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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Notebook with translations and other works by R. C. Trevelyan

Prose note on 'religious and aesthetic emotions'. Verse, 'This love disease is a delicious/delightful trouble'. Translations by Trevelyan of the "Homeric Hymn to Demeter", fragments from tragedies by Sophocles, Euripides, and Aeschylus, an extract from Virgil ["Aeneid"] Book VI, Leopardi's "To his Lady" and "Canticle of the Wild Cock", Simonides 37, an extract from [Homer's] "Iliad" Book 24. Draft essay on aging and desire. Notes, in the style of Trevelyan's "Simple Pleasures". Autobiographical piece about a reading party at Blackgang Chine almost fifty years ago, with Cambridge friends such as Lytton Strachey, Roger Fry, Desmond MacCarthy and George Moore. Draft of "On Inspiration", published in "Windfalls". Translations of Catullus 2, 7, 12, and 50, Tibullus I.1, and Montaigne III.11 and III.6. Dialogue between 'Child' and 'Father'. Note on Saint Augustine's "Confessions". List of contents for the 1948 "From the Shiffolds" pamphlet. Notes for topic 'What does England mean to me?' and on old age.

Notebook used from other end in: list of books including [Beerbohm's] "Zuleika Dobson" and Ransome's "Great Northern?". Draft letter regarding the [re?] printing of Trevelyan's "Collected Works". Passage headed 'p. 15'; since this is followed by a review of Judson's "Life of Spenser", it may be an extract from that book. List of titles of essays, prefaces for translations, biographical pieces (Donald Tovey and C[lifford] A[llen], etc; perhaps future projects for Trevelyan. Draft piece on poets and poetry. Dialogue on the subject of translating poetry; piece "On Translating Greek Poetry", with notes on individual authors and quotations of passages. Pieces on translating Lucretius and the Greek Anthology; notes on translating Homer and Catullus; observations on a 'friendly critic' pointing out that 'too many' of Trevelyan's poems and essays begin with a scene of someone, usually the poet, 'walking meditatively in a wood' or lying beneath a tree. Translation of Tibullus III.19. Draft essay on Trevelyan's feelings about spiders, insects and other small creatures, and snakes; includes mention of a 'great philosopher' [Bertrand Russell or G. E. Moore?] disliking ants immensely.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Expects Bob will soon return, but has sent a ring [for his engagement to Elizabeth van der Hoeven] to his hotel; thinks it very beautiful and appropriate. Has not found time to do Bob's house but will go over soon and give instructions for the study and friezes. The 'accursed [Second Boer] war is upsetting everything'; has only forty-two people signed up for his lectures, which start in a week. Helen says he is too pessimistic, but he does not see there is 'much room for people like us in a blatant jingo inflated nation'. Supposes that 'the most incompetent toady' gets to the top of the army just as at the National Gallery and the S[outh] Kensington [Museum]. Discusses Bob's poem, which he likes very much, though is not sure he gets 'this kind of medioeval business as well as [he does] classical'. Has been reading some of the Franciscan poets: Jacopone [da Todi] is 'stunning'; also praises [Saint] Bonaventura's meditations. Has found 'a new and splendid subject' for Bob in the Gospel of Nicodemus, which is 'terrible extravagant & Byzantine'; has told it to [Laurence] Binyon but does not expect he will use it before Bob returns.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Little news: Helen is more or less the same, though he thinks her sisters' visits help and her brother is going to see her soon, and this stage might go on for some time. He and Goldie [Dickinson] are enjoying Roundhurst, though he has been up at the British Museum all the week. Saw Binyon: does not think the anthology ["Garland of New Poetry" (1899)?] will be good; it is mostly Miss Coleridge and a few others; thinks Binyon has closed the subscription list. Asks Trevelyan to tell Berenson he is working on the dating of pictures: mentions two works by Gentile [Bellini]. Augustus [Enticknap] has whooping cough. A separate sheet added as postscript encourages Trevelyan to write a simple letter to Helen with advice on what to put: thinks 'part of the depression comes from an idea that she has done wrong and people disapprove'. Thanks Trevelyan's mother: grapes would be welcome.