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Trevelyan, Elizabeth (1875-1957) musician, known as Bessie
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will be glad to welcome Elizabeth and Robert on 13 August; they will see Aunt Annie [Philips], who comes on the 9th. Glad they will be there for the 'festivities'; there will be the Exhibition, the servants' party, and a garden party for the neighbours to introduce Mary, who must 'make dignified little bows, and not jump onto the arms of chairs!'; she is 'great fun', and Elizabeth will like her when she knows her. Interested to hear of Miss [Laetitia] Ede, who is sure to get on since she has 'real energy'. Sir George knows nothing about Gregorian chants; he liked the 'florid music at the Oratory' and is sorry it has stopped. Asks if she should find someone to accompany Elizabeth on her visit; Mr [Charles?] Orde of Nunnykirk gave Caroline a name, which she encloses; it will be a problem what to do with her in the evening 'if she is not a lady' so she may ask her to come for the day to see what she is like. Cannot put Elizabeth up at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] on the 4th, as Maria [Springett] is taking her holiday and has put everything away; hopes it will not be inconvenient to go to a club or a hotel; believes the Great Northern Hotel is comfortable and would be convenient [this section of the letter crossed out] but Elizabeth is travelling by Euston. Hopes the weather is drier by Monday, when a group of hospital nurses are coming. Asks whether Mrs Salmonson [sic: Jeanne Salomonson Asser] will return to Holland when Elizabeth leaves Rottingdean.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Dr [Karl] Bluth has telephoned to say he has been to see Ursula, and 'all is going as well as can be expected'. They are very relieved; thinks Bessie is writing to Ursula. Is afraid it has been a 'very worrying time', but hopes this will 'get rid of the trouble for good and all'. Bessie has not been well today, but Bob thinks it is 'nothing much'. Alice [Elms?]'s operation seems to have been successful.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Asks Bessie if she can send back an enclosure; despairs as to how they can get D.F.T. [Donald Tovey] to get the symphony ready in time [for its British premiere]. Is now going to Edinburgh for a week, after an attack of influenza; Kate [Friskin] is playing the Schumann allegro and Beethoven G major concerto, with Donald conducting, on the 20th. The critic at the Hague is 'delightful'; is astonished any newspaperman could understand Donald so well; asks Bessie to translate it exactly for her. Her 'world is full of Belgians - two more, convalescent officers, arrived today'. Madame de Beughen will be in charge of them till she returns.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Very sorry to hear her aunt is no better; wishes her uncle would get a nurse; agrees that Bessie should not go to England yet and will therefore stay longer in Ravello; if her aunt is no better by the time he reaches the Hague he will stay only a few days and could come back later.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

22 Sussex Villas, W. - Has written to Mrs Grammont [sic: Bramine Hubrecht] 'about her young Russian'. Tells Bessie to make sure Bob writes the article on [Thomas Sturge] Moore as soon as he gets home. Will be away from the middle of March to the middle of May, so Bob must communicate directly with [Edward] Jenks about the article, unless [Nathaniel] Wedd or [Goldie Lowes] Dickinson return from their Easter holiday in time to take it. Glad they have got 'such a jolly place'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that they found Caroline 'a great comfort and pleasure'; is not 'anxious' but 'much interested' about Elizabeth [due to give birth]. Interested by what Robert says about [Aeschylus's] "Eumenides", which he thinks the best Greek tragedy he has read. Hopes the newspaper reports of the discovery of a substantial fragment of Menander are true. Discusses his recent reading of Lucian, whom Macaulay quotes in his essay on Madame D'Arblay.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Cambo, Morpeth. - Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s funeral went 'very well today'; the weather allowed 'long views of the moors and hills she loved'. The cortège went from Wallington to Cambo, and she was buried in the churchyard 'almost next to' their grandfather [Sir Charles Edward Trevelyan]. Asks Bob to tell Bessie that 'Mary has developed one of her enthusiasms for William III and Holland', since she is studying 1688 as a 'special period' [at university], and has tried to learn some Dutch. They are going to the Netherlands at Easter partly because of this; should meet and discuss before then.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Originally enclosing three publicity notices for the "Abinger Chronicle" for Julian and Ursula to distribute to possible subscribers, such as Imogen [Gore-Browne?]; they should avoid people likely to be on Oliver [Lodge], Bob, [E.M.] Forster or Sylvia [Sprigge]'s lists. Max [Beerbohm] and Forster are both contributing to the Christmas number; does not think he himself will have anything ready. Bessie has a persistent cold, but he hopes she will soon get away to Hove for a few days. Hopes that Diana [Brinton-Lee?]'s 'expedition' was successful. Is trying to write an 'epistle in Alexandrines' to B.B. [Bernard Berenson], but it is 'rather uphill work'; quotes Pope ["Essay on Criticism"]. Tom S[turge] M[oore] is 'fairly all right', though Marie is still in Paris.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry for late letters: the posts are 'much disorganised'; has sent a telegram by the nurse who is taking Julian out in the pony cart; gives news of the child. Glad the R[ussell] Reas are friendly; sure they will be pleasant neighbours. Sir George is well again, and has been round with her 'to give presents & talk to the people', who all seemed to be enjoying Christmas.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Flora Russell

