Showing 2564 results

Archival description
Trevelyan, Elizabeth (1875-1957) musician, known as Bessie
Print preview View:

1 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Letter from G. E. Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

86 Chesterton Road, Cambridge. - He and Dorothy were very sorry to hear of Molly MacCarthy's death: they had found her charming when she stayed with them for two days in July. She wrote to them that she was very ill and did not really wish to live, but they did not hear the news until Michael MacCarthy came to tell them about the funeral as they take the "Manchester Guardian", which did not report it, not the "Times". She made the decisions about Desmond's grave when she came, and composed the inscription; the Moores saw the tomb when it was finished and wrote to tell Molly it was just as she wished. Molly's hearing seemed much better on her visit: Moore supposes she had a better hearing aid. Michael brought his wife and daughter: the little girl seemed very attractive; he and Dorothy were struck by how like his father Michael was. Mary Fletcher had written to let him know she was relieved she did not need to have any operations or other hospital treatment; was glad to hear from Bessie that she was a little better now. Is sorry that he forgot the date of her birthday so was unable to reciprocate for the eightieth birthday telegram she sent him. Has read Virginia Woolf's diary: does not quite agree that she was more affected by bad reviews that she should have been, in fact had rather the opposite impression. Never saw much of her but 'always admired her greatly' and the diary left him 'admiring her as much as ever'. Neither he and Dorothy were able to make much of "To the Lighthouse" and "The Waves", but the library made him think he should try again. Enjoyed the "Common Reader" very much.

Letter from Ralph Vaughan Williams to Elizabeth Trevelyan

10, Hanover Terrace, Regent's Park, London, N.W.1. - Good to hear from Bessie; they hope they will see Bessie here at their new house; they love it and 'Ursula has made it beautiful'. Is sending a copy of one of his arrangements of "Greensleeves", from which he thinks Philip Erasmus can 'pick out the tune'; confesses it is a '"cento". There are several versions of the tune, and [he] took the best bits' from each', but feels he is 'quite justified'.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Thanks for the letter and the anthology of Bob's poetry. A pity that Desmond [MacCarthy] did not live to write about Bob. Has Forster's and Virginia Woolf's last books but has not yet read them: the number of periodicals he must read leaves little time for books. Nicky reads them to him but it is slow going; the current book is Iris Origo's biography of Leopardi. Julian must come and visit next time he is in Italy.

Letter from Charles Humphry Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Gazeley. Trumpington, Cambridge. - Sorry to have taken so long to answer Bessie's letters, but is 'snowed under with scholarship examining'. No reviews [of R. C. Trevelyan's "Selected Poems" yet as far as he knows. Encloses two letters he has had from Ralph Wedgwood and the Provost [of King's College Cambridge, Sir John Sheppard] which he would like back eventually. Hopes to hear from [James] MacGibbon this week how the book has been selling.

Letter from Charles Humphry Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Gazeley. Trumpington, Cambridge. - Would have been good to have the publishers listed with the titles [of R. C. Trevelyan's books in the forthcoming "Selected Poems", but is afraid he did not think of it.; sure Bessie need not worry about having her two copies charged to the royalties account; next time, as she says, she can get them through a bookseller. His family are all well, as is his mother.

Letter from B. S. Rees to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Milford House, Loughor, Swansea. - Thanks Mrs Trevelyan for sending the book [the posthumous "Selected Poems" of R. C. Trevelyan]; finds it 'charming', as is 'disillusioned & at times embittered by this so-called modern verse'; never met Mrs Trevelyan's husband but feels he knows him 'as well if not better than many who shook him by the hand', having 'gone part of his way' himself. Loves his work with young people who have given him a 'glimpse of a face of the truth', and their 'spontaneity' brings them joy; thought can be a 'terrible brake on the spirit'. Good to know that she is keeping well and interested in affairs; 'lack[s] companionship' here and often wishes he could 'drop in' on the Shiffolds for a chat.. The school is 'flourishing', and seems to have touched people's imagination; ordinary people who believe in it 'intensely' and are willing to make sacrifices for it; thinks only schools can 'save our civilisation - & only the right men in them'; fears the 'authorities' will not realise this. Enjoyed his stay in Austria and what he saw of Bavaria and Venice; hopes to go to Italy [see also perhaps 1/45] in the spring, since they have a new car and both his nephews drive; with the 'increased travel allowance. Hopes to be in London in January and will call from his hotel

Letter from Edith Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - The day she and Bertie spent at the Shiffolds was 'quite perfect'; apologises for not writing sooner to say so. Hopes to see Bessie in town, but much looks forward to 'the promised repeat expedition' when the days are warmer and longer again. Is most grateful to Bessie for welcoming her so warmly. Asks to be remembered to Miss Jones, who did much to make them happy, and 'the other ladies' as well if they are still there.

