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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven, with extract from poem based on the "Mahabharata" by Trevelyan

Begins mid-sentence stating that [his brother George's book "The Age of Wycliffe"] is 'a good piece of history', which shows up John of Gaunt as 'a sort of 14th century Taman[n]y ring boss'. Also recommends Rostand's "Les Romanesques", which he read recently and things is even better than "Cyrano". Cannot think of any more modern books for the moment; fears his list is 'chiefly composed of friends' and relations' books'; [Roger] Fry is also bringing out his book on Bellini soon, which is well worth getting. Asks Elizabeth to tell Mrs Grandmont that the Frys would like her to visit when she is in England; gives their address. He himself is getting a house near Dorking at Westcott, and will move in September, when he will be within a mile of the Frys; the house he is giving up at Haslemere is, though, very beautiful. Supposes she has been back from Taormina a while; asks her to send some photographs, especially the ones of 'Mrs. Cacc. [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan] and the dogs' and himself in the loggia. The last few days of scirocco were 'a great bore', but he almost forgives it for preventing the trip up Monte Xerito as it 'made [them] those splendid waves among the rocks'; it also 'put [Elizabeth's] fiddle out of sorts' though, so he could not hear any more Bach suites. Heard Isaye [sic: Ysaÿe] play one yesterday, as well as the Mendelsohn concerto; he was in good form, and he will hear him again playing the Beethoven. Is having a musical week, as he has already seen Paderewski, for the first time, and will hear [Wagner's] "Tristram" tomorrow. 'Paddy was great fun, at all events to look at'; thinks he played a Chopin concerto better than the Beethoven. Spends most of his time at the British Museum library when he is in London; has found a translation of [Joost van den] Vondel there by a Dutch American; it is 'very conscientious and scholarly' but he does not think much of the blank verse; still, he can now go on where Elizabeth left off. Would like to know when Mrs G[randmont] is coming to England, and if Elizabeth is likely to be in London so he can 'make a display of [his] extensive and profound knowledge of Italian painting in the National Gallery'. Not sure whether he is going to Bayreuth yet; discusses times he could come to Holland.

Suggests older books she should read: Keats's letters, most of which are available in Sidney Colvin's edition though he advises getting Buxton Forman's four volume edition with the poetry; Butcher and Lang's translation of the "Odyssey"; Meinhold's "Sidonia the Sorceress" and "Amber Witch", translated by Lady Wilde and Lady Duff Gordon. Could lend her all of these books, as well as [Henry James's] "In a Cage" and his brother and father's books . Asks her to write with news and to say when would be best for him to come to Holland; he will write soon to the Grandmonts when he sends them [Thomas Sturge?] Moore's book. Thinks he remembers Elizabeth said she had never read Jane Austen; she should read them all, especially "Mansfield Park", "Pride and Prejudice" and "Emma". Breaks off mid -sentence: 'by advising to...': 9/71 forms the rest of the letter.

A portion of what seems to be a poem by Robert Trevelyan based on the "Mahabharata", with some explanatory notes, is found with this letter but not referred to in it

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Has returned [to Westcott], as the Frys thought it was not fine enough weather to go to Roundhurst; will therefore be here until Monday until he goes up [to London]. Bargman will begin his various jobs on the house after Robert has left; Robert is 'not sure about the door to keep out the sound' and wonders whether it should be left until Elizabeth is there. Has lived 'in complete piece lately in the little room' so does not know how much the noise [made by young Gussie Enticknap] is 'a real nuisance'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Saw Helen yesterday and today; took her Bob's book ["Mallow and Asphodel"], in which 'I forged yr. initials & her name in yr. handwriting', thinking this would make it 'more valuable to her'. Upset at first to find how ill she was, and 'how hopeless it seemed to arrive at her real self at all', but spent several hours with her; Edith Coombe [Helen's sister] was there throughout. Towards the end Helen woke up, asked questions about her friends and the harpsichord [which she is decorating for Dolmetsch] and seemed much pleased by the book, responding to Fry's prompts about Bob's reading to them at Taormina; also discussed a picture by Fry hanging in her room. This was all an improvement and 'quite astonished Dr Chambers'; she was quieter today but seemed easier with him; hopes he will be able to do her some good and will visit every day unless it excites her too much; very hard to 'keep up a one sided conversation for 3 hrs' and feels quite drained at the end. Asks Bob to help by writing to Helen, talking of 'simple things & yr. fondness for her - everything which gives her an idea of her own importance & helpfulness to others is good', and by giving Fry 'interesting & amusing things about people & books' to talk about with her. Is finding his writing very hard, since Helen 'seems all important' and he cannot bring himself to care 'a tuppenny damn' about 'the date of Bissolo's death', but it is a good distraction. Knows Bob will help.

Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W; addressed to Elizabeth at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is coming to Dorking tomorrow; does not expect her to be in as he could not give her longer notice, but will take his chance; tells her not to alter any arrangements she may have as he will be quite happy, and perhaps call on the Frys.

Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland; addressed to Bob at 29 Beaufort Street, Chelsea, and forwarded to the National Liberal Club. - Is glad the show [an art exhibition organised by Roger Fry] is coming to Cambridge; has only even seen prints and engravings; has written to [Arthur] Shipley. Bob won the battle [of toy soldiers]. Had 'two splendid days' stalking and driving grouse with Howey and Shade.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Trin[ity College, Cambridge]. - Was sent an invitation for Bob from [Charles?] Pope to play in the '[Harrow] Old Boy's match' on 21 October by mistake, and 'by an even greater mistake' has torn it up. Hears occasional news of Bob and his 'ménage'; asks when he is coming for a visit. The exhibition is 'a great success', with 'all the mode[s]t virtues and staring faults of the impressionists well-represented'; [Roger] Fry's pictures 'are among the most generally liked'. Some of the paintings 'are very good, and all interesting'; George went to an 'advertisement debate' about them yesterday at Wallstein's [sic: Charles Waldstein], for the Walpole Society.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Bob's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] came out just after everyone had left Cambridge, but George will do 'all [he] can for it next term'. Likes it 'so very much', and has ordered six copies to give as presents. Thinks Roger [Fry's] illustrations 'very romantic and beautiful', and that they 'illustrated and explained & enlarged the idea of the poems a great deal'. Discusses the poems; thinks "The [Lady's] Bat" 'much the best thing' Bob has done, and 'in the way the most serious'. Lord Rosebery's speech 'a funny business': he 'said things that any Pro Boer would have been lynched for saying' after criticising pro-Boers 'more strongly than anyone'; George hopes what he says will 'get into common parlance'. Says that he himself 'went mad for two months last autumn... and saw men as idiots walking'; he wrote 'an exceedingly mad article... in which a lot of truth was buried in a hopeless amount of bunkum'; hopes Bob will not judge him on it if he sees it.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Bob's letter gave George 'the very greatest pleasure'. Will be in the south in the middle of October, and will come to see Bob and Bessie then or as soon as he can, which will be 'great fun'. The 'other poet that inhabits that neighbourhood, Meredith, has invited George to visit him this autumn with Theodore [Llewelyn Davies]; has often discussed Meredith's poems and 'view of life' with Theo, and Goldie [Lowes Dickinson]. When George visits Meredith, he will see what he can do [in terms of arranging a visit?] for Bob and Roger [Fry]; asks Bob not to tell anyone else that George knows Meredith. Sends love to Elizabeth; Bob should tell her 'not to break all the dishes' before George comes in October. Postscript: Tom [Sturge Moore] has sent George his "Altdorfer"

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens. - Thanks Bob for "[The Birth of] Parzival", which he and Jan think is a 'great success', as do the Frys [Roger and Helen], whom George has just seen. They all agree on its poetic qualities, and are more involved and moved 'by the subject and the idea' than by anything Bob has written previously. George thinks it 'almost immeasurably better than "[Cecilia] Gonzaga"', though sees how that taught him to write this. Mentions the themes, passages and a line he likes best. Nothing has yet happened here [a reference to the forthcoming birth of his daughter Mary Caroline]. A postscript on the last page mentions the part of Bob's poem he thinks 'least good'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Old Hotel, Dungeon Ghyll, Langdale, Nr. Ambleside. - Bob and Roger [Fry] will be pleased that a 'memorial [memorandum] about Finland" which is soon to be sent to the Duma [Russian Parliament] has been much signed by British MPs. Has had a long talk with Cecil Spring Rice, the British minister at Stockholm - not [his relative] Tom - who knows about the affair as the 'Swedes are so deeply interested'. There is some hope that the 'change may be of a more limited character than is threatened'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Hopes Julian has reached Taormina by now and is enjoying Sicily, though fears the almond blossom may be over. Has just heard from Nicky [Mariano] that she and B.B. [Bernard Berenson] may go to Zürich at the end of March to see the Lombard exhibition, but will definitely be back by 15 April. Sure they would like to see Julian, and would probably ask him to stay at I Tatti if he wrote to Nicky. All well here: Bessie likes Mrs Alexieff and gets on quite well with her secretary. He himself is 'fairly all right, though sometimes a little out of sorts'. Hopes Julian will like Sicily as much as Goethe did; he was afraid to go to Greece because of brigands, so went to Sicily and 'made up his mind' it must be just like Greece. Tells Julian to ask his friend [Daphne Phelps] whether she is related to his own old friend T[homas] T[ettrell] Phelps, whom he has not seen for years. Expects Julian has been to the Isola Bella, which used to belong to Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; he used to go and bathe there with Roger and Helen Fry. Roger painted a picture of Mount Etna seen through the Greek theatre, which Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] had in his rooms. Hopes Julian's car is 'behaving itself'. Bessie will write soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Sorry he did not return earlier and see Julian, and must try to visit him at Mayortorn[e] this term; glad he and Elizabeth had such a good time in the Netherlands; he also enjoyed his time in Italy, though he did get a mild case of the mumps. The people he stayed with were burning old letters, and gave him some old stamps, 'mostly Russian and German' which may be valuable; also sends some modern ones which Julian can use as swaps if he has them. [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is visiting; he hoped to see the azaleas but they are late flowering this year; they heard nightingales singing last night; asks if Julian knows which of the poets who 'has a street called after him in the new suburb of Hurtenham [his imaginary town]' wrote a poem about nightingales. Saw [Gordon] Luce, 'who also has the honour of a street', in Paris, and visited various oriental museums with him; Luce then went to Marseille to board his ship; very sad that he will not return from Burma for three or four years. Glad that Julian is 'now in the second class'. When in Italy, paid several visits the father of Miss [Avice] Trench [a teacher at Julian's school, Mayortone] at his 'beautiful villa'. Alice and Peter [Elms] have had bad colds, but are now recovering.