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Tells her about a discussion with Bargman, the man who did the house for him, about damp, the possibility of putting in a baize door as Gussie [Enticknap] can be 'a little obstreperous' after tea; and burglars. Thinks perhaps he should have the library, as first decided. [His aunt Meg Price] says she will pay the extra when they want a grand piano if she is still alive, which is 'very generous'; he has suggested she gets them a Broadwood £40 upright, but her 'professional friend' will know best what will suit a small room. They must go and visit as soon as they can; she rather reproached Bob for not visiting. Gives the measurements for the table. Sends her a curl from his head; is wearing hers next to his heart. Thinks he will send "The [Lady's] Bat" and "Dryope", and perhaps some others, to the "Speaker"; Hammond, an editor he knows, thinks they may put them in. Can break off his tenancy of the Temple rooms whenever he likes, but should like to keep them for the summer; Sanger will probably find another tenant in the summer, though he may still marry, which Bob and Fry think would probably be best although his friend [Dora Pease] has treated him badly. Sanger is in financial difficulty, which Bob does not want to worsen. Thinks he will probably go to the Lizard for a few days at Easter. Has not yet written to the Borrowdale people [the Peppers] about the honeymoon, nor to her uncle, which he should do this evening. Does not anticipate that there will be any difficulties regarding the wedding, but he should check; will leave the precise date of the ceremony for her and her relations to choose. Asks if she has heard from the Grandmonts. Had a scare yesterday when his Shakespeare, two Greek books, and the manuscript of his play, which he had hidden in the woods then 'wandered off meditating' were taken home by a passing labourer; was in despair but the gamekeeper suggested where they might be. The [Second Boer] war is 'getting to a very unpleasant state': the 'war party are very brutal, breaking up meetings, rioting etc'. Thinks the Government has behaved 'shockingly' for not suppressing them, there has been much indignation against them which may do good in the end.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Discusses post times. The weather has been 'absolutely beastly' and he has a cold, which gave him a nose-bleed this morning. Took a day off yesterday and lunched with the Frys; [Roger] Fry is very busy, having had to give an extra lecture last week, so Bob conveys his advice on house decoration. Need good painters, as [George?] Moore had trouble when he was having his Cambridge rooms done, due to the 'stupidity of the workmen'. Gives his aunt Meg Price's address. Thinks he is becoming 'more romantic' about her; wishes he had been with her to 'caress... and explain away [his] last cruel letter' in which he thoughtlessly exaggerated his 'regret at [his] fading days of singleness' [9/119]. She will certainly not come between him and his friends, as she has 'quite enough of their own intellectual qualities to be their friend in the same way' he is. Has usually gone abroad alone and not allowed his 'sensations to be interfered with by those of others'; will probably enjoy going to Greece more with her than with 'people like Daniel and Mayor'. Attempts to explain his feelings in detail. Will be able to talk freely to his friends after his marriage, though 'it is true that men do talk more obscenely, and more blasphemously, than they ever quite dare to talk before women' and he thinks that this difference is right. Should not have written 'so carelessly' and caused her pain. Has written to her uncle saying he and she should fix the date. Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies came for tea last Sunday; he is probably going to the Lizard at Easter; he said his brother [Arthur?] and his wife went to Land's End for his honeymoon which was 'very satisfactory', but that Savernake near Salisbury plain was the 'best place conceivable', with 'every kind of scenery' only an hour from London. He says it has a good inn; Bob may look on his way to Cornwall. Seatoller [in Borrowdale] is very nice too, but much further away. Has not yet heard from Daniel how Sanger is; will tell Bessie [about Sanger's unhappy love affair] when he sees her; she guessed correctly that the woman was Dora. He and Fry still think it would have been best for them to marry, but that now seems unlikely; her treatment of him is 'not through heartlessness exactly... but owing to circumstances, and also to her rather unusual temperament'. Has done some work, and has been re-reading Flaubert's letters; feels more in sympathy with him than any other modern writer. His mother says Charles and George are thinking of giving Bessie a 'very pretty sort of box to keep music in'; wishes they would give them the flying trunk or carpet Bessie mentioned. They will have to content themselves with meeting in dreams, though it seems [Empedocle] Gaglio has a dream-carpet which will take him into Bessie's brain; still, he does not have a lock of her hair so Bob has a start.