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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866–1934), art historian, critic, and painter
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Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Originally enclosing an account for housekeeping expenses: Trevelyan should take off the rent if he did in fact pay up to Lady Day. Explains how he has reckoned coal and wine. Had a good time on the river: Jack [McTaggart] 'delighted with his own absurdities and limitations'. Is going to Heathfield [Heathfield Park, home of William Cleverly Alexander?] again to paint.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ede - Ma Retraite. - Delay in writing on her return due to a few days in bed; their plans now finalised, and Trevelyan would be very welcome to visit in September. Is going to see her friends the Bowmans next week and will write to Mr and Mrs [Roger?] Fry if she does visit them for a day from Joldwynds. Most of July her 'married cousin Mrs Röntgen and her boys' will be with her, then in August 'she is going to Denmark taking her sister with her'. Hope Trevelyan will be able to come 'and have a look at Holland and Dutchmen! Some say [they] are not a specifically Dutch family' but they could perhaps show him some 'more so' if he liked. Is very much enjoying the letters of [Robert] Browning and his wife, calling them 'delightful, splendid creatures' and discussing their portraits; asks whether Robert Browning was Jewish. Will be in London for two days before going to Joldwynds, but does not ask him to meet her as she does not know her address there yet and fears there will be time for nothing but shopping: a 'nightmare' for her. Perhaps they could meet at Trevelyan's friend [Roger Fry]'s house.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hotel de la Plage, S. Pierre en Port, Sassetot le Mauconduit, Seine Inférieure. - Is still here 'imbibing good food, bad tobacco & French idioms', owes the last to the enthusiasm of Miss [Jane] Harrison, whom he should call 'Dr' since she has been made 'L..L.D.' [by Aberdeen University]. Has left La Roche Guyon, and joined [Dugald] MacColl, his sister [Elizabeth?] and Dr Harrison. Wishes Bob had been with him at La Roche; was alone for three weeks and reached 'a low kind' of Nirvana based on sun, wine, black coffee & two bathes in the Seine per day, as well as getting a lot of work done. Made friends with a peasant living in a chalk cave, 'a freemason atheist radical & general mauvais sujet'. Has now 'descended to civilization & villadom', though Miss Harrison mitigates these; she has 'a very masculine mind and is quite apostolic'. Finds that MacColl, however, is 'touched with Oxford & journalism'. Expects to return about the same time as Bob. Adds a postscript to say he is sorry Bob has been 'bad again', and hopes to be 'able to take care of [him] in time'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Hodgkin

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Will try to stop his letter 'lapsing into a scrawl at the end'. Glad that Edward and his sister are having such a good time at Rome; would like to be there himself very much, and may get there by the end of the year but fears Edward will be gone by then. Asks if Edward could disappear for a few months and 'be in hiding at Rome'; since he 'has no large sums from the Bank', his 'action could not be given a criminal interpretation'; tells him to hide in the painted tombs on the via Latina - or at least go and see them, and 'the robins hopping about among the cut roses'. Gives other sightseeing advice; tells Edward he should arrange with a dairy to have 'Devonshire cream, i.e. crema dura, every morning for breakfast'. He should also go to see the Pinturicchio in 'the Church on the Capitol' of the Magdaline [sic] 'walking about in the desert scantily clad reading a prayer book'; he himself 'must write a fan on her'. Is currently writing 'a play about Mantua and Greek Emperors and Gonzagaz, and Vittorino dei Feltre, and Vittor [?] Pisano, and charming and learned young ladies who won't marry the people their fathers tell them to' ["Cecilia Gonzaga"]; is also translating Ovid's "Metamorphoses", and writes out an extract from his version of the Daphne and Apollo episode. Plans to translate 'a few things from him and Propertius and Ronsard etc', and hopes Roger [Fry] will illustrate them if he has time. Verse beginning 'Knowst thou why Ovidius Naso / Mourned and sorrowed all his days so': because he knew who would illustrate and translate his work. Has never been to the Villa d'Este himself, but has heard much about it from the Frys; Roger has painted a 'very nice picture' of it, and said there were 'rose-wreathed cypresses' there which Bob has put into his poem "Juno's Peacock". Saw G.V. [Gilbert Venables?] recently, also saw Ronnie Norman at a concert, who 'seemed all right'. Asks Edward to let him know when he is returning, so they can meet in London; will answer his sister's letter soon.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

