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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Autobiographical sketch by R. C. Trevelyan

Describes: his studies at Cambridge; brief time as a pupil in the chambers of T. E. Scrutton, which would have been a 'great privilege and opportunity' if he had only had 'any talent for the law'; a long holiday at Corpo di Cava in southern Italy to recover from influenza, where he began to write a 'long, rambling... romantic modern novel' on the theme of incest, inspired by Ibsen's "Little Eyolf; outdoor composition; his turn to writing poetry, in which he was encouraged by Roger Fry.

Pencil notes at the back of the book sketching out further topics for the autobiographical account, such as [Thomas] Sturge Moore; 'Taormina - Bessie - Mrs [Florence] Cacciola - Holland'; writing the libretto [for the "Bride of Dionysus"] for Donald Tovey; his translation of Aeschylus; Welcombe [his inheritance of the house from his mother?]; at the bottom of this page, the other way up, there is the beginning of an account of a gentleman living 'not long since, in one of the northern counties of England'.

Letter from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

2 Rue St Martin, Neauphle-leChateau, (S[eine] et O[ise]) [from envelope). - Apologises for not replying sooner to Trevelyan's letter: being in the country he has been working very hard, although has not therefore done anything which has satisfied him. Did not see [Francis] Birrell at all: he cannot come to Marchand's house without Marchand knowing. Marchand left at the end of May and came to a 'little place' in the Isle de France, Neauphle-le-Château. Sonia [Lewitska] is already doing better than she was in Paris but she still has a lot to do to recover completely. He 'regenerates himself as well as he can, without having found the ardour of the past': believes the last five years will 'weigh heavily' on their 'much-maltreated generation'. Vignier [?] is 'always equal to himself', and claims in fact to surpass himself as he is working hard to progress without a pause. Saw Miss Deacon twice during her stay at Paris, but in a very unexpected way. Regrets that he has not received Roger Fry's article, and so has not thanked him, but hopes to send soon to send Fry an almanac he has illustrated in collaboration with several artists. Hopes to come to London some time around November; will be very pleased to meet Trevelyan's wife and 'young amateur of landscapes' [Julian], who seems typically English to him as he has often noticed that the English have a 'predilection' for this genre of painting. Sonia has finished her woodcuts for the Joinville [Jean de Joinville, "Le Livre des Saintes Paroles et des bons faits de Notre Saint Roi Louis"], and they both send best wishes to both Trevelyans. Adds a postscript that he does not have many details about his exhibition [at the Carfax Gallery?]: asks whether it was not 'too disparate' despite the range of periods it covered.

Letter from Sonia Lewitska to R. C. Trevelyan, with postscript from Jean Marchand

Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and what he has done to help her: it is a 'great moral path' for her, and she hopes that with the help of a heart 'as great and generous' as Trevelyan's, she will be able to 'remedy this misfortune'. She encloses her letter to [Maxim] Litwinof and also that to her little one [her daughter Olga]. Adds in a postscript that she is also enclosing her letter to 'the sister of Monsieur Fray' [Roger Fry's sister Ruth, general secretary of the Friends War Victims Relief Committee]: asks him to read it, and if he does not think it too foolish to give it to her; also to let her know the response as soon as possible. If there is no hope of sending a Quaker to search for her daughter, she will go herself immediately to Warsaw (she is applying for her passport) and perhaps there will be a way of getting to Kiev from there. Marchand despairs and does not want her to leave because she is so weak; she is made worse due to her 'torment' [of worry for her daughter]. She went to the Ukraninian mission [embassy?] again yesterday, and spoke there to a colonel who came from Kiev a month ago, who says that Kiev has become a 'totally dead city', and that everyone who can has left; the peasants no longer bring their produce as when they do the Bolsheviks requisition it and take it to Moscow; they take everything from 'unfortunate Ukraine', which is becoming increasingly poor. There are no trams or streetlights working; worse, there is no piped water, and those like her family who live a distance from the river are suffering terribly. People cannot get new clothes, or shoes; they go bare-footed with boards tied to their feet; lack of water means that there is much dirt and fever. The colonel said the 'atmosphere is so sad and overwhelming', and that he himself was maddened almost to suicide, but preferred to 'do even the lowest work here and eat only dry bread than to return there'. He travelled for a week in goods wagons, standing all the way, 'packed in like cattle' with ill, dirty, drunk and coarse people. She does not know if she can live knowing that her daughter is so much suffering there.