Letter from Bertrand Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter about his broadcast on his Cambridge friends ["Portraits from Memory"]; is extremely glad she liked what he said about Bob and to have recalled his exclamation about his library [asked if he would destroy the world if he could, Bob exclaimed "What? Destroy my library?"] Is sorry she is having domestic troubles, and would be pleased to visit again for the day when she is over her 'bad patch'.

Letter from Ralph Vaughan Williams to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The White Gates, Dorking. - Very 'dear' of Bessie to write 'such an affectionate letter'. Is still in Dorking, as 'Ursula will not have [him] in London till all is ready!' The removal men will take him 'and the rest of the moveables on Tuesday!' They have not had an invitation to Birkbeck yet [in connection of the presentation of Robert Trevelyan's books to the library?], and hopes they will get one.

Letter from Bertrand Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Is very sorry to hear about Elizabeth's 'domestic troubles': it must be very trying to be so dependent on others. He himself is completely well. Has just met Humphrey Trevelyan, but neither he nor Edith know his wife. The Russells would like to come to the Shiffolds for the day, when this would suit Elizabeth.

Letter from Pau Casals to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Prades. - He understands the joy she takes in her nephew's company: Joachim is 'un garcon et un artiste de premiere ordre', and strongly resembles his father. His feeling for the [Prades] Festival, and his collaboration, are very important to Casals. Is happy about the arrangement for Robert Trevelyan's library [at Birkbeck College, London], it is just the right tribute to his memory. His compatriot Corredor is preparing a book of conversations with him: Röntgen, Tovey and Moór will figure as both great musicians and friends. Thinks Corredor will strike the right note. He is in the middle of preparations for the festival; many of the musicians have already arrives. Knows she would enjoy the music and the atmosphere.

Letter from Pau Casals to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Prades. - The arrangement she has made for her husband's library seems a good one; he, like she, is sure that Robert Trevelyan would approve. He thinks often of Robert and of their friend Donald Tovey. Is sorry to hear of Joachim's rheumatic pains and hope they have ceased; soon he will receive an invitation for the [Prades] Festival and it would give Casales joy to work with him as in other years.

Announcement of the forthcoming marriage of Ralph Vaughan Williams and Ursula Wood

Ursula Wood, 57 Gordon Mansions, Torrington Place, WC1; Ralph Vaughan Williams, The White Gates, Dorking, Surrey. - Thinks recipients 'will not be surprised to hear' that they have decided to marry soon [on 7 Feb, 1953]; their addresses will stay as above until they find a 'suitable house'. Asks for their 'blessing'.

Letter from G. E. Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

86 Chesterton Road, Cambridge. - Apologises for not replying sooner 'time does seem to go so quickly now!'. Glad to hear the news about [Bob Trevelyan's] library, and that she has found the librarian so amiable. Also good to hear about [George?] Birkbeck, of whom he knew nothing. Bad luck that both of her readers had laryngitis; does not know how he would get on if he could not read a great deal. Also sorry that Mary Fletcher could not come to visit because of her brother's illness. He is keeping well, though he cannot do many things he once could he is still 'as capable as ever of having good talks on philosophy'. Dorothy is also keeping well, though says she is starting to feel old. Encloses a letter from Bob to Desmond [MacCarthy], which Molly sent in a 'sheaf' of his letters to Desmond.

Letter from Bertrand Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

41 Queen's Road, Richmond, Surrey. - Thanks Elizabeth for her kind letter: is glad she thinks him 'neither foolish nor rash' [to be marrying again]. Would be a pleasure to bring Edith to the Shiffolds and will try to do so soon; would like to do it before the library goes [the donation of R. C. Trevelyan's books to Birkbeck College, London took place in 1954]. Is good of Elizabeth to make the gift, but she must mind.