Has already sent Flora Santayana's "Last of the Puritans" [sic; "The Last Puritan]; she need not rush to return it, and he will be interested to hear what she thinks; wonders if she will also read the life of Tennyson, which he and Bessie have read 'with great interest'. as well as a life of Sara Bernhardt by her grand-daughter [Lysiane Bernhardt], which they found 'great fun'. Used to 'delight in' Henry Sidgwick's life; Sidgwick was 'very kind' to him when he was an undergraduate. Must get Joan Allen to drive him over to see Flora soon. Will send a translation of a Homeric hymn as a Christmas card to her in a few days. Bessie is well, and sends her love. Saw Bertie [Russell] last week; he was 'very cheerful and full of talk, but looking rather older'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Sets out his revised plans due to Bessie's aunt's continued illness again; 'very sad for her to be ill during the last few months [Bessie] will be with her', though the marriage could be put off if necessary. Even if the physical side of his feelings for her were not there, believes he would want to have her as a constant companion, which he cannot say even for 'his dearest friends such as Sanger and Fry and [Thomas Sturge] Moore'. Perhaps he should not separate these two aspects of his feelings; consideration of the way her personality seems to be 'always changing' slightly. Cuts off these 'lover's speculations', saying he should return to Mr Mudge [?]. Thinks that Mrs [Mary] Costelloe will not be back when he stays with [Bernard] Berenson, though he could not change his plans now, and does not want to have a breach with her. Has not done well with his play recently, but 'modified the plot somewhat' yesterday and thinks he will get on better now; will be able to read up on medieval manners and costumes on his return to England. Expects he will have to go to Welcombe even if Bessie does not come, and there is 'a fine French book on Medieval customs in the library'. Glad she was pleased by the beetle he sent her; likes 'little everything' as an endearment; knows the feeling that a dream is still real after waking. Hopes they have a nurse for her aunt now. Copies out his translation of the Swallow Song of Rhodes; it is not quite right yet and he needs a dictionary to check some of the words.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

S.S. City of Birmingham at Suez Canal. - They are going through the Great Bitter Lake, and will be at Suez this afternoon; it is not, but 'not unpleasant in the shade'. They reached Port Said yesterday afternoon and left about ten at night. They are now about to wait until the tide changes before continuing. The desert view is 'fine'; they have seen some dromedaries carrying sand from the canal banks; 'the natives look very fine' and sometimes work 'quite naked'. Though everyone 'abuses Port Said', he found it 'fascinating'. [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson joined them there. Hears from Bessie that there was no report of their ship passing Gibraltar; the report had not reached Naples either. Notes at 2 pm that they are not tied up due to being 'stuck on the sand', as they were first told, but to allow other boats to pass; supposes they will start again soon. Will not write again till Bombay. Their plans are still vague, but they will probably go north to Lahore before returning later to Rajputana. The news from Turkey sounds bad [beginning of the First Balkan War]; if there is war, hopes it will 'end in the Turks leaving Europe for good and all'; will be interesting to get newspapers at Bombay. Glad to hear that everyone is well at Walllington; Bessie sounds cheerful, hopes she did not get anxious about not hearing the ship was past Gibraltar. Notes in a postscript at 2.15 pm that they are just about to start again.

