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Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1876–1962), historian, public educator, and conservationist
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Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland; addressed to Bob at 29 Beaufort Street, Chelsea, and forwarded to the National Liberal Club. - Is glad the show [an art exhibition organised by Roger Fry] is coming to Cambridge; has only even seen prints and engravings; has written to [Arthur] Shipley. Bob won the battle [of toy soldiers]. Had 'two splendid days' stalking and driving grouse with Howey and Shade.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

36 Chelsea Park Gardens, S.W.3. - Very interested in what Bob says about the 'Nō [Noh] Plays', and thinks the adaptation [in Bob's "Meleager"] 'most successful': the ghosts repeating 'the passions of the previously enacted drama' make it possible to leave out a depiction of the 'tragedy itself', which has been done often and involves many characters, without 'omitting the whole passion of the piece'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Rome. - Hopes Trevelyan has received his previous letter saying that everything is all right about the Deuchars; he just needs to know whether they should be met in Florence by Nicky [Mariano] or whether he should meet them later in Rome. Will be in Venice from Sept 5-7 for the PEN Congress. Is very sorry about Trevelyan's sister-in-law [Janet: news of her chronic illness]; appreciated her 'kindness and good natured intelligence'.

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Board of Education embossed card [possibly from Charles Trevelyan, appointed as parliamentary under-secretary]; dated 'Monday. - Molly has been telling them how much better Paul was yesterday; he is very glad to hear it. Read the last half of [Robert's] "Sisyphus" again, aloud to Jan and it read 'capitally'; they both like it all very much. Is giving it to many of his 'literary friends' and hears nothing but praise; he finds some of the metres are too difficult, which is his only complaint.

H. A. Hollond: correspondence arising from the television programme in honour of Bertrand Russell's 92nd birthday

A letter from C. D. Broad to Hollond dated 22 May 1964 correcting Hollond's account of the interview for the television programme on Bertrand Russell, and expressing his desire to let Russell know that he had been interviewed but cut from the programme, accompanied by a copy letter from Hollond to Russell dated 26 May 1964 incorporating this information and enclosing a copy of a letter of protest at Broad's treatment to the B.B.C. television executives. Hollond's letter to Russell shares memories of Russell's visit to give the Lowell Lectures at Harvard University in the spring of 1914, mentioning the visit of Rupert Brooke, a dinner with Roscoe Pound, his reaction to a recital by Alfred Noyes, a visit with Mrs Fiske Warren, and a dinner party with Amy Lowell and Elizabeth Perkins; he also mentions speaking with Victor Purcell on the telephone after a visit with Russell, and remembering a conversation between T. C. Nicholas, and George Trevelyan about giving Russell a Title B Fellowship. With added notes at the bottom in Hollond's hand identifying people mentioned in the letter.

Hollond, Henry Arthur (1884-1974) academic lawyer and historian

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear Elizabeth is comfortably settled at Florence; hopes she and Bob are enjoying their time with the Berensons; supposes they will reach Ravello around Christmas. Charles and Mary are back from 'ten days in their constituency with meetings every night'. There was a Women's Liberal Association meeting at Cambo on Wednesday; Charles chaired and Miss [Florence?] Balgarnie spoke, and it was an excellent meeting. Charles is now 'first rate' at public speaking, and Mary also can speak 'quite nicely'. Had a letter from Miss Somerville about the Westminster bazaar, which made forty pounds; she said the 'very nice things' which Elizabeth had sent sold quickly. Good to hear that Elizabeth and Robert's [new] house has got on so well; probably good for her to have a quiet time before she has to start thinking about moving, though it is possible to have so much. Caroline herself sometimes feels that at Wallington if she sees no one but Sir George for a week, though he - and Robert - are the 'best of company'. Hopes Elizabeth will come to Welcombe for Easter, when Robert is with his friends [on George Moore's reading holiday]. George is coming to them next week, and they go to Welcombe on 27 December. There is a 'great fuss' at the Grosvenor Cr[escen]t Club: the proprietress seems 'unsatisfactory', while the food and management have been 'very bad'; Caroline had decided to leave before she hear about the row. Julia seems to be the 'centre of it'; Caroline will send Elizabeth her letter. Julia is not 'very delightful or interesting, but she is perfectly respectable & not at all fast!'. Caroline paid Elizabeth's subscription on 17 January, so she had better write a resignation letter before then if she does not want to carry on; it is a great pity, as it 'was really a nice club at one time'. There will be a 'school treat' on Thursday, so she is hoping the mild weather will last. Is reading 'such a pleasant life of Burne Jones by his wife' ["Memorials of Edward Burne-Jones"]. Calls the Pre-Raphaelites 'an innocent high minded set, with all their absurdities'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Has not yet transferred the second fifty pounds to Bob's account since the lawyers have not yet 'transferred the personalty' [personal property of Florence Cacciola Trevelyan, which has come to George and Bob on the death of her husband Salvatore Trevelyan]. Mary is going to the Netherlands again in the first week of October, to work. He and Janet are going to Cambridge on Monday to look for a house; he will take up 'residence and full work there [as Regius Professor of History] in January'. Their mother was taken 'seriously ill' a few days ago; she has a nurse, but the doctor thinks she is over the immediate danger. George thinks it 'unlikely she will live more than another year' and that she will get to Welcombe again, though the plan was for her and Sir George to go in about three weeks. Their father 'seems fairly well, though on a permanently lower level than last year'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S. W. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; they were 'much amused and pleased at Goldie [Lowes Dickinson]'s horror of the man of war', but Bessie never 'saw Goldie dressed up in his war paint' as George did when they were 'volunteers together'. Afraid he and Janet cannot lunch on Wednesday 20th, and he is lecturing at Cambridge on Thursday 21st. Invites her to come to tea with them on Wednesday, or to dinner just with Jan on Thursday. Asks to be remembered to Jan [Hubrecht], and sends good wishes to his wife.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth has got home safely and that Julian is happy. Encloses a cheque from Sir George to settle their account [for the stay at Eastbourne]. Annie [Philips] and Robin [Price] have been here this afternoon; they came to the crematorium at Golders Green [for the cremation of her sister Margaret Price] and have just left for Pen Moel. Annie says it is 'dreadful to have 2 days!' and has promised not to go to Tibberton for the funeral tomorrow. Good of Charles and George to go this morning, as well as Morton [Philips], two of the Gregs, Annie Thompson and Betty Bostock [?]. Sir George is well, and she feels better; they had a 'quiet walk in Kensington Gardens' yesterday and today, and she has started taking a tonic. Looks forward to seeing Elizabeth on Friday.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - As he and Janet have 'hoped and expected' for a while, Mary has got engaged to John Moorman, who came to Hallington for a week in August; they met in June, at the Cornfords' musical parties in Cambridge. He left Cambridge this year, having stayed after his degree to train as a clergyman, and is now a curate in Leeds; he studied under [George Gordon] Coulton, who 'thinks highly of him'. He is 'liberal-minded', and George has discussed religion and history with him 'with much agreement and no feeling of barrier'. Moorman is also a 'fine walker' and is 'small but wiry'; his father was Professor of English at Leeds, and his mother is 'much respected in academic circles', and matron of a University hall in Leeds; their closest family friend is [Arthur] Grant, recently retired from the History Professorship there, a 'first-rate man'. Moorman's 'most intimate older and younger friends are Bishop Wyld [sic: Herbert Wild, Bishop of Newcastle], who conducted George and Bob's parents' funerals, and his son [John?]; in fact his 'whole entourage and atmosphere is about equally academic and clerical'. Thinks he will suit Mary very well, though 'not many people would', so he and Janet are much pleased.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is settled at Ravello and having a good Christmas day; expects it will be quiet, as theirs is. Had their 'very mild festivity' last night; George is staying, and C[harles], M[ary], and Mr Fitch came to dinner. They had music after dinner - Mary has greatly improved Charlie's singing - then 'played a letter game'. Most of their packing is done, and they leave [for Welcombe] on Tuesday; George will travel some of the way with them as he is joining Janet at Stocks for a week. The fogs in London, Manchester, Leeds and so on 'quite terrible last week'; hopes they will have gone. Asks if she may use one of Elizabeth's 'supernumeray [sic] silver inkstands' at Welcombe, as she is having a small room set up to use in the morning. George is well; he and Sir George discuss 'their respective works & the treatment of History &c &c &c at length & very amusingly'. Does not think George's book ["England Under the Stuarts"] has 'had a brilliant success', but it has been well reviewed. Asks to be remembered to Madame Palumbo; supposes Mrs Reid is still alive. Has received a postcard of Vesuvius from Heathcote Long so supposes he is somewhere near Naples. Asks if 'the diplomat' is any relation of Elizabeth's.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Metelliano. - Is happy to say that he is coming to England for the Executive Committee of the International PEN, taking place between 25-27 April. Is also planning to visit Roger Hinks in Holland. Must see Trevelyan, either in London or at the Shiffolds; is glad he is recovering, did not know he had been low. Saw a notice in the "Times" about [Reginald Popham] Nicholson's death, which must have affected B.B. [Berenson]. Will visit I Tatti just before coming to England. Has seen Raymond Mortimer, but missed [Stephen] Spender and Humphrey Sumner who were in Rome while he was in Paris with the W.F.U.N.A. Is very sorry about Trevelyan's sister in law [Janet: her illness]; would like to write to Trevelyan's brother [George]. Is almost sure to go to Edinburgh for the PEN Congress at the end of August.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Writing to tell her 'what a dear Paul is'; did not see him when he was ill, but he is 'all brightness now'; Paul mistook George for 'his daddy' when he first went in to see him 'and the disappointment caused a scene', but he soon got quite fond of him; the trick is not to touch him too soon. Paul is very like Bob, 'with his curls and all', and they are now great friends. Wishes Bessie 'good luck' [probably as she is due to give birth].