Letter from Ralph Vaughan Williams to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The White Gates, Westcott Road, Dorking, Surrey. - Very glad that 'things are progressing with regards to the books' [the purchase of Robert Trevelyan's books by London University, for which Vaughan Williams had started a subscription list]. Sorry he could not hear the Röntgen Quartet, but could not get to London that night. Explains that the "Sinfonia Antarctica" [original spelling] gets its name as it is derived from something he wrote for the film "Scott of the Antarctic".

Letter from Humphry Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Gazeley, Trumpington. - Good that they can go ahead with the selection [of poems]; the drawing and Max [Beerbohm]'s letter are a 'great addition'. Not likely now that they will be able to get the book published for Christmas, but they will see what MacGibbon says [R.C. Trevelyan, "Selected Poems", with a drawing and introductory letter by Max Beerbohm, was published by MacGibbon & Kee in 1953]. It is the October 1941 number of the "Abinger Chronicle" which has the drawing in; will send it back as soon as possible. They are all well and busy; Molly sends much love.

Letter from Ralph Vaughan Williams to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The White Gates, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bessy for letting him know about the Röntgen [Quartet] concert. Humphrey Searle is 'one of the "Wrong note" young men' whose music Vaughan Williams does not understand, but is 'well thought of by many people'. Asked Miss Cullen [secretary of the Leith Hill Music Festival] about tickets for the 11th, very sorry that there are none left.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Desmond [MacCarthy]'s death is a 'terrible loss to his friends', and to the 'reading public whom he advised so well'; it is much to be regretted that he cannot now 'write that Introduction to the selection of Bob's work'; fears only he could have written it 'to perfection'. Took George Moore and his wife to Desmond's private funeral here; Ralph and Iris [Wedgwood] also came as well as his relations. Only person he is not sorry for is 'Desmond himself'; 'not much privilege' for the old to 'drag on in the present age' and he suffered so much from the asthma 'he endured so bravely'. Janet is much the same, but cannot get about; he leaves her as little as possible. Thanks Bessie for the offer of a book from Bob's library; he does not have a particular one he would like so she should choose one for him.

Letter from G. E. Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

86 Chesterton Road, Cambridge. - Is sorry that he did not see Desmond [MacCarthy] at all when he came to receive his honorary degree: George Trevy [Trevelyan], with whom Desmond was staying, let him know that he needed to rest after the ceremony and then he was too ill to visit Moore. He and Dorothy went to Desmond's funeral in Cambridge, in George Trevy's car. Is hoping he will be well enough to come to Leith Hill Place this summer, and to see Bessie then. Was glad to hear from Mary Fletcher that Bessie has a satisfactory couple as gardener and cook.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Garricks Villa. - Thanks Bessie for lending him his letters to Bob, which help him to remember many things; her reading 'the shaving book' came back to him: he must have heard fragments of several books, including a chapter of "Robinson Crusoe". Has so far only looked at the letters in the canvas envelope, not the ones in the big box; was not sure how long he was going to stay at Leith Hill Place or he would have saved her the bother of posting them. Will return the letters when they next meet, he hopes in early July, unless she would like them sooner. He and Molly are going to stay with Dermod tomorrow, then go to Cambridge for him to receive an honorary degree on 5th June. Thinks how much more Bob deserved the honour: MacCarthy persuaded Roberts, then Vice Chancellor, to put Bob's name before the Senate in 1950 and he was nearly chosen. Would not be surprised if his own degree was to make up for his disappointment then. Enjoyed their talk very much: of course she can keep some books [from Bob's library], but it would be then nice to leave them to the Birkbeck library; she should not be disappointed if they do not raise the full £600.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Glad to hear that Bessie's health is improved and she can now concentrate on finding a home for Bob's books. Fears he will only be able to spare £20, but hopes that sufficient contributions will be found. E. M. Forster visited recently, and he talked very fondly of Bob and the Shiffolds, as does Sylvia Sprigge. Morra is always on the move; Berenson does not think he has been in London lately and he would certainly visit Bessie if he could.

Results 61 to 90 of 2564