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Sorry to hear about Bessie's cold; hopes it has now gone. Has discovered some 'wonderful woodland places in the valley... the woods here are quite endless'. Impatiently waiting for spring; is usually in Italy in February and March. She should read Flaubert's letters; he expresses several things Bob feels but is 'too lazy' or lacks the power to explain. Is having difficulty getting into the right frame of mind to work, but thinks he has made his play better by his alterations. Has been reading some Heine and [Goethe's] "Faust" in German, but cannot really spare enough time for it. Much interested in the 'domestic politics' Bessie mentions, and would like to meet some more of her half-sisters; expects he will when he comes to the Netherlands soon. Asks her to thank her uncle for his kind letter; would like to leave the question of the post-marriage celebrations to her and her father; is always 'rather afraid of formal speeches and ceremonies' but would not object if they wanted it. Wonders how she likes "Wuthering Heights"; for him 'crude as it is in some ways... it beats almost all English novels'. Is pleased that [Alfred] Enticknap has got a permanent place at a nearby house, though he will still be able to do some work for him and even the Frys, who say he is a 'firstclass gardener'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Has been in town since Monday, and is taking the next train back to Dorking. Comments on her last letter, and their love. Will probably go to Cornwall on Wednesday 11th and stay a week. Went to Roger [Fry]'s lecture yesterday; Helen has had a slight attack of pleurisy and is unwell. Went with his mother to hear Isaye [sic: Eugène Ysaÿe] last Monday. The music box [which Charles and George intend as a wedding present] looks pretty; describes it and gives a sketch and section, with measurements; she must decide and he will tell George. Booa [Mary Prestwich] asks if he would like a small travelling clock or piece of silver as a present from the servants; she thinks the clock and he tends to agree; it is very kind of them and he will value it 'far more than its mere worth'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Hopes Julian has reached Taormina by now and is enjoying Sicily, though fears the almond blossom may be over. Has just heard from Nicky [Mariano] that she and B.B. [Bernard Berenson] may go to Zürich at the end of March to see the Lombard exhibition, but will definitely be back by 15 April. Sure they would like to see Julian, and would probably ask him to stay at I Tatti if he wrote to Nicky. All well here: Bessie likes Mrs Alexieff and gets on quite well with her secretary. He himself is 'fairly all right, though sometimes a little out of sorts'. Hopes Julian will like Sicily as much as Goethe did; he was afraid to go to Greece because of brigands, so went to Sicily and 'made up his mind' it must be just like Greece. Tells Julian to ask his friend [Daphne Phelps] whether she is related to his own old friend T[homas] T[ettrell] Phelps, whom he has not seen for years. Expects Julian has been to the Isola Bella, which used to belong to Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; he used to go and bathe there with Roger and Helen Fry. Roger painted a picture of Mount Etna seen through the Greek theatre, which Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] had in his rooms. Hopes Julian's car is 'behaving itself'. Bessie will write soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has to go to meet [Desmond] MacCarthy soon and may not finish letter in time for the post; hope matters [regarding the wedding] have cleared up. Glad it is settled about Turing; expect her uncle will arrange about the banns and talk to the Burgermaster [sic]. Saw the Frys today; is going with them to Roundhurst next Monday, to stay a night at the farm where he would like to spend the first days of their honeymoon; the nightingales will be 'wonderful', there are none in the North, and 'a honeymoon without nightingales would never do'. Fry thinks he should not miss the [Apostles'] dinner but they can discuss this. Some of his friends have 'combined' to give them the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry, which Bessie has seen; he likes it very much as a work of art; also as an instrument, though not perhaps as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch; thinks it a 'splendid present'. [Bernard] Berenson is the 'chief contributor'; will send her the list of the contributors, about twenty of them, soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is soon starting for Paddington to catch the train to Cornwall. Yesterday, heard [Roger] Fry's last lecture and saw the Sickerts, then went to Holman Hunt's. They were 'very nice, and so was their beautiful daughter, Gladys'; though Hunt is sometimes a little tedious. Mrs Holman Hunt would like to meet Bessie. Draws an eye to look at her and lips to kiss her.