British Museum, London, W.C.1. - Has just heard that Oswald Sickert has lost his job with the Encyclopaedia Britannica and will be in England in about a fortnight looking for work. Corrects an impression given by his last letter: only met Adrian [Stephen: see 17/25] once and liked him, does not know him well. Asks if Bob could translate Aeschylus's "Prometheus" for the Art Theatre" as requested by [Vera ] Donnet; thinks his way of doing the chorus would 'work very well' for recitation. Was greatly bored by the first performance by the Art Theatre [George Farquhar's "The Beaux' Stratagem"]: everybody 'connected with it is completely Philistine', and he does not think that any good will come of it, though it will be no worse than 'the Stage Society, Pioneers, Plough, Bel Espoir, Paddington Players, Malleson's Mimes or anything of the rest'.

Has arranged to publish his next book ["More Translations from the Chinese"] with Allen and Unwin; Constable's [who published his first book] is 'a nuisance to get to'. [Eugene] Morice has died of illness at Salonika and his bookshop [in Museum Street] is for sale; would be 'great fun' to run it, but he is afraid there is not 'enough sustenance in it for Oswald'. Has translated about thirty more poems of Po Chu-I for the new book, but may 'weed them out a bit', as well as a new version of Ou-yang Hsiu's "Autumn Dirge'. [Gordon] Luce's poems have been 'an appalling blow'; liked some of them at first, but now 'hate[s] them all'. Asks if anyone has seen [Charles] Vildrac and whether he is translating any more of Po Chu-I into French. Does not think he has seen Roger Fry since Bob went away. The Dickinsons [Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson and his two sisters] are soon to move into the upper storey at 13 Hanover Terrace.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Sends his letter to Westcott, rather than care of Mrs Pepper, so that it is sure to reach Trevelyan. He and his mother have found a house, called Glendore, at Weybridge, which he describes in detail. Had a pleasant visit to [Roger] Fry in London. May go to Munich in the winter, but hopes to see Trevelyan before then.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Road, Hampstead. - Finds it hard to write what he feels about the suggestion put to him by [John?] Withers: Bob's 'constant and affectionate interest' is 'one of the most precious things' in his life; if it were necessary he would accept [the offer of help], which he cannot imagine doing from someone like Bob; expresses his gratitude and 'the sense of perfect reliance and affection'. His father has given him some help, and B.B. [Bernard Berenson] has managed to sell the Venetians; Fry has also nearly finished three restorations. When he has done so, and written some reviews, he intends to get to work on Bob's 'rabbits' picture [see 13/17]. Helen is not quite recovered, but nearly; the nurse has gone and she is taking an interest in household things; Edith [her sister] is making sure everything runs smoothly.

The Old Masters [exhibition at the Royal Academy] are 'the chief interest in now' London; disagrees with the attribution of a picture in it to Dürer, but [Charles] Holmes 'committed the Athenaeum' to it while Fry was away. Bob might like to join the new Arundel Club, fpr the reproduction of works of art in private collections. The "Burlington [Magazine]" is doing well and Holmes is showing 'infinite energy & business capacity' [as editor]. Relates a scandal created when [William Bell] Paterson asked Fry for his opinion on a painting, which Fry judged to be largely modern paint over the possible outline of a Giovanni Bellini; the painting turned out to have been sold by K[err] Lawson to Coates [unidentified] for a large sum; 'always feared that K.L. was not over scrupulous about his ascription of pictures' and thinks this may damage him 'considerably'; Kerr Lawson has 'sent his "Titian" as a Bonifazio [Veronese] to the Old Masters [exhibition] and ought to sell that.

