncertain. She is welcome to use his story of 'Destroy my library? Never!' [at the ceremony for the donation of R. C. Trevelyan's library to Birkbeck College, London; see 5/255 for the story]. Is glad she has got E. M. Forster to speak, and thinks he will do it very well.

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Glad to hear that Bessie is settled with such a nice couple. Would like to visit, but they are away on the Continent in September; asks if they might visit for a day when they return. The children [Russell's grandchildren?] are here now; they are going to Cornwall to stay with Dora until school starts in September. Mary [Fedden] and Julian must have had a 'glorious holiday' in the sun; the Russells were in luck to have the sun shine on them in 'that lovely azalea wood' where they walked with Bessie in May or June.

Letter from Robert Gathorne-Hardy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Mill House, Stanford Dingley, nr Reading, Berks. - Has written to tell Sir Edward Bridges that he can see the copy of his father's "Testament of Beauty" [a proof copy, with notes by R. C. Trevelyan] when he himself returns from Italy. Can 'almost compete with Julian over his story about the lion': relates a conversation he overhead in a Chelsea pub about an alligator in someone's room. Has not had an invitation to the opening of the library [the R. C. Trevelyan Memorial Library at Birkbeck College, London] but would love to attend.

Letter from Edward Bridges to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Goodman's Furze, Headley, Epsom. - Has got copies made of the correspondence between his father and her husband, which he sends, along with the twenty-two original letters she lent him from his father to her husband, and some from his mother and sister which he has not had copied. He also sends seven letters from her husband to his father and a copy of an eighth, the original of which was stuck into a book. Most of the letters were written in 1927 and 1928, and formed part of a series of letters preserved by his father from those to whom he had sent proof copies of the "Testament of Beauty". Has pencilled years on undated letters. He has no record of the comments and criticism which her husband made on this poem, and asks she would be willing to lend him the proof copies in which these were made. He also asks if he could be given the chance to acquire the letters if she ever thinks of parting with them.

Letter from Edward Bridges to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Goodman's Furze, Headley, Epsom. - Acknowledges with thanks the safe receipt of his father's letters to her husband. Will return them as soon as he has had them copied, also her husband's letters to his father (keeping copies for himself). Hopes one day a selection of his father's letters will be published; thinks that Gathorne-Hardy would like to publish a couple of the letters to her husband, but will write again before anything is decided.

Letter from Edward Bridges to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Goodmans Furze, Headley, Epsom. - Asks if he might have a typed copy made of the letters his father wrote to her husband, as he is trying to collect his father's letters. Recently heard from R. Gathorne-Hardy that she had shown him letters from Robert Bridges. Offers to have a typed copy made of her husband's letters to his father, or to return the originals and keep a copy himself.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Glad Bessie is in better health and spirits; he himself suffers but this is to be expected at nearly 89. Bessie's friend Mr Rees may visit I Tatti, and Berenson himself will be happy to see him if there and well enough. Molly Nicolson visited recently, before that Cyril Connolly; they are expecting Rosamond Lehmann and Ernest Hemingway. His book on Piero della Francesca will not appear before July.

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Bertie's fever seems to have been caused by an infected stitch; he has no temperature tonight for the first time in a week. He had an x-ray to check whether the organs disturbed during his [prostate] operation were causing trouble, but everything was normal. He should be able to go home soon, and they are both very happy.

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Thanks Bessie very much for offering to take in the Russells, but the workmen have finished at the Richmond house. However, Bertie has developed a slight fever, and must stay in hospital until it goes; she feels quite anxious, as the cause is not known, though the doctors insist there is no need to worry.

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Bertie is getting on very well [after his prostate operation]: 'looks like himself again - except painfully thin - and smokes his pipe like billy-o.' Has told him about Bessie's letter, and the excerpt from Dr [Karl] Bluth's letter; he was very pleased. He can only read light thrillers at the moment, but thanks Bessie for offering to send the "Persian Adventure". Will probably be able to go home in a week; their ceilings fell down just before Bertie's operation, so the house is 'full of builders and plastic and dust'. Is sorry to hear that the glare of the sun on the snow pains Bessie's eyes.

Letter from Leonore van Alphen to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Witte Huis. - The mild weather has turned to an 'old fashioned winter' so Arend [her son] has gone skating at Vinkeveen. Jan [her husband] has not yet been skating, but will do so when it turns less cold. He has been for a short stay in Mürren and Lauterbrunnen [Switzerland] as chef d'équipe of the Dutch students skiing group. Julie Graffman [her daughter] is staying here at the moment with her youngest child Sture; Holger [Julie's husband] is coming in about four days and they will all then travel to America. Six architects have also been staying, one of them Lucia [another daughter]'s husband [Van Ginkel]. Two of the architects are English - John Voelcker, and Peter Smithson, who knows Julian and 'thinks highly of him' - they are leaving tomorrow. All the architects love the Paddestoel [Lucia Hubrecht's house] and also think the Witte Huis 'very charming': how her aunt Bramine and Alphonse Grandmont 'knew how to live!', though she herself would like to be in Sicily [where Bramine Hubrecht and Alphonse Hubrecht also had a house] now for the winter. Sends her own love and that of Jan, who is sitting by the fire downstairs reading to Julie, Lucia, and the wife of a friend of Arend who works at the United Nations in America. Tante Liesje [?] is 'the same & well looked after'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Glad to hear about Bessie's 'two companions', both of whom she will need; he can manage to care for Janet with the help of one nurse, as she 'can still read but not walk'. Very glad about the 'Bickbeck RCT library. Nothing could be better'. His book ["A Layman's Love of Letters"] is out next week; will send her a copy. Ralph V[aughan] Williams will be coming to Cambridge frequently in February because of the rehearsals of his "Pilgrim's Progress", which is to be put on at the Guildhall.

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Bertie's operation yesterday was successful, according to the doctors, and he has made good progress. There were some complications, so the operation was 'frighteningly serious and took a long time'. He will probably be in hospital for about three weeks. Will give him Bessie's letter to read when the 'haze of drugs and pain' has gone.

Letter from Pau Casals to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Prades. - Has heard from Joachim [Röntgen] that Engelbert has arrived and intends to remain in Europe for good. Hopes that he has seen that America has many resources for art, and a people who are 'young, sympathetic, eager to learn'; all the same, for a European artist the time comes when the call of Europe is irresistible. He hopes very much to see Engelbert again. The next [Prades] Festival will be, like that of 1952, devoted to chamber music. Organisation is under way; 'things purely of the spirit seem very strange to the customs and the spirit of our times', but it is important to 'feed the flame'.

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