Quotes from a poet who 'has not yet had a Hurtenham street called after him' [Julian?] but is still much interested in that city; has been reading the April number of his magazine, which seems 'on the whole a very well-written publication' and the spelling shows a 'marked improvement'. The 'affair of the ghosts is very remarkable'; would like to visit Hurtenham and bring his 'friend Roger Fry the art-critic, who would write an account of this interesting ghostly statuary for the Burlington Magazine'. Happy to be home; Italy 'very beautiful, but no more than here, though some day they 'must all go to Italy together'. Must stop now, as Dickinson wants him to play chess.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Addressed to Julian at 7 Villa Brune, Paris XIVᵉ, France. - Has ordered a copy of Roger [Fry's] book ["Characteristics of] French Art" to be sent to Julian. Will arrive at Paris Gard [sic: Gare] du N[ord] at 18.10 on Monday; if Julian does not have time to meet him at the station, he could come to find him at the [Hotel de] Londres.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Addressed to Julian at 7 Villa Brune, Paris XIVe, France; forwarded to him c/o Thos Cook, Cannabière [sic: Canebière], Marseille. - Roger Fry has written to him from Hotel Récamier​, Paris; does not know whether he is still there, or whether Julian is in Paris, but if so he might like to look him up. Is reading Madame [Maria] Germanova's 'article to the 19th Century', which is 'rather a forlorn hope'; the "English Review" refused it. Bessie will probably go to the Netherlands on Sunday, having put her journey off due to a cold from which she seems to have recovered now.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St (on headed notepaper for National Liberal Club, Whitehall Place, S.W.). - Called on Edward's mother this afternoon since he has been ordered to go abroad by his doctor; when he said that he was probably going to a village 'in the hills near Paestum to spend a month or two by himself', Mrs Marsh 'immediately decided' that Edward should go with him; says he said it was a long journey to take for a stay of three weeks, and that if Edward had wanted to go he would have proposed it himself; did not mention that a long stay alone 'with an individual who has theories on the state of the English language which... are tedious when repeated overmuch' would be tedious for him. Does say, though that he could 'conceive [of] nothing more delightful' than for Edward to come; he would be working much of the time, and hopes his temper would be better; would not go to see places except for Pompeii and Paestum which are near, but that would not stop Edward 'playing the giddy dog at Naples or Rome or M[onte] Carlo' as much as he liked. Is going to a village called Corpo di Cava recommended by Roger Fry, who has spent time painting there. Leaving on Tuesday; Mrs Marsh says that Edward could not leave until Wednesday, and he could wait till then or meet him in Paris, but cannot wait longer as he wants 'to get out of this damned fog'; tells Marsh to telegraph if he wants to come. Will 'accept any reasonable modification of place' but it must be 'hot and quiet'. Found Marsh's sister playing children's games with the Sunday school children; she was 'quite exhausted, and the canary was carried into the drawing room in a fit'. Tells Edward that if he saw Bob's last letter to his brother, he should read ' [John Frederick?] Dobson' for 'Drummond'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Mons Martius, Corpo di Cava. - Starts this letter on top of 'an extinct volcano' he has named 'Mons Martius' in Marsh's honour; had meant to finish it here, but the mountain is 'at such an unclimable angle' and there are 'such interesting insects' in the trees that he will have to finish it in the valley. Has given the mountain Marsh's name as some consolation for him 'being unable to come to a place which is without exaggeration the most perfect place in the world'. Describes a local monastery [La Trinità della Cava] with 'a very valuable library', a school for young Italian aristocrats, a 'fair picture gallery' and a church with an organ 'said to be one of the best in Italy'. Bob goes to the abbey, takes out a 'huge Dante' from the library, and is given a cell 'overlooking a precipice, with a waterfall' in which to work, though he usually employs the Dante as a 'mask' to do his own work. Some days he works or reads outdoors; the hills, all volcanic craters, take 'about half an hours easy climbing', and give 'splendid' views from the top. He finds the monks 'very pleasant' though conversation 'in the hash of Italian Latin and French' which they have to use is 'rather difficult'. The pension where he currently the only guest is 'enormous'; the people are nice, but cannot speak French, except for the waiter Celafino. Fortunate that he is 'a good sort, and quite well educated', as he is 'the only person' with whom Bob can have anything like a conversation; he is a protestant, 'converted by an evangelical English household at Naples', so Bob 'pretend[s] to be a zealous churchman' and they both 'laugh at the priests and their fooleries'.