Letter from William Rothenstein to R. C. Trevelyan

Iles Farm, Far Oakridge. - Liked Trevelyan's satire very much; 'Only a magnanimous spirit could have conceived the end', and it is a 'splendid retort to the hang-the-Kaiser school'. Glad to hear they may be seeing Trevelyan and his wife, who should not hesitate to invite themselves if they are at Stratford. Trevelyan should not think Rothenstein 'underestimate[s] the difficulty' of 'improving artistic conditions'; can only 'plead as convincingly as [he] can for some intelligent use of the younger people. The more decent artists & poets, the more decent men there are likely to be in the world'. Wishes to counter the misplaced emphasis on '"appreciation"'; does not think it matters 'whether a man cares for Byzantine reliquaries or Greek pots', but that he 'should be moved to try to make something himself. Then he is unlikely to be bloodthirsty' and likely to be 'neighbourly'. [John] Drinkwater, who has a cottage nearby, likes Trevelyan's play as much as he does.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Elizabeth's letter arrived by the evening post yesterday, as always. They are having a heatwave; sorry it was not better weather for Elizabeth's visit. Pleased to hear about the good beginning on [Elizabeth and Robert's new] house; tells her to be careful of the long walk there; she and Sir George went to Greenleighton yesterday with Booa [Mary Prestwich] and Cooper, taking tea, and she felt quite worn out. Has had a nice letter from Paul Hubrecht, who seems to have much enjoyed Northumberland and writes 'wonderfully good English'; criticises the British lack of facility with other languages. Originally enclosing a letter from Audrey [Trevelyan?] and one from 'young [Henry Graham?] Dakyns'; asks whether he is married. Sorry Miss [Lily] Noble's invitation came too late, and hopes Elizabeth can go another time; thanks her for sending it. A lady who called yesterday said there were good stone seats and garden ornaments at the Italian Exhibition in London; it closes on 1 October and the visitor was planning to get some right at the end when they would be sold off cheaply. Thought Elizabeth might like to see them, and she could let Caroline know if anything might suit them. Glad the Enticknaps are well. Hopes Elizabeth will find someone to go with her this winter; would be happier if she had a companion 'during R[obert]'s wanderings'; supposes Meg Booth would not do; Caroline does not know her well but she is 'quieter than Imogen'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Will send back some of Robert's books: the Chaucer; Conrad's "Lord Jim", which Sir George has read before; and Belloc's book, which Caroline 'can manage better' than Sir George. Arthur Sidgwick, who is 'very well and cheerful', and his wife are here; there has been much toboganning down the hills behind the house by 'all the very large pleasure society of Stratford', though now snow and Stratfordians are gone. Delighted to have news of Elizabeth and the baby [Paul]; Aunt Annie [Philips] is very pleased at the news; she is at Palermo and has been to Segesta, which was a hard journey of eleven hours.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

c/o D.F. Tovey Esq, 28 Rutland St, Edinburgh. - If Bessie could put an enclosure into 'decent English' it would 'be doing Donald [Tovey] a kindness'; she herself and Madame de Beughem have tried, but she gave up at the 'charming description of the Azzopardi Studies'. Asks Bessie to publicise the Beethoven recitals. It is 'cold and wet and inexpressibly dirty' here but painfully familiar; she seems to see her 'parents and their children treading the well known streets again'. Very pleased with Donald's 'surroundings' and confident that Mrs Fry is looking after him; his music room, office and classrooms at the university are 'most dignified and beautiful'. Feels 'it is a Godsend' he came here 'just at this fearful time'; she constantly thinks about Fritz Busch and is sure Donald does even more so. Wishes Donald had showed her Grete [Busch]'s letter but 'nothing past can alter the present anxiety - and that must just be borne'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Is very happy to hear Trevelyan might be coming; hopes he will be home as he has no important engagements in Rome in summer or early autumn; he could also come to Vallombrosa. His account will be at Trevelyan's disposal for the books, as long as Trevelyan gives a fortnight's notice of his or his friends' arrival. Recommends a few pensions in Florence, but knows little about Rome, and suggests asking Sylvia [Sprigge]. Hopes Julian is recovering, and that Trevelyan's 'domestic troubles may be resolved'; sends love to Bessie. Had a 'charming and most flattering letter' from Trevelyan's brother about his translation [G. M. Trevelyan, "English Social History"].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to hear that Julian is settled in his own nursery again; sure he remembers it 'as he notices so much'. Very glad that nurse [Mrs Catt] is really better, and hopes all will go well now. She and Sir George are settling down at Welcombe; they are alone till George and Janet come on Wednesday. Sir George says Elizabeth 'must not mind about paying'. Sends love to Bob, and says she 'will read the Medici letters [edited by Janet Ross] with much interest'. She and Sir George did not like the Post impressionists [the exhibition organised by Roger Fry at the Grafton Galleries] which 'leave the impression of a bad, & rather nasty dream, though [she] can see how clever some of it is'.