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Trinity College, Cambridge. - Likes "Cheiron" very much, and will be "proud of the dedication". Is much interested in Bob's latest classical plays, which take him into a thoroughly pleasant 'world of moral, intellectual and aesthetic imagination', and 'criticize real life' without 'directly setting out' to do so. Postscript at top of letter says that Humphry is enjoying his classical studies, and life in general, in Cambridge very much.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to R. C. Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - They returned home last night after a 'delightful week at Niton' [on the Isle of Wight]. Has now unwrapped the paper-case and blotting book which are 'pretty' and useful, and which he will greatly value as Bobbie's gifts. Will hope to receive few lines from Bobbie at the end of his first fortnight [at Harrow]; thinks he will be placed 'without further exam[inatio]n in Lower Remove', where the work will not be easy, with some of it familiar, so he need only keep from making 'avoidable blunders'. Hopes Bobbie will show them he has 'some idea of Latin Prose'. Asks him to tell George he will keep the same bed-room: Arnold will try to find someone George will like to share it with. Expects that after Midsummer he will share it with Booth's brother, who will join the school then. Is returning [James?] Welldon's letter, which Bobbie's mother 'kindly' let him read; thanks her for writing; he will reply to her when he has news about George. Hopes Bobbie's elder brother [Charles] has recovered, and that he will not 'lose his promotion': it would be 'very hard lines' if it did. Adds a postscript to say he is reading [John Robert] Seeley's "Expansion of England", and thinks Bobbie would like it: it is certainly 'more interesting than the dry-as-dust' he read for the Bowen prize; he can probably find it in his House library.

Postcard from Dora Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

Haies [?: postmarked Bristol]. - Interested to learn from Robert's 'delightful essay in Books that the Blatant Beast [allegory for calumny and slander in Spenser's "Faerie Queene"] is still at large'. She and Daphne [her daughter] are 'not among the "very few & very weary"' so had thought the Beast had suffered the same fate as the 'other powers of Evil'. Wishes she had seen the ponds when George took her to tea at Wallington once, but it 'would have been torture... not to bathe'. His point about the 'romance as well as the sensuous pleasure of bathing' is quite true; an essay could be written in itself on the 'various flavours' of bathing in different types of water. Postscript on address side of card notes that she lent out the first edition he sent her [of "Windfalls"?] and does not know to whom, so is very glad to get this one.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes that the snow in Italy has melted. Spent one night and '2 busy days' in London; Sir George went up for the day yesterday. Spent that evening with Janet, since George was at a 'review meeting' [for the "Independent Review"?], who is very well and 'enjoys the situation to the full'; approves of her preparations [for the forthcoming birth]. Thinks Charles and Mary are staying at Cambo till the end of the month. Mary has 'thoroughly got up the subject of Taxation of Land Values' and has given several short speeches on it; she has also written a leaflet which Caroline hopes to get printed for the W.L.F. [Women's Liberal Federation]. Good that she can help Charles politically. Wants Elizabeth's advice about pianos: there ought to be one at Welcombe, and she would 'like to change the monster in London!'. Has a room at Welcombe to write in now, so Elizabeth can now have the drawing room to herself to practice in. Expects Meg Booth will arrive [in Italy] soon. Asks if Elizabeth is thinking of going to Taormina this year; hopes the Grandmonts are well. "The Times" is 'so hard up for an argument for the sugar tax that they say it is unhealthy and that people should not eat so much'. A party of neighbours came for lunch recently, and more will come. Has had a 'nice letter' from Mrs Enticknap.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Thinks this [referring to an enclosure now not present?] is a 'really dear old letter'; he is 'human enough to prefer such 'thinking aloud' to 'propriety' though he would not have written it himself and hopes he will 'be spared a correspondence'. Very pleased that Elizabeth so likes his book ["Garibaldi and the Thousand"]; values her opinion 'highly'. She is 'quite right about the Sicilians'; if it were not for his considerable debt to 'individual Sicilians', he would have been 'more humorous at the expense of their absurd countrymen'. Comments on what a 'jolly time we have on the Fifth of November'. Is lunching with 'the Jans' [Jan Hubrecht and his wife] tomorrow at Cambridge. Notes in a postscript that he knows about Aunt Annie [Philips] and has heard from her.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - News of Julian, who is well despite not having a good night's sleep according to the nurse, who has just taken him off for a drive, 'he & old Maria [the maid?] looking equally delighted'; he is getting onto his feet more now. She herself will take him to the village this afternoon. Hopes Elizabeth found all well at home; was very good to have her for such a 'long quiet visit'; if only they had not had 'the sad little tragedy' [the death of George's son Theodore]. Has heard no more from George; hopes Geoffrey Young 'is helping to console him'. Enjoyed seeing Robert very much; hopes he can settle to work now. Mrs Catt says she has not had so much pain for the last few days.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Headed 'Private'. Encloses a letter from Aunt Annie [Philips: 13/229]. Suggests that if Bob does decide to write to their father as she suggests, he should begin by saying that he does not know whether their mother is 'really likely to leave us quite soon', but understands from Aunt Annie that this is a possibility, and that he is anxious that in that event their father should not hurry to leave Welcombe. Also thinks that Bob should say he and Bessie have 'no thought of moving into Welcombe' themselves.

Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Rapallo. - He and Janet are very glad to hear that Julian has put on eight ounces. They are having good weather and walks here by themselves, before 'going on south to join the Hammonds' [John and Barbara]. Thanks Bessie for sending 'Madame Scocco's letter' [sic: Irene Zocco]; fears he will not be able to go to Palermo again; would have called on her last month if he had known she was there.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - News of Julian, who is well and does not seem to be too much disturbed by teething. He is always very excited when he sees Hearn [the butler] and 'insists on his lifting him up to look at the pictures'. Took him for a drive to the village yesterday, and now he has gone for his 'last poney [sic] cart drive'. Elizabeth's dinner on Monday will be very amusing; hopes she will not get tired out with her busy fortnight. Annie [Philips] is coming from Monday till Thursday; expects she will be in an 'over-energetic mood'; she must have helped the two young men [her Price nephews] very much as they have been making inventories. Has had no more letters from George, but C[harles] says he is quieter [after the death of his son Theodore]. Sends love and a "Times Literary Supplement" for Bob.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - The Prime Minister has asked George to 'go to Cambridge [as Regius Professor of History]' and he has accepted; the 'K[ing]'s pleasure has yet to be taken' so this is still a secret. Has been to Cambridge and talked to the 'principal history dons there with satisfactory results' about what he can do, and need not do, there. [His book, "History Under] Queen Anne" will move more slowly, but she will move'. Expects they will move there in January; sketches out his movements for the next month or so; will have the 'fun of writing an Inaugural Lecture up in the North'. Discusses financial affairs, and the amount Bob can expect to receive from him [from the Hallington estate].

Card from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - The lawyers acting for Robert and George [in the matter of Florence Trevelyan's legacy] should see an old letter of 1884 which he has found; has written to George in London, as the lawyers must see Philipson personally. Philipson is 'the most honourable and kindly of men' and Sir George thinks all is going right.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Bessie for her letter, and for enclosing Madame [Irene] Zocco's; very glad to hear 'how well and splendid Julian is ', which makes up for their sadness about the nurse's illness. Glad Julian has curls; Humphry is also 'very curly' but this is 'more out of the family line' for them. He and Mary 'play Lake Regillus and Horatius on the Museum floor' with some soldiers and some 'ancient Romans' he once got in Switzerland; she is 'very clever and sharp at the uptake'. Meanwhile Theo usually rides the rocking horse, though he looks on a little, 'and spouts the poems' [by Macaulay]. He is 'very much interested' ('much' is an insertion as 'concession to Jan's hereditary ideas of grammar') about [Donald] Tovey; takes it that his progress [on the opera "The Bride of Dionysus", to Robert's libretto] is 'slow but sure'. Must be very interesting to watch him at work. Can easily believe what she says about Forster's book ["Howard's End"], which would make it 'like all his others'; he is 'just one half of a great writer' and could do with being boiled down by 'Peer Gynt's button moulder' with 'some ordinary mechanic writer who can spin him a common likely plot'. Sends love to Bob and wishes 'success to his Solomon, and the Sage' [a reference to Bob's "Foolishness of Solomon"?].

Note from Janet offering condolences for 'poor Nurse Catt's departure'; asks to be remembered to her before she leaves.

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