Supposes Marsh is in London now; asks him to write and say if there is anything new 'in the way of theatres, books etc'. When he left, everyone was reading Max Nordau's "Degeneracy", though 'swearing at him' as they read it; they 'recognise most of the moods and symptoms as parts of their own personality and like to see their minds disected [sic] and analysed though they quarrel with him when he tells them that they are hopeless cases'. He himself thinks the book is 'supremely absurd, though fascinatingly interesting, and cleverly written'. 'Poor Roger Fry has been quite conquered by it' and is persuaded he is 'a mattoid and a circulair and a hundred other things'; Marsh should go to see Fry's latest portraits, especially the one of 'Miss [Sybil] Palgrave which is in a new and more ambitious style'. Has heard that [Robert?] Kitson was in Rome, and has written to invite him for a few days, but does not know if he is still there and only has poste restante to write to. Asks Marsh, if he knows Kitson's address, to drop him a line. Feels that he should 'not be living alone in such an Eden without someone else to share'; would end up praying to God 'as Adam di, for a help meet, and would willingly sacrifice a rib or two' to have a 'sufficiently charming Eve' to talk English to. Hopes Marsh and family are well. Postscript with address: Hotel Scapolatielli, Corpo di Cava, Italia.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St. - Bob's 'old woman' [housekeeper] told him when he returned [from Italy?] that a 'young man in a cab with a portmanteau' called when he was away; seems that Edward 'appeared at no 14 [home of Crompton and Theodore Llewelyn Davies] hunting for a lunch'; hopes he found 'a friend or restaurant in time' as he knows his friend needs 'constant supplies... to stave off dissolution', like moles which cannot go without worms for more than twelve hors. Went round to Bruton Street yesterday, but found that Edward had gone back on Sunday; this means he missed meeting 'a rose of Shiraz, the direct descendant of the one which intoxicated Hafiz... You would have had this rose, had you been here' but instead Bob 'took it round to [Roger] Fry, who fell violently in love with it, and fell to painting it' [this appears to refer to the first meeting between Fry and his future wife Helen Coombe]. Supposes Edward is caught up in 'the last act' of his academical careers [final exams]; he should not be 'despondent and doubtful'. Tells Edward to excuse his 'sermons', but not his spelling, as he swears 'never to look at or correct' a letter to him again, 'after the outrageous fables' Edward circulated about his 'beautiful and chaste letters from Italy'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Hotel Scapolatielli, Corpo di Cava (written on printed notepaper for the Hôtel de Londres, Gênes - crossed out). - Marsh's letter gave Bob much pleasure, since the 'stupid people at Naples' have not yet sent his first on; his address 'hints fascinating suggestions of rustic English scenery, and milk drunk and mild-maids beflirted in dairies'. Asks if Marsh is alone, or whether this letter is '"solus ad solum", as Flaubert used to write to Maxime Ducamp'. Read [William?] Archer's review of the plays produced by the Independent Theatre [Society] in the "Pall Mall Budget", and supposes it was 'in some slight degree inspired by' Marsh's; hopes this 'wonderful pale-faced black-haired [man: Lugné-Poe, see 15/322]' will still be in London when he returns at the end of the month; asks if it was Titian's portrait of Ariosto Marsh was reminded of. Has read Maeterlinck's "Intruse"; did not feel anything strongly for the writer, but would not like to have written the play: did not think the 'poetical or romantic element to which realism was totally sacrificed... was not quite good enough', that Maeterlink was 'not the right man to do it well, but that he could imaging 'a real poet doing something very wonderful in that line'. Glad Oswald [Sickert] 'has seen the last of those Beautiful Englanders' ["Beautiful Britain", published by the Werner Company]; remembers Marsh talking about Sickert's second novel a while ago and thought he had said it was finished, so asks whether this is a third. Asks whether [Stanley] Makower's book is out yet.