Would be 'jolly' if Bob could write [Fry's sister] Margery's masque [for the opening of the new library at Somerville College, Oxford, see 4/55 and 4/104]; hope he has forgiven the suggestion he could 'polish it off quickly', as Fry likes to 'think of a poet as a perennial fount, bubbling up and overflowing with limpid words', and praises his skill with mythology. Has written 'an extravanganza on Blake for the Burlington' ["Three pictures in tempera by William Blake', Burl. Mag, Mar 1904 4 p 204]. Julian is very amusing, and has begun to sing a little; Edith has a cello here and Fry is accompanying her 'in very simple things' - tells Bob not to let his wife know - which Helen enjoys.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, London Rd, Dorking. - The past month has been as happy as any he and his wife have know, and Nell is quite her old self. They have begun house-hunting for Trevelyan and seen one which may suit him, though it is rather near the railway. Would like to send Francesca some Indian silk and cotton but knowing what the Italian customs are like will send them to Trevelyan.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, Dorking. - Is glad Trevelyan is back: will be working on the Colchester lecture until the 18th so invites him to visit then. The Albert Hall ones are finished and went well. He and Helen have not yet found Trevelyan a house, though the one they looked at [see 4/20] is still free; the wine has not arrived yet. Asks how Trevelyan's play "Cecilia" ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] is getting on. Helen and Goldie [Dickinson] are 'offensively & increasingly Daily Telegraphic together'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Road, Hampstead. - Is writing to Bob's mother to say he will do the pastel, but not until the autumn; he and Helen hope to get to Oxford on Thursday to stay with Mrs [Christiana] Herringham and Mrs Flower if Helen is well; she has been 'very seedy' following a miscarriage but is 'wonderfully well in mind'. Has had 'another beastly summer' and cannot leave if she is not allowed to, as Edith [Helen's sister] will leave for her holiday soon. Is starting his article for the "Independent [Review?]" but wishes he had not promised it. Bob's story about Millais is lovely. Etching originally enclosed; 'a first attempt without any lesson so it was all guesswork', but means to return to it later, and to do the picture for Bob this year. Yes, the [book on] Titian is by 'the same [Georg] Gronau'; it is very good but dull to read, and not as good as his later book on Leonardo; is reviewing it [for the "Athenaeum", Sept 10 1904].

Has been to stay with [Neville] Lytton. States ironically that the [Royal] Academy has discovered that the Inquiry [by a Select Committee of the House of Lords into the Academy's administration of the Chantrey Trust] is really intended 'to advertise Lytton's drawings'. His own evidence was not printed in the papers, and lasted only half an hour; Lord Carlisle tried to catch him out 'by quoting the Athenaeum' but did not succeed. The Royal Academicians 'are physically mentally & morally on the level of small tradesmen'. [Dugald] MacColl was 'wonderful': gave evidence 'for 4 hrs without a slip' and would have 'made his fortune at the bar'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Very sorry to hear the news about Elizabeth's uncle; hopes this new anxiety will not last long; reassures her about the success of modern operations. Sorry the boy [Augustus Enticknap] has measles; it is 'a light illness at this time of year'. Elizabeth must be careful about infections, and 'not let other people be exposed to it without their knowledge': the Frys should not come to the house while 'Mrs E. is going about her work freely'. Asks when Elizabeth will come up; thought the dress 'very pretty'; Pantlin should be ready for another fitting at the end of the month. A postscript tells her to ask Robert whether he 'remembers giving the measles to Arnold's boys'

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Forster's plans are disturbed as his aunt has not been well enough to have him and his mother to stay. Would like to come and see Trevelyan. Has just been to stay with E. H. Young near Marlborough and then walked to the White Horse, Wantage, and Goring along the Icknield Way. Sidgwick and Jackson are interested in publishing his short stories; they suggest illustrations, which he does not want; he would though be happy with illustrated end-papers and asks if Fry likes his stories enough to design these. Sidgwick and Jackson's letters originally enclosed: 'Hellfellows' is 'an awful work of Housman's' ["All-fellows: Seven Legends of Lower Redemption," by Laurence Housman] which the publishers wanted Forster's work to resemble. 'Marguerite was well rid of Mat' [Matthew Arnold]. Does not think Stokoe's idea to take a BA degree and teach a good one.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Road, Hampstead. - Hopes this will reach Bob before he leaves; a 'second American invasion' [related to the offer of a post at the Metropolitan Museum, New York] has taken all his time. He and Helen are grateful for the tickets and hope to get more music; he will definitely introduce himself to Miss [Sophie] Weisse and hopes to get to know [Donald] Tovey who may reform him. No money has come to Fry from Brimley Johnson's 'insatiable maw'; it is good of Bob to bother himself about it. Hopes to have something good for the 'great Agnew show' ['Some examples of Independent Art of today', Agnew's. Feb-Mar 1906]; they are 'all being done by Max [Beerbohm] for "Vanity Fair"; rather dreads it but 'one can't say that its not true of oneself after admiring him on others in print'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth is coming north earlier; the weather is so fine that they have been wishing she and Robert were with them now, but thinks the arrangement 'very good' and will expect them at the start of August. If Robert will let her know the time, she will invite R[oger] Fry to meet them here. Has deferred the school children's party till 16 August, as Sir George thought it would be nice if she and Robert were here. Asks if a garden party would 'bore' Elizabeth; thinks she should do something this summer for the neighbours. Asks if she should get Miss [Mary] Wakefield to come and perform: her 'lecturing is very bad, but her singing was very popular'. Tells Elizabeth to send a box of clothes direct from London if she likes, and asks if they are going to The Park [home of Annie Philips] in July or after the visit to Wallington. Thinks Elizabeth is right to go to Mrs Scharlieb again; tells her to asks how much she ought to walk.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry to think of Elizabeth in London for two nights; hopes she will not tire herself. Tells her to write when she is settled at Seatoller. The weather is delightful at Wallington; had to go to Newcastle on Saturday but hopes will escape other expeditions for the moment. Wishes Elizabeth and Robert were here; afraid hot weather will not last. Asks when she should invite R[oger] Fry to come and see them. A postscript suggests travelling at night if the heat continues.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very pleased that Elizabeth and Robert will come to Glasgow [for the International Exhibition]; hopes it will be cooler by the 29th; has written to book rooms at the Windsor Hotel. Suggests returning to Wallington on Wednesday; [Roger] Fry will come on the 1st or 2nd August. Asks if Elizabeth would like her Dutch papers to be forwarded.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth finds her 'new quarters' comfortable. Has reserved rooms at the Windsor Hotel in Glasgow, and thinks she will come on the early train arriving between 2 and 3 in the afternoon; thought of going to the E[xhibition] that afternoon for a first sight, and wonders when Elizabeth and Robert can be there. Hopes it will not get too hot again until they have left Glasgow. Does not think Elizabeth's [Dutch news]paper is coming now.