Notebook with translations and other works by R. C. Trevelyan

List of books on flyleaf, including [R.G.?] Collingwood's "An autobiography". Autobiographical fragment, including Trevelyan's childhood 'courting' of a girl at dancing class, friendships including two 'of an emotional, romantic kind' at Harrow, and thoughts on Keats's "Ode to a Nightingale". Translations: of first part of Sophocles' "Philoctetes"; the "Homeric Hymns to Pan, Dionysus, Aphrodite and Demeter; fragments of Greek New Comedy by Menander, Alexis and Philemon.

Book used from other end in: draft verse [translation?] on inside cover and flyleaf; list of possible topics under the heading "More Windfalls", including '[George?] Meredith', Reminiscences', '[Donald] Tovey'. Draft piece, "On losing one's bearings". Verse, 'Oh sea and shore, dearer to me than life...'. Ideas for "Less Simple Pleasures" under headings such as 'Literary', "Of Friendship', 'Of Walking'. Essay of pleasures of the senses. particularly touch. Piece about Horace and his friendships, perhaps as introduction for Trevelyan's two fictional dialogues about him, or part of the subsequent discussion of conversation. This mentions Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, Roger Fry and Donald Tovey (Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey are also mentioned but Trevelyan then crosses this out)'; Henry Sidgwick, his father's friend, is mentioned as a 'perfect artist in conversation'. Discussion of philosophical dialogues. Biographical sketch of Thomas Sturge Moore. Piece on aging and desire. Notes on playing chess with Dickinson. Notes on Montaigne. Bertrand Russell and Bernard Shaw. Essay on the self, Buddhism, and change.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst,. - Has opened and looked at Trevelyan's Harunobu print and congratulates him on the purchase. Fry will make Berenson envious when they meet, as Mrs [Mary] Costelloe came over to Roundhurst the other day: it was a struggle for her to conceal her feelings. Went to Friday's Hill [home of the Pearsall Smiths] yesterday. No fresh news from Roehampton [of Helen Fry]: sometimes it seems impossible to go on. Will leave on Thursday with much regret as the house and Goldie [Dickinson] have made life bearable; thinks he will go to 12 Pembroke Square, Mrs Sickert's house. He and Goldie slept out in Trevelyan's field two nights ago.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Dorking. - Has 'spent all day dancing upon the tight-plank' to stencil a frieze for Bob's hall, since the decorator was a 'confounded duffer' and would have ruined the design; thinks it will be 'rather jolly' but despairs about the sitting room. Asks Bob to thank his mother for letting her ladies' club know [the Grosvenor Crescent Club] about his lectures; has sent some more prospectuses and tickets, but they are now selling well, 'So the war hasn't quite destroyed everything yet'. Will 'jump at the idea' of [illustrating?] Bob's translations, would 'like them to be in a Lorenzo Monaco style'. The ring [for Bob's engagement to Elizabeth van der Hoeven] can certainly be made smaller.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Glad to hear that [Joseph] Joachim was so nice to her; hopes she also enjoyed her evening with the Piersons. Has talked to his father, who has convinced him that they should invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding, as a relative; admits that it would be strange not to do so in England. Told his father it may cause difficulties with the Grandmonts; but he replied that politics should not enter into the matter. In a way it would be a slight to his father, since he wishes it, not to invite them; he would in that case not come over. Thinks that the Howards would not be 'much in the way' at the wedding, especially as his brothers and parents will be there; does not think him 'a bad fellow, and she, though dull, was quite harmless'; will not deny it would be pleasanter if they did not come. More serious if the Grandmonts really object; understands their feelings, though thinks them 'wrong and unreasonable'; they are among Bessie's best friends and good friends of his too, and it is through them that he and Bessie know each other; would be a great pity if they did not come. Does not think the fact her uncle, who will send the invitations, does not know the Howards is 'essential'. She will have to explain the situation to him; then the Grandmonts should probably be told as soon as possible so that they can make a decision. He or his father could write to her uncle to explain if she prefers.