Letter from Ruth Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Thorpeness, Suffolk. - Robert's poems ["From the Shiffolds"] were a 'delightful surprise': it is a great 'comfort... to turn away from the utterly beastly war to poetry, or music or the like'. The world is 'nearly intolerable' and the war 'seems quite interminable'; hopes it has not treated Robert 'too cruelly' and that he has not had too many doodlebugs. They [she and her friend Lady Dorothea Gibb] were 'on their route for many nights', and the guns against them 'made a devil of a row', but it has been more peaceful recently; she sees however that the death toll from the doodlebugs was 'dreadfully high' last month. Is glad Roger [her brother] is not here to 'endure it'. 'Poor Holland must be suffering terribly': expects the Trevelyans are 'longing for news', as she is herself of 'one dear friend there'. Sends some of her 'own products', though quite different to Robert's; he need not read or acknowledge them. Her anthology, "Ruth's Gleanings", is 'obstinately out of print like most books'. Hopes next year will bring 'a happier world in every sort of way'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Ajanta. - Describes their 'strenuous' time since leaving Bombay on 25 October, though they are 'none the worse for it': they went to Daulatabad then Ellora, where they saw a number of cave-temples; the situation was 'very impressive' though in general the sculpture was 'disappointing'; they also visited ruins of two ancient Moghul cities. In one, Roza [Rauzaa, now Khuldabad], they saw the 'plain and simple' tomb of Aurangzeb. Went by rail to Jalgaon on 28 October, then drove to Ajanta next day; they are staying in a small bungalow to which they had to bring their own provisions and bedding. The caves, four miles away, are in a 'most romantic gorge', and are 'far finer than those at Ellora and Elephanta'; the art would 'hold its own with the best Italian frescos'. They bathed in a 'wonderful' pool at the top of the gorge. Will start at midday on the drive back to Jalgaon, where they will catch the express train to Lahore; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson will stay there with a friend, and Robert with his old schoolmate Stowe, who is in the Indian Civil Service. After a week there and in Peshawar, they will go on to Delhi, then on to Rajputana. They made friends on the ship with a young officer stationed at Peshawar [Kenneth Searight] who will take them for a drive up the Khyber Pass.

So far, they have kept well and borne the heat easily. Heard from Bessie as they were leaving Bombay, and was glad that she, Julian, and everyone else at Wallington were well; expects she will now have gone South. Hopes his father's 'expedition to Stratford was a success'. Caught up with the English newspapers at Bombay and has seen Indian newspapers since; seems that Turkey is 'faring badly' [in the First Balkan War]; is 'not sorry, and hope[s] if the allies will they will be allowed to make whatever settlement of European Turkey they think best without interference from outside'. Did not sympathise with the Italians in their 'Tripoli adventure' [Italo-Turkish War] but does with the Balkan States. They have seen no snakes, tigers, or elephants, but saw three gazelles a couple of evenings ago, and have seen the 'tracks of a pantha' in the Ajanta gorge. Have enjoyed themselves so far, but he will be glad to get 'back to civilisation' at Lahore. Their Madras servant seems 'good and conscientious'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Begins the letter 'Dear as a daughter', which she says was used by 'an old Medici lady' in the book Robert has lent her ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence", by Janet Ross], which she finds interesting but has not yet finished. Annie [Philips] is here and seems well. Is more or less recovered from her 'little feverish attack'. Glad to have good news of Julian. Asks if Elizabeth can send back 'the Shetland scarf' if she is not using it, as it 'does not look as "invalidy" as a shawl'; glad she is better. The 'A.S's' [Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick], Janet and George 'amalgamated well'. Asks if Elizabeth's maids have recovered, and hopes the nurse [Mrs Catt] is sleeping better. Miss Richardson is here and is going with TitBits [the horse] 'to see sights accompanied by Annie's maid'. Sir George was very pleased to get Robert's letter; he has had a correspondence 'with "the master" [of Trinity, Cambridge, Montagu Butler?] on classical things'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Intended to send a small book of his "Translations from Leopardi", but then decided to wait until Julian and Ursula next come here, as they 'might easily lose it moving about'. Pity they cannot come now, when the flowers in the woods are at their best. All quite well here; the [Sturge] Moores will return in a month. Originally enclosing, on Bessie's request, a photograph of 'the street in Forest Green that [Julian] used to admire'. The Bluths and Tet Htoot were here at Easter, but otherwise they 'seem to see nobody'. Hopes that Tet Htoot will bring two Chinese friends to visit. A 'bad London raid last night'; hopes he and the Bluths are all right; Irene [Cooper Willis?] has fortunately been away. Has very few friends in London now besides these, Logan [Pearsall Smith] and Alys [Russell]. Virginia [Woolf]'s death 'a great blow'; she 'felt she was going out of her mind again and could not face it'. Is re-reading "To the Lighthouse", his favourite of her books; is writing something on her for the "Abinger Chronicle", but it is 'impossible to say anything adequate in the way of criticism'. Forgets whether Julian knew her. Is continuing to translate Montaigne and getting 'a little bored with it'; 'much more fun writing poetry, even if it is not worth much'. Hopes Julian has managed to see Ursula at Taunton, and that she is well again. Has heard from G.M.T. [his brother George] that Charles is giving Wallington to the National Trust now instead of leaving it in his will; he will continue to live there, and one of the family (probably his son George Lowthian) will stay there after his death; this will save on death-duties so there will be much more money for the children. Supposes this should not be discussed until it is announced. Hopes Bessie will go with Miss Simpkins for a few days to George and Janet next month; otherwise she never 'goes away from here, which is not good for her'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Gives [Bernard] Berenson's address at Florence; he is being 'very pressing and says he will be alone', so Bob will start on 24 or 25 January and can stay till he goes on to the Hague, probably at the end of the month but this will depend on Bessie's news. Hopes her aunt is better. May be able to do some work at Florence. Sends a 'late-blossoming plum' with his kisses.

Letter from Margaret Vaughan Williams to R. C. Trevelyan

Leith Hill Place, Nr Dorking. - Found Bob's 'delightful present', the "New Parsifal", when they got home yesterday; thanks him and will 'value it very much as yet another proof' of Bob's friendship, which he knows is 'very precious' to her. Has as yet only looked at the 'very nice outside', but hopes to begin reading it today. Is 'very proud' to have it as a gift from Bob. Hopes he has had better news of his father; he must have had some 'very anxious days'. Also hopes Bessie and Julian are well again. Her mother is quite well now; they are 'rejoicing in the freshness and clearness of home - and birds singing'. Tells Bob he can come and stay any time he likes while Bessie is away; they can give him a 'quiet room to work in'. Asks if he has seen that the "Times Literary Supplement" is now to be sold separately: Evelyn Richmond says this is 'very important for her brother Bruce', since Lord Northcliffe apparently 'wants to get rid of the Supplement', returning book-reviewing to the main body of the paper, and 'does not believe there is a demand for it'. Would therefore be a good thing if many people who do not take the "Times" write in and subscribe for the "Supplement".

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Card from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Thanks Bessie for her note; is glad she feels [Donald Tovey's] symphony is 'a great work and solid as the classical works all are'; this is the only thing that matters, though Donald is 'more in a rage with the press than he need be'. Hopes he will now finish the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]. Remembers Fritz Busch saying there were four symphonies buried in Donald's piece (quotes the German). Was not the orchestra's fault last Monday: Donald was 'copying and patching parts' very late. Fears he is 'greatly exhausted'; he returned to Edinburgh on Thursday.

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