Letter from Roger Fry to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Durbins, Guildford. - D. F. T. [Donald Francis Tovey] visited yesterday; they had a 'delightful time'. He approved of Fry's piano and played all sorts of things on it. He seemed 'quite to realize how serious the situation was & how necessary it was that he should manage some of his own affairs'. Does not know if Tovey has 'the strength to hold out against her wiles' [a reference to Sophie Weisse], but he does realise 'she is capable of spoiling all his relations'. Hopes it will do good: Tovey 'is so nice'. Does not know when he will be able to get over; has to spend some time with [his wife] Helen this week, and is behindhand with things at Durbins.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Mentions a 'heated Wagnerian discord' on the last occasion he and Trevelyan met; expects he himself as a third party was most exasperating. Wishes they were coming north to see Trevelyan: wants to talk to him about Moore's poems ["The Vinedresser and Other Poems"?] which he tends to appreciate. Sees many traces of [George] Meredith there. Discusses books: [William] Roscoe's life of Lorenzo [de' Medici] is very good; didn't see the Leonardo but thinks it must be incomplete, as well as 'faked and edited'; doesn't know Nicolini but expects it will be good reading; 'Eber's thing' [?] is very popular, he has not read it himself and does not think it can be first rate from its enthusiasts. Has painted a tempera picture of Shillingley Park [sic: Shillinglee Park?] which he thinks his best so far. Asks Trevelyan to visit before they go to Italy and see about his house.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hendaye. - Was so busy after his visit to the Netherlands that he did not write and thank Bob for his letter to [Abraham?] Bredius; missed Bredius twice at the Museum and at Scheveningen, but managed to see most of the pictures at the Hague and Leiden. Praises the Hague gallery and the Mauritzhuis; the picture he went to see at Leiden ["Quintus Fabius Maximus", attributed to Rembrandt, now lost] was interesting, 'very late very ugly but imposing'. Covets some 'wonderful pictures' he found at a dealers, but got some good drawings there, including a 'superb Rembrandt'. The 'Rijksmuseum is too much of a good thing'; discusses the Dutch School, Rembrandt's "The Night Watch" and his "Anatomy Lesson" paintings at the Hague and Amsterdam. Criticises de Hoogh [Pieter de Hooch] for 'having painted so many second rate things', but Brouwer and Jan Steen have gone up in his estimation. Started this letter at Paris but was forced to stop due to the jolting of the train so is finishing it at Hendaye; hopes their journey to Spain will not be 'held up by a general strike'. Love to Bessie from him and Helen.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Asks if her can come to stay from Wednesday to Friday, which means he will see [Donald] Tovey. Will visit his aunt on the way; asks if his visit can be kept quiet as surprise visits tire her less. Good news about Fry [that he is willing to design endpapers for "The Celestial Omnibus and other stories", see 3/22] but will do nothing until he hears from Sidgwick and Jackson again.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - The 'bits of furniture' Elizabeth and Robert have got will be a 'great improvement'; the hall is so pretty it was a shame to keep the 'ugly bookcase'; thinks the sideboard will be a 'nicer & more permanent present than the wine'. Glad that Elizabeth liked the Joneses [Herbert and Lily?]; 'always delightful when friends keep up to one's ideal'. Had a party of visitors this week but they have now all left: Sir Kenelm and Lady Digby, old friends of hers and Sir George's; Charles [Roden]? and Victoria [Alexandrina?] Buxton; and Jack and Alice Pollock. They 'made plenty of noise in the evening over various games; there was a shoot, when the 'girls went to Rothbury & spent the day on the Crag Side Hills'; another day everyone went to Rothbury Lake and Crag. Charlie went off for two days walking with Charles Buxton, who is 'better & stronger than he was'. as is Victoria, but they still both have 'very delicate health' which is 'most unfortunate as they are so full of life & interests'. Sends love to Robert and hopes 'the publisher [Reginald Brimley Johnson] has been amenable'; it 'will be most interesting to see the drawings [by Roger Fry; for Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"]'. Hopes the Frys are well and the baby [Julian] 'flourishing'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the visit of her friend [Miss de Natrys]. Sorry to hear she has nettle rash, which is a 'horrid thing'; she herself had it for several weeks on her return from therr travels this year. Glad Robert is better and hopes he will soon make progress; asks if he is working on the novel. Asks if [Roger Fry's] illustrations [for Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"] are finished, and if the arrangement has been made with the publisher [Johnson]. Theo [Llewelyn] Davies is here today, as are Mr [Charles Francis, Jr] and Mrs Adams; the Adamses are American, and he has corresponded with Sir George for a long time so they are keen to meet each other. Tomorrow they are expecting the G [?] Buxtons and two daughters. Asks Elizabeth to write from Pinewood to say how Aunt Margaret [Holland] is. Hopes Robert and Elizabeth will be able to make their landlord do the repairs.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Is grateful for Trevelyan's letter: asks him to send a post card to 21 Hill Street ["Life and Letters"] with the date of the "New Statesman" issue in which his article appeared. Had himself noticed a resemblance, between [W. H.?] Davis and Herrick since he has been reading the "Hesperides", which he discusses. Knows how much Trevelyan misses Roger [Fry], and says they should 'always keep near each other'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will be eager to hear what Mrs Scharlieb thinks and what Elizabeth decides to do; very sorry she has something 'so unpleasant to look forward to' but sure she will be better afterwards. Would like it to be when she is in London herself, but Elizabeth must decide; Sir George says he will pay for it. Thinks Elizabeth and Robert's arrangement with their landlord very good; sure they will want to move before long but does not think the time has come yet. Hope [Roger] Fry has returned and the book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] 'will advance properly'. Quite cold at Wallington now; Sir George has a fire in his study but otherwise they only have them in the evening; hopes Elizabeth will keep herself warm. Sure Elizabeth would like to keep chickens and have her own eggs. Has seen 'Miss H's' letter and will get her article. B[ernard?] Shaw is 'really beneath contempt'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Rodney House, Montpelier, Weston Super Mare. - The whole family had a good short holiday at Burford then went to Failand together; from there Fry went on to London to finish some work before his trip to Normandy and Helen took the children to Weston. Helen then developed scarlet fever and had to be taken to an isolation hospital; the children and nurse returned to Failand where they also became ill; will be anxious for a while but hopes the children's attack is mild. Will have to divide his time between Hampstead, Failand and Weston for the next six weeks; Helen is 'of course fearfully lonely' but luckily her room is on the ground floor so he can visit and talk to her through the window; encourages Bob to write to her. Glad Bob liked his article. Cannot write more as is trying to get an article ready for the "Quarterly Review" [published in October 1904]; feels as if they are 'pursued by a malignant Fate' as he has had almost two years of constant anxiety about Helen and the children. They may come to Dorking for a while when Helen comes out of hospital, unless they go abroad after all. A postscript details when he will next be in London.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Sorry he did not return earlier and see Julian, and must try to visit him at Mayortorn[e] this term; glad he and Elizabeth had such a good time in the Netherlands; he also enjoyed his time in Italy, though he did get a mild case of the mumps. The people he stayed with were burning old letters, and gave him some old stamps, 'mostly Russian and German' which may be valuable; also sends some modern ones which Julian can use as swaps if he has them. [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is visiting; he hoped to see the azaleas but they are late flowering this year; they heard nightingales singing last night; asks if Julian knows which of the poets who 'has a street called after him in the new suburb of Hurtenham [his imaginary town]' wrote a poem about nightingales. Saw [Gordon] Luce, 'who also has the honour of a street', in Paris, and visited various oriental museums with him; Luce then went to Marseille to board his ship; very sad that he will not return from Burma for three or four years. Glad that Julian is 'now in the second class'. When in Italy, paid several visits to the father of Miss [Avice] Trench [a teacher at Julian's school, Mayortone] at his 'beautiful villa'. Alice and Peter [Elms] have had bad colds, but are now recovering.

Quotes from a poet who 'has not yet had a Hurtenham street called after him' [Julian?] but is still much interested in that city; has been reading the April number of his magazine, which seems 'on the whole a very well-written publication' and the spelling shows a 'marked improvement'. The 'affair of the ghosts is very remarkable'; would like to visit Hurtenham and bring his 'friend Roger Fry the art-critic, who would write an account of this interesting ghostly statuary for the Burlington Magazine'. Happy to be home; Italy 'very beautiful, but no more than here, though some day they 'must all go to Italy together'. Must stop now, as Dickinson wants him to play chess.

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