The marriage conditions are all right; both he and his father will write to her uncle about them. Is going to Cambridge tomorrow and will see Tom Moore; wants to read him the two finished acts of the play. Will probably 'take wings' on Saturday evening: become an 'angel' and 'cease to be an active member of the Society of Apostles'. [Oswald?] Sickert is probably coming to Dorking the Sunday after; has worked well recently, and a few visitors will not make much difference. Sanger is back and seems well again, from the little Bob has seen of him. Has been to the tailors and it is hard to find material of the kind she wants; sends some more patterns, which he thinks will look lighter when made up and were lighter than the ones he wore for Roger [Fry's] wedding. The travelling clock which the servants have given them is very good; there was a note with it in Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s handwriting, which he copies out. Wants to write them a thank-you note, but is unsure how to address it; had better ask his mother.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - It is very good of her to see the matter [his father's wish that Sir Henry Howard and his wife be invited to the wedding] the way she does; not possible for 'these sort of things' to be ideal; does not think the Howards will really spoil much, and hopes the Grandmonts will not be 'unreasonable' and come too. Had to tell his father of the Grandmonts' objections or he would been angry when he called on Sir Henry at the Hague and found he had not been invited. His father does not know Sir Henry well, but his aunt [Alice] Dugdale does, and in general his family 'are on very good terms with the Howards of Corby, though not very closely related'. His relations would very likely be offended if Sir Henry were not invited; does not particularly care about Aunt Alice, but his father does, and he does care for his Aunt Margaret and does not know how she would react. Sanger is engaged, and therefore quite recovered. True that she [Dora Pease] 'behaved so badly to him' and there is a doubt whether she is really in love with him, but Bob is optimistic; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson knows more and is reassuring; Bob has not yet seen Roger. Expects Sanger's wedding will be in July or August; wonders whether Bessie will like Dora, as people often do not and she has plenty of faults; yet she is not heartless. Splendid that Sanger is 'so miraculously cured'. Thinks he will go to Dorking on Thursday; MacCarthy and Sickert are coming to visit. Will write more later of what he did in Cambridge. Curious about Lily H[odgkin]; did know she was there [Dresden] and had just written to thank her for returning a book he lent her two years ago. Is glad to have her new photos, though does not think them very good.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear they are all well; Caroline sends love; a 'cuckoo for ever calling here' makes him think of 'the dear little boy' [Paul] and of 'Will Shakespeare'. They have just finished Hogg [his life of Shelley], and thinks more of Hogg 'in his queer way' than ever; has been reading a Macmillan edition of Shelley: 'What a poet!'. Has read [Roger] Fry's article in the Burlington Magazine, and paid a second visit to the illuminated manuscripts [exhibition at the Burlington Fine Arts Club] yesterday before leaving London; has also looked through the British Museum facsimiles here and at Grosvenor Crescent. Hopes Fry's wife will 'go on satisfactorily'. The 'Doctorate business' [his forthcoming honorary degree at Cambridge] is 'very plain sailing': Lord Halsbury, Lord Rayleigh, and Sir James Ramsey will also be staying at [Trinity College] Lodge; they lunch at [Gonville &] Caius, whose Master [Ernest Roberts] is Vice Chancellor. Others receiving honorary degrees are: the Duke of Northumberland; Admiral Sir John Fisher; Charles Parsons; Sir James Ramsay; Sir W[illiam] Crookes; Professor Lamb; Professor Marshall; Asquith; Lord Halsbury; Sir Hubert Herkomer; Sir Andrew Noble; Rudyard Kipling; Professor Living; they will 'advance on the Senate House...like the English at Trafalgar'. in two columns. Is looking forward to dinner in the hall at Trinity. Went to Harrow on Tuesday and will tell Robert about it and about the 'Cacciola affair'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8 Grosvenor Crescent, London S.W. - Has come to London to be nearer to Bessie in her 'difficulties'; his train was late so his parents were out when he arrived, but will talk to them later. Does not think they will yet have had a letter from her. 'Grieved' she reproaches herself for writing as she did [about her uncle's reaction to the idea of inviting Sir Henry Howard]; does not think he was wrong to tell his father but understands why she might think he was. As for his mother's letter, he understands why Bessie has appealed directly to his father. His father has sent him a copy and he thinks it may hold out 'a hope of his coming' to the wedding after all. Thinks the best solution is for the Howards to be invited and his father come; is now anxious about how her uncle will take his mother's letter, which is meant to be conciliatory; her uncle has no right to be angry with her. His father is not offended; even less so than when he first learnt of the Grandmonts' possible reaction to Sir Henry being invited. Further discussion of the situation. Will come over earlier if she wants him to, otherwise will cross next Monday and stay in the same hotel. If this matter is settled, may go to Roundhurst with the Frys on Friday, where he wants to take her before the [Apostles'] dinner. Is glad she does not mind him going; it is not in Cambridge but London, where they could perhaps stop the night at a hotel. Will bring over her underclothes and the spectacles. Is sorry Alice Jones minded so much about the civil marriage; 'Church people in England are often very difficult on such matters, but Alice is 'evidently very nice, and very fond' of Bessie. Tells Bessie to get Dutch books with their [Alice and Herbert Jones's] present; would not have her 'unDutched for the world'. Glad his last letter gave her 'so much joy and confidence'.

Letter from Helen Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

S[ant]a Caterina, Siena. - Never knows 'what to say on these occasions, this seems only less difficult than [her] own engagement'. Has so many good wishes it is hard to say them, and even 'wonderful' Siena does not 'inspire [her] as much as the thought of writing felicitations to a POET overawes [her]'. She and 'Ro' [Roger Fry] hope that if Miss van der Hoeven comes to England before the marriage that she will visit them. Hopes to see Trevy at Milan, where they will arrive on the 30th [of November]; Roger sends love.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Was glad to get Bob's two letters and hear he had arrived safely at Milan. Forwarded some letters to Ravello on Sunday which Bob's mother had sent her, with 'a very kind note' [originally enclosed]; Bob is a 'naughty son' not to give her his Ravello address in time, and she will send it to her tomorrow. Thinks she would like Bob's mother to call her Elizabeth, as she asks; her English friends do, and then she will reserve 'Bessie' for 'more intimate purposes'. Also encloses a letter from [Alphonse] Grandmont which might entertain him, as might 'the bad poem in the beginning'. Is glad Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is being so helpful; shows he 'has regained his common sense' after quarrelling with Mademoiselle Thomley and getting 'away from under her influence', now he is 'much with the Dahlerups'. Hopes this letter will greet Bob on his arrival at Ravello, and that he enjoys 'all the good, beautiful things of life' there and gets some good work done. Asks if he remembered to give his letter to Mrs [Helen] Fry, and to buy himself some 'foreign paper' and a razor strop. If not she will have to think of him as 'a shaggy Robinson Crusoe-like poet' writing 'poems and love-letters on odd ends of paper... used by the peasants to wrap up their fruit'; has been enjoying seeing her own paper sent back 'bedabbled' with Bob's dear but 'very untidy and cook-like writing'. Had her photograph taken this morning; it happened so quickly that she did not have time to think 'what kind of simpering smile' would suit her best; will send Bob one. People keep asking to see Bob's photograph and are surprised when she does not have one.

Jeanne Salomonson stayed till Sunday morning. On Friday night Bessie's aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven]'s two sisters [Alida and Agatha] came to visit with a girl who is living with them for a while, 'a most horribly uninteresting dull & unartistic kind of being' who yet had the 'pretence of being very musical'. playing the piano abominably but trying 'the most difficult & beautiful things'; felt 'rubbed up the wrong way' when she went to bed, 'horribly sarcastic & terribly sour'. Mr Kattendijke came on Saturday to accompany Jeanne and they did some 'wonderful Brahms songs'; on Sunday they went to a piano recital by Harold Bauer which was partly quite good, but at the end he played 'such horrid firework things' that it nearly spoilt everything else and made him think less of him. Has had a nice letter from Madame Goriany, the Austrian lady Bob met at Roccabella [Taormina, Sicily]. Is working hard on the translation for Ambro [Hubrecht] about 'the absorption of fatty matter into the intestine'. Their cousins, the van Deldens, and their daughter are coming tonight; soon they are going south and then perhaps to the Dutch colonies. Has written to Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s mother about the violin, and is curious to know the answer.

Continues the letter next day: is going to spend the day in Leiden, first calling on a 'dear cousin' [Louise Hubrecht] who has known her since childhood and lunching with Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] at her mother's. Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht] appeared suddenly at dinner; an enormous whale was stranded on the coast two days ago, and he has secured it for his university [Utrecht]; she has been able to give back her translation as the usual man is well again; he says he has sent his 'American speech' to Ravello. A pity the Frys cannot visit [on the way back from Italy]; hopes to see them soon.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Has found Trevelyan's 'original' [?] and sends it. Also sends his translation of the sonnet about Jacopo [Bellini] and Pisanello [enclosed]: Leonhard Sickert's suggestion that 'onfesce' equals 'offere' is obviously right, and 'fidia' is Pheidias. Saw Helen: her improvement is maintained though she was much the same today.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - [Reginald Brimley] Johnson has written, and Fry is going to see him on Tuesday [about Bob's book, "Polyphemus and Other Poems", with illustrations by Fry]. Looking forward to Wallington; wishes Bob could put off his visit to Glasgow [the International Exhibition?] so they could go together, but supposes it is impossible. Has hardly seen B.B. [Bernard Berenson] but has 'heard more than enough of him': will tell Bob about this later. Apologises for 'disconnectedness' as Julian [his son] is 'helping' to write this. has discovered a very interesting picture at the Gibsons' house which they though was worthless but which he has cleaned and found 'a very good Florentine Madonna and child underneath'. Too hot here, but has found a 'new & much finer bathing place'. Thinks from what Johnson says that they will be able to arrange about the books; twelve illustrations would do and should cost about thirty or forty pounds to print.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from John Luce to R.C. Trevelyan

1490260 Gun. Luce, J. M., A Battery B Sub Section, 207 A.A. Trug. Ret. R.A., Devizes, Wiltshire. - Is happy to learn Trevelyan is 'emending Horace'; asks to see the 'iconoclastic epistle' if Joan [Allen?] does not mind. Thanks him for the offer of books. Has seen Desmond [MacCarthy's] article on Roger Fry's biography [by Virginia Woolf]. Agrees that [Dick?] Bosanquet's three most recent poems are most interesting, but none are as original as his first group. Has provided some criticism, at Bosanquet's request, and wishes Trevelyan would criticise his metrical form. Expects Joan has told Trevelyan something of his daily routine, which is fairly monotous, though enlivened by his 'Jesuit and musician friends'. Recently had scores of the Mozart operas sent, and they ran through "Don Giovanni"; next Saturday they will try "The Magic Flute". Sends love to Bessie, Ursula and Julian.