Marchand writes to Trevelyan on the back of Sonia Lewitska's letter: thanks him for everything he has done for Sonia: is very saddened by all that [Sonia has learned] . Had news this January from Mademoiselle [Angela] Lavelli. Asks how Trevelyan's family is. Has not seen [Francis] Birrell again.

Postcard from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Feels guilty towards Trevelyan: every day means to write to him and then puts it off. Is at Vence with Roger Fry at the moment: they often work together, and often talk of Trevelyan. Asks how [Francis] Birrell is. The weather is quite good; many flowers are growing and the croaking of the frogs in the evening is 'alarming'. Thinks he will definitely be in Paris when Trevelyan comes back from Italy and passes through, to have the pleasure of seeing him. Is not going to London this year. Sends regards to Mrs Trevelyan.

Postcard from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Was very sorry not to see Trevelyan during his visit. Met Roger Fry again here; they have talked about Trevelyan, and Fry has translated an article about him from an English newspaper; it was very complimentary and Fry says justly so. Translating the article, and commenting on it, almost made Fry miss his train. Hopes to see Trevelyan in England in May.

Letter from Ruth Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Thorpeness, Suffolk. - Robert's poems ["From the Shiffolds"] were a 'delightful surprise': it is a great 'comfort... to turn away from the utterly beastly war to poetry, or music or the like'. The world is 'nearly intolerable' and the war 'seems quite interminable'; hopes it has not treated Robert 'too cruelly' and that he has not had too many doodlebugs. They [she and her friend Lady Dorothea Gibb] were 'on their route for many nights', and the guns against them 'made a devil of a row', but it has been more peaceful recently; she sees however that the death toll from the doodlebugs was 'dreadfully high' last month. Is glad Roger [her brother] is not here to 'endure it'. 'Poor Holland must be suffering terribly': expects the Trevelyans are 'longing for news', as she is herself of 'one dear friend there'. Sends some of her 'own products', though quite different to Robert's; he need not read or acknowledge them. Her anthology, "Ruth's Gleanings", is 'obstinately out of print like most books'. Hopes next year will bring 'a happier world in every sort of way'.

Draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to [Jean Marchand]

On headed notepaper of the National Liberal Club, Victoria Street, S.W.1. - On returning to London, he talked to Ruth Fry, Roger's sister, who is the president of the 'Mission des Amis' [Friends War Victims Relief Committee]. She said that communication with Russia was very difficult at the moment, but that if Marchand wants to arrange to get his niece [actually Olga Lewitska, daughter of Sonia Lewitska -see 22/56] out of Ukraine, it would be best to write to [Maxim] Litvinoff at the Hotel Cosmopolite, Copenhagen, asking for his help and advice as the one responsible for admitting foreigners to Russia and getting them out. Ruth Fry doubted that Litvinoff would consent to helping with such a case, but it might perhaps still be worth trying, and strongly suspected that it would not be possible to get the girl out. Might be possible to send letters to Kiev through Litvinoff.

Trevelyan will write to [Francis] Birrell to go and see Marchand as soon as he arrives in Paris; Roger Fry will also give his advice when he arrives. If it is better to send a letter as soon as possible, advises him to write to Litvinoff and send that letter to Trevelyan, who will ask Ruth Fry to send it as she is in communication with Litvinoff; this may make him pay more attention to the matter. Necessary to decide before writing whether they want to try and get Marchand's niece out of the Ukraine, or simply to send letters. Wishes he could give more definitive advice, but will do his best to help if he sends a letter. Marchand knows how much Trevelyan is sorry for the pain Madame Marchand [Sonia Lewitska] is experiencing at the moment, and how much he would like to help if he could.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Hopes Uncle Paul has the 'same delightful weather' as they do: it is 'almost too hot'. Bessie is well except for a 'cold in her throat'. Hopes Uncle Paul's rheumatism has gone. Their 'Dutch bulbs' are doing well: the hyacinths are 'splendid', and though Bessie thinks she planted the tulips too deeply, the flowers are 'very good'. The crocuses were over when they came [back from Italy]. The birds are singing: he heard 'several nightingales yesterday'. Roger and Helen Fry's son Julian is a 'very healthy looking young man, and his parents seem very happy with him'; though his 'chin and lower jaw are small and undeveloped', Bessie says that is often the case with babies, and 'Johannes Röntgen used to be even worse'. Roger and Helen Fry seem 'quite well now'. Has been reading the Hans Andersen which Uncle Paul and Aunt Maria gave him alongside a German version and thinks he will 'get on quite fast' with his German. They have put the photograph of Aunt Maria which Bessie brought back on the mantelpiece of the library, where they sit in the evening; it is the one from a couple of years ago, which resembles 'Bramine's last picture' of her; he likes having it there as it reminds him of her as he 'first knew her'. However, she did not change much for him even after she became very ill; even last winter [just before her death], her 'cheerful and kind face and expression' were 'essentially the same'. Hopes Tuttie is well. They much enjoyed their recent stay at the Hague, and were 'made very comfortable' and looked after well by Tuttie.