Marsh seems 'to have been going the round of our distinguished men pretty thoroughly'; makes Bob 'writhe with envy to read your account; would particularly like to see [Robert] Bridges, and means to make Roger [Fry], Bridges' nephew, take him one day. Has a book of Bridges' verse with him here, which is 'very readable and at times very beautiful'; Fry is 'enthusiastic' about him, and reads Bob passages aloud from "Prometheus [the Firegiver]"; Bob thinks 'a calmness and gentleness of tone and harmony about him... seems to make him a sort of painters poet'; hopes Marsh was 'not badly shown up' for his 'neglect' of Bridges' recent books. A man called [Henry Charles] Beeching lives with Bridges [he in the Rectory at Yattendon, Bridges in the manor house there; Beeching married Bridge's niece] and 'has just published a volume of milky poetry for which Roger has done a frontispiece' ["In a Garden and Other Poems"]; Roger says they quarrel with each other 'off and on in a mild chronic sort of way'. Asks whether Marsh saw Beeching.

Is living an 'ideal sort of life here'; describes his daily routine of exercise, study and meals; he eats omelettes, risotto, 'some wonderful things they call fritelli', for which he gives instructions and states his intention to continue making them in England. His work is 'just as mysterious' to himself as it is to Marsh; does not have the 'faintest idea what it is going to turn out' as; the plot is a 'puzzle' to him, the style is he knows 'vicious and unnatural as a rule' though he hopes it is good sometimes, and the important thing is to get it finished. Has the greatest difficulty finding names for his characters; his hero is called Benedict, 'an awfull name... which mercifully shortens into Bendy'. Badly wants a name for 'a sort of Jim Stephen who has not gone mad' but has achieved nothing due to 'an incorrigible laziness and want of enterprise'; he is in danger of losing his wife to the hero. Bob was just creating a character called Paul who was turning out 'without my intending it, uncommonly like you'; Marsh's letter has made him realise with 'horror' what he was doing and he may have to take Paul out. The character is engaged to a very charming girl who is like someone Bob knows. Hopes to be back in England in about three weeks; intends to 'plunge into an incredible carreer of gluttony [sic] and Pantegruelizing'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

29 Beaufort Str[eet], Chelsea. - Hears that Marsh has done well [in his civil service exams] but not 'what particular function' - colonial, military, or financial, he will choose; hopes he is 'satisfied and happy'. Sorry that Marsh could not come to Wallington, and hopes he has good hunting and fishing in Scotland. Asks what he thinks of the Czar; would like to meet 'a live deer-stalking tyrant'. Has taken Copse Cottage, near Friday's Hill [home of the Pearsall Smiths]; Bertie and Alys [Russell] left for America today, and Logan is soon leaving for Italy, so Bob will be glad of occasional company. Intends to hire a piano for Marsh and [G.E.] Moore; has four bedrooms, three sitting rooms and four sculleries. Tells Marsh to return from Scotland 'not too religious, and... without loosing [sic] your artistic instinct' as he is 'required as a patron and lover of young art to guarantee a guinea of the... fund for Roger [Fry's] exhibition at Cambridge, which will include works by Conder, Ricket[t]s, Shannon, Steer, W[alter] Sickert, Rothenstein, Maccoll, Savage, Houseman and Tonks [emphasised]. Also wants Marsh to get [Desmond] MacCarthy and [? Francis] Balfour, for whom he himself does not have addeses, to contribute; promises to do so should be sent to A[rthur] E[verett] Shipley at Christs [College Cambridge]. Has been writing letters all morning, imagining what he will look like in the new frock-coat which he is having made for the wedding of Roger [Fry] and Helen [Coombe], at which he is to be best man.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Grimsby Farm, Long Lane, Coldash, Newbury. - Since, 'like Alice [in Wonderland]' he always takes 'a great interest in questions of eating and drinking', he is worried that Trevy is under-eating, unless risotto is 'very comprehensive and satisfying', like the dish described [in Aristophanes' "Ecclesiazusae/Assemblywomen" in a long compound word of which he quotes the beginning. Other than that Trevy seems to be having a 'perfect time', much better than he is himself. Wants very much to see Trevy's work; tells him to 'leave Paul as he is' [see 15/274] or just change the name so he will not recognise him; expects the book will be 'uncommon good'. Oswald [Sickert] nearly finished his book at Christmas, but did nothing more between then and Easter, as he was too busy with "Beautiful B[retain": published by the Werner Company]; he says a great deal work needs still to be done on it. [Stanley] Makower's book ["The Mirror of Music"] should be out soon after Easter. The 'great literary event' has been [Arthur] Verrall's "Euripides the Rationalist"; does not think he has ever read 'anything so clever'; will not say anything about it as it would spoil it, and it seems 'perfectly convincing'. Has been 'getting on very well with [Robert] Bridges': went with him to Oxford for a day last week; he seems 'the biggest man I've ever known anything of, perhaps equal with [William Gunion?] Rutherford'; cannot think of anyone else so 'thoroughly serious, thoroughly humorous, and thoroughly consistent', except perhaps Sickert who does not seem to be 'exactly "great" at present', though may be at forty. Bridges is bringing out an edition of Keats soon which will, for example see 'plain "Endymion" as an allegory". They went to the Bodleian, which is 'a delightful place'; Lady Shelley has recently given them 'a fine collection of Shelley MSS etc'. Roger [Fry] is coming to Yattendon soon after Easter, but unfortunately Marsh will have left by then. The 'great thing about Maeterlinck is the sound'; "L'Intruse" was a 'complete failure on the stage'; "Pelléas et Mélisande" 'delightful to listen to'; afraid the 'beautiful M. Lugné Poë' 'is gone for good, and won't come back, the theatre was so dreadfully empty' though the 'decent critics' were all in favour has not seen [William] Archer's articles, but Shaw 'praised the company highly' who has been in Fiesole, will soon go 'for a sail down the Adriatic', and return to England at the end of April. Asks if Trevy has seen the reports of Russell's brother [Frank]'s case; believes it will be settled on Tuesday week; thinks [Russell's wife] 'the Countess and her mother exposed themselves pretty fully'.

Heard from 'dear [Arthur] Shipley this morning, he's in solitary splendour at Cambridge'. Asks if Shipley is Trevy's 'idea of Horace', as he is Marsh's own, both physically and in character. Has also had a 'very gay letter from T. T. [Phelps?], furious' with Trevy for writing twice to Marsh and not to him. Has heard from 'the Seatollerites': George [Trevelyan] and [George] Moore both wrote last Sunday and the party seems to have been a success up to then. Has been 'working very hard' himself, but does not think he is getting on and worries about his Tripos [examinations]; the only reading he is doing apart from revision is de Quincey, of whom he is becoming 'very fond'. Thought the murder Trevy told him about at Wallington, '[William] Winter's murder [i.e., that committed by Winter]' was in "Murder as a Fine Art [de Quincey's "Murder Considered as one of the Fine Arts"]', but read that this morning and there is nothing about it there; asks where Trevy 'got all the details'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

When in town last week, saw Roger [Fry], who advised him to see [Frederick] Porter; Porter seemed 'a very sensible sort of man', and he thinks Julian would like him. Porter thinks Julian should come and visit him at his house in Chiswick when the Cambridge term is over and show him some drawing; he is going to France for a fortnight in July and perhaps Julian could go with him. Likes what he has seen of Porter's painting; he teaches at the Central School of Art[s and Crafts]. Does not think he will come to Cambridge on 8 June, but Bessie probably will. Had quite a good [Lake] Hunt, but left on Monday. The Sangers are visiting.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Went to the L.Gr. [London Group] Show yesterday; thought Julian's pictures 'looked very well'; went with [Hasan] Suhrawardy, who also liked them; saw Roger [Fry] who 'thought the water-colour came off best but was interested in the others too'. A 'great thing' to have got them shown, since the 'hanging committee is quite strict and impartial' and would not have shown them just to please [Frederick] Porter. Liked Porter's 'snow picture', as well as Fry's landscape and [Duncan] Grant's still life. Rehearsals [for Robert's "Meleager"] on Wednesday went quite well; Mrs [Penelope] Wheeler likes [Julian's] idea of painting the shrine on the wing-cloth, which will allow more room for the actors, as well as the tomb on the opposite side. Suhrawardy thinks that a 'vaguely suggested image' on the shrine 'would worry the audience', so it should be assumed to be inside; Robert is not sure whether he is right, but thinks Mrs Wheeler will want the image suggested. Has paid Higson's bill for the canvas. Lists the rehearsal dates; supposes that Julian will be able to get the cloths to Oxford by 4 or 5 November. Will come to Cambridge if he can if Julian wants him to; asks if he could send a sketch of his designs. They seem to be finding some costumes which will meet Julian's 'requirements'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Thanks Julian for his letter; fears he will not be able to come to Cambridge next week, as he has scalded his leg; may be able to visit after Julian's tripos [exams], but does not know has long his term lasts. Expects the Waterfields [Aubrey and Lina] would be at Aulla in September, but that is a long time away. He and Elizabeth seem a little nearer a settlement with Roland [Vaughan Williams] about the house: they are holding out for a thirty five year lease, at least one longer than the twenty one year lease he is offering. Hopes Tom [Sturge Moore?] will not be 'too cantankerous at the Heretics [Society]'. Bessie is still in the Netherlands, and seems to be enjoying herself; C.A. [Clifford Allen] is recovering, but 'very slowly'. Thinks Roger [Fry] is painting a portrait in Cambridge and Julian could see him; tells him to ask Goldie [Dickinson] or at King's.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Furzen Wood. - Originally enclosing 'a review that may interest' which he thinks, on stylistic grounds, is written by Roger [Fry]. Hopes Julian is enjoying the South of France. Bessie seems quite well, and to be enjoying herself in Holland; he himself is not totally well yet, which he has made an excuse for not going to see [Terence Gray's production of his translation of] "Antigone" at Cambridge, though he goes to London to see Donald [Tovey]'s concerts and some of the Russian operas, and is probably doing too much. Negotiations for performance of Tovey's opera ["The Bride of Dionysus", for which Bob wrote the libretto] again next February or March. Doubts if he will go abroad in July, but will probably go to the Lakes with the C.A.s [Clifford Allens] for a while, and must go to see Tovey at Hedenham to get him to 'correct his programme proofs at last'; Bessie could come later if Julian is coming over just then.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan, with draft of "Comano", a poem

Poggio allo Spino, Consuma (Prov. di Firenze). - Elizabeth sent Julian's letter giving Belgrade p[oste] r[estante] as an address, so hopes this will be forwarded. Glad Julian has had so good a time; expects he will be in Greece by now. Is at B.B. [Bernard Berenson]'s; [Raffaello] Piccoli is here at the moment talking to Berenson about Sir Thomas Browne, whom he has been translating. He is evidently still 'far from well', but seems better today; if Julian is passing through Naples on his rerun from Greece Piccoli hopes he will visit him there. The Waterfields [Aubrey, Lina and their children] are also hoping Julian will come to Poggio [Gherardo] on his way back; he himself spent 'a very pleasant week in camp with them', doing some work on [his translation of] Lucretius and his own writing; they were all very nice, though Aubrey 'as usual was often very cross, chiefly with Lina, who always takes it very nicely'. Everyone seemed to have enjoyed Julian's visit, and he 'had become more or less legendary': Bob was for instance taken to see the rock which Julian 'had split by painting it', and Aubrey had done a sketch of the incident. Cecil [Anrep], who is 'very nice, and knows English much better' is here for a few days. Bob is travelling to Paris on Tuesday, will spend two nights with [Hasan] Suhrawardy and [Maria] Germanova, then go to London on Friday and the Shiffolds on Saturday. [Aleksandr] Kalitinski and Germanova, and he supposes Rex [the dog], will probably go to Prague for the winter; S[uhrawardy] is going to India after spending a few days in England. Kalitinski seemed much better when Bob was in Paris a month ago; while there Bob went to the Colonial Exhibition and saw the Bali Ballet. B.B. and Nicky [Mariano] would be glad to se Julian if he comes to Poggio. Roger [Fry] seems to have been at Florence and to have 'got on quite well with B.B.'.

Everyone hopes Julian will be 'very careful about the dogs' if he goes walking in Greece; he [and his friend Ralph Parker] 'should both have big sticks, as long as possible'; B.B. is sure that 'the young man who was lost on Parnassus' was killed by dogs, though Bob thinks it more likely he fell down a precipice. B.B. thinks Mistra [Mystras] is 'much more interesting' as regards art than Athos, though he has not been to the latter; he is 'very much irritated against Biron [Robert Byron]', who is now writing for the "Statesman", and says he 'talks great nonsense about art'; still, 'one might get a good deal from his book ["The Station, Athos"]'.

Wonders whether Julian will come to England before settling at Paris again; he should find the Shiffolds 'more or less in order'. Does not understand the 'political upset in England', and is reserving judgment until he can see C[lifford] A[llen] and others; T.M. [? ie Thomas Sturge Moore?] writes that Allen is also reserving judgement until the facts, which are 'very complicated', are clearer; Bob however thinks it a 'bad business', and that the Labour movement is 'smashed up for some time'; this is not a 'National Government', but a 'Tory-Liberal Coalition, which may, or may not, have been necessary to save the pound from collapsing'. Hopes Allen will not 'take it too tragically'. Encloses a 'poem in Po Chu I's manner', "Comano" which refers to a wonderful view he, Aubrey and Lina discovered one day; dated Aug 1931.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Very glad Julian has been able to get the tax reduced [see 15/85-86]; thanks him for returning the cheque. If Julian ever finds himself in any difficulties, hopes he will always let him know; would much prefer to help him than for him to have 'money worries and debts', especially as he knows Julian is 'quite sensible and economical'. A pity he will have to give up his studio. but expects he can get something not too bad much cheaper. Part of Roger [Fry]'s inaugural lecture for the Slade Professorship appears in the "Times" today; will send it though it is 'too mutilated to be very interesting'. There are 'goodish reviews' of [George] Reavey's Russian translations "Soviet Literature: An Anthology" in the "Times [Literary] Supplement" and "Man[chester] Guardian"; has the book but has not yet read it; it seems well done. Will probably not go abroad until January, though his plans are not yet definite. The Geoffrey Youngs are coming for the weekend. Bessie is quite well, and so is C[lifford] A[llen] at present.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Hodgkin

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Expects he will be at Wallington on 12 [April]; Edward could come then, or earlier in the week; there will be a 'mob of people' he hardly knows such as the Spence Watsons early on but 'the coast will be cleared' after Tuesday; he will get there on Wednesday or Thursday next week. Asks Edward to send Kitty's address [Kitson added in pencil]; they could 'do something to rag him' such as sending a letter 'enclosing a beautiful epithalamium'. 'Here is a fan for Roger [Fry] to paint, which 'may be used to support whichever side of the temperance question you may choose'; includes the text of Bob's poem "For a Fan", with a reference to the Homeric Hymn to Pan.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - They [he and his wife] were 'quite overcome' by Bob's news [the death of the Trevelyans' son Paul]; having children themselves, they know how 'terrible' it will be for them both, though also 'how bravely Bessie will bear it' and help Bob to do some. Tells Bob he can come almost any day next week; hopes Helen will get over to see Bessie.

Letter from Hamilton Easter Field to R. C. Trevelyan

106 Columbia H[eigh]ts, Brooklyn. - Sends congratulations to the Trevelyans on the birth of their son [Paul], and hopes he will see 'all three ere long'. All going well with them; saw 'quite a little of Roger [Fry] when he was here'; regrets Roger thinks 'six weeks all too long to devote to us poor American mortals'. [George] Santayana dined here recently, with an introduction from Roger; he reminds Field 'of B.B. [Bernard Berenson] in more ways than one', but he thinks he has a 'less lovable nature'. Santayana is lecturing on aesthetics in Brooklyn to 'a small but appreciative audience'. Thanks Trevelyan for his card to his mother; Paul is a good name, as is Trevelyan, which goes well with it.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Hodgkin

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Will try to stop his letter 'lapsing into a scrawl at the end'. Glad that Edward and his sister are having such a good time at Rome; would like to be there himself very much, and may get there by the end of the year but fears Edward will be gone by then. Asks if Edward could disappear for a few months and 'be in hiding at Rome'; since he 'has no large sums from the Bank', his 'action could not be given a criminal interpretation'; tells him to hide in the painted tombs on the via Latina - or at least go and see them, and 'the robins hopping about among the cut roses'. Gives other sightseeing advice; tells Edward he should arrange with a dairy to have 'Devonshire cream, i.e. crema dura, every morning for breakfast'. He should also go to see the Pinturicchio in 'the Church on the Capitol' of the Magdaline [sic] 'walking about in the desert scantily clad reading a prayer book'; he himself 'must write a fan on her'. Is currently writing 'a play about Mantua and Greek Emperors and Gonzagaz, and Vittorino dei Feltre, and Vittor [?] Pisano, and charming and learned young ladies who won't marry the people their fathers tell them to' ["Cecilia Gonzaga"]; is also translating Ovid's "Metamorphoses", and writes out an extract from his version of the Daphne and Apollo episode. Plans to translate 'a few things from him and Propertius and Ronsard etc', and hopes Roger [Fry] will illustrate them if he has time. Verse beginning 'Knowst thou why Ovidius Naso / Mourned and sorrowed all his days so': because he knew who would illustrate and translate his work. Has never been to the Villa d'Este himself, but has heard much about it from the Frys; Roger has painted a 'very nice picture' of it, and said there were 'rose-wreathed cypresses' there which Bob has put into his poem "Juno's Peacock". Saw G.V. [Gilbert Venables?] recently, also saw Ronnie Norman at a concert, who 'seemed all right'. Asks Edward to let him know when he is returning, so they can meet in London; will answer his sister's letter soon.

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