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Met the 'old postman' on his way back from the station so got her letter early; tipped the postman a shilling last week so he did not mind handing it over, and probably 'knows the sort of person these constant Dutch letters come from' and sympathises with Bob's eagerness. Glad that her letter was so cheerful. If the legal papers are long delayed, expects he will be able to sign them in Holland; if it is just a matter of a few days will be better to wait and sign them here. Thinks she is right that the Flushing route is best to travel back on. Does not know which hotel his parents will stay at [in the Hague]; thinks his father mentioned this in the letter to her uncle; thinks he himself will stay at the Twee Stede. Needs to get a topper; if he gets one in the Hague this will save taking a hat box. His mother has knitted him a white tie; asks if this would do. If his father's letter does not decide her uncle against it, she must tell him that Bob is 'very strongly against it'; though he would give in if there turns out to be a reason such as her aunt wanting it. Aunt Annie [Philips]'s silver candlesticks have come and are 'very splendid'; Mr [Charles Augustus] Fitch, the Trevelyans' clergyman in Northumberland, 'has sent a very pretty little silver mustard pot'. Hopes that Madame Dolmetsch, who sometimes visits the Frys, will come to play the clavichord; Dolmetsch could get them the Bach clavichord music; Bob is sure Bessie could play it 'well enough to please [him]', anyway he looks on the clavichord 'more as a picture than as an instrument. The roses are coming up well. Thoughts about married happiness Glad she likes 'P. & P.' ["Pride and Prejudice"] which is 'great fun'. May go to Roundhurst for a night with the Frys if it is fine on Saturday; will probably go to London on Monday. Expects she will bring her bicycle over.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Will not be able to sign the deeds till Wednesday so thinks he should stay in England then cross that night, though his father thinks they could be signed in Holland. Has ordered the beds, which cost more than a pound each than was printed in the catalogue as the '[Second Boer] war has sent up iron and labour considerably'; discussion of pillows and mattresses; [Roger] Fry recommended a 'spring or woollen [sic] mattress underneath the French'. Sophie [Wicksteed]'s Carlyle and Meredith have come. Will go over to the Frys now to see if they are coming to Roundhurst with him tomorrow. Lily H. [Hodgkin?] and her sister have sent some brass candlesticks and a glass jar.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Glad to hear Bessie is all right. Teases her about his 'wedding presents from young ladies'. Is going to Roundhurst with the Frys now, unless they do not think the weather fine enough. Sorry he did not send the marriage contract; thought his father had done so; will get it amended before he comes over, which he expects will be Wednesday night. Will bring over his silk white tie for her to see, Will go up to London on Monday, staying at Hare Court. Glad the H's [Howards] called, which should make "matters quite simple now". Quotes the first lines of "Midsummer Night's Dream", changing 'Hippolyta' to 'Elizabeth'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Seems Bob may be staying longer in Milan; is sorry for the Frys as Roger Fry is suffering from a bald cold. Has received a parcel from Bob's mother with photographs of his parents and brothers and is very glad to have them. Is glad Bob is enjoying himself at Milan and seeing many beautiful things; curious he has never been before; she remembers the "Cenacolo" [Leonardo's "Last Supper"] 'above all others', and many beautiful things at the Brera, though she and Bramine [Hubrecht] were there during a thunderstorm when it was very dark; looks forward to going again. Bob must not be 'too anxious' about her: she has got over her initial misery at their parting and now he is 'haunting [her] only pleasantly', as he says; she could not be made miserable by thoughts of him as she loves him too much; also trusts him completely.

Returns to the letter in the evening; has been out in the rain to see the dentist and 'arrange a torture hour with him', though less needs to be done than she feared; tonight is Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht]'s third lecture, and Paul [his son] has come to see the whale [see 8/14] and will probably go to the lecture on her ticket. Her aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven] has had a letter from Bramine, with an 'enthusiastic account' of how they [the Grandmonts?] are looking after the eye patients [at Taormina] and how helpful Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is now. Returns the next day to scold Bob for saying that 'modern art scarcely seems to exist' in Italy; says this is too sweeping a statement and fears 'Fry's dogmas' have been influencing him after all; hopes he will always 'be as inclusive as possible'. Went to Ambro's lecture after all; Paul stayed at home and worked, and this morning has gone to keep an eye on the work of cutting off the fat and baring the skeleton of the whale; he sends many greetings to Bob. The Frys' name for her sounds 'very splendid indeed' and is certainly better than 'Amoretta' which reminds her of 'amourette', a pet hate of hers; she would still like him to call her Bessie or Bess. Very good of him to send her a ring; she will always wear it on the fourth finger of her left hand; a shame he will not be able to put it on her finger and he will have to wear it somehow first.

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