"The Abinger Chronicle", Vol. 4. No.4.

Contains: poem, "The Flycatcher", by Sylvia Lynd; "Sicily" by S. S. [Sylvia Sprigge]; "Intellectual Conversation" by Arthur Waley, which mentions Maynard [Keynes], Francis [Birrell], Hugh Dalton, Roger Fry, Gerald [Shove] and Sebastian [Sprott]; sketch in memory of Edmund [not Edward, as on cover] Gosse by Max Beerbohm; poem, "Lying Among the Yellow Flowers", by Kenneth Hopkins; poem, "Complaint", by Diana Lodge.

Memorandum by R. C. Trevelyan regarding his friendship with Roger Fry

Brief account of how Fry inspired a love of art in Trevelyan (previously, like "most Cambridge men.. completely ignorant of art') when they shared a house in Chelsea, and of Fry's life and character. Describes Virginia Woolf's biography of Fry as giving 'a very fully account of him, which seems... not only imaginative and sympathetic, but just and true'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Tried to ring up, but the telephone was out of order. Sorry to hear Bessie's news, especially as he was hoping to see her more often. Asks where she is going: he and Goldie [Dickinson] used to like Lyme Regis; Sidmouth has a new public garden laid out by Dartington Hall; he likes Eastbourne the best of the nearer resorts. Asks if she sent a letter to Gerald Heard at the Buckinghams: B. [Bob] is intrigued. Is enjoying Roger's book [Roger Fry's translations of Mallarme?].

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Distressed to hear things did not go well [regarding the birth of the Trevelyans' son, Julian?] and glad they seem to be better again. Is glad that Moore thinks his book good: says that he 'never understand[s] Moore but like[s] him very much', then corrects himself when he realises not G.E. Moore but [Thomas] Sturge Moore is meant. Was at Lady Ottoline's yesterday and saw Fry; his wife is at home and he seems in good spirits. Went to 'the Sicilians' [the production of Sinopoli's "La Zolfara" at the Lyric Theatre?]

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Sends his letter to Westcott, rather than care of Mrs Pepper, so that it is sure to reach Trevelyan. He and his mother have found a house, called Glendore, at Weybridge, which he describes in detail. Had a pleasant visit to [Roger] Fry in London. May go to Munich in the winter, but hopes to see Trevelyan before then.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Forster's plans are disturbed as his aunt has not been well enough to have him and his mother to stay. Would like to come and see Trevelyan. Has just been to stay with E. H. Young near Marlborough and then walked to the White Horse, Wantage, and Goring along the Icknield Way. Sidgwick and Jackson are interested in publishing his short stories; they suggest illustrations, which he does not want; he would though be happy with illustrated end-papers and asks if Fry likes his stories enough to design these. Sidgwick and Jackson's letters originally enclosed: 'Hellfellows' is 'an awful work of Housman's' ["All-fellows: Seven Legends of Lower Redemption," by Laurence Housman] which the publishers wanted Forster's work to resemble. 'Marguerite was well rid of Mat' [Matthew Arnold]. Does not think Stokoe's idea to take a BA degree and teach a good one.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Asks if her can come to stay from Wednesday to Friday, which means he will see [Donald] Tovey. Will visit his aunt on the way; asks if his visit can be kept quiet as surprise visits tire her less. Good news about Fry [that he is willing to design endpapers for "The Celestial Omnibus and other stories", see 3/22] but will do nothing until he hears from Sidgwick and Jackson again.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Weybridge. - Thanks Trevelyan for the cheque. Encourages him to read [Wilfred Scawen] Blunt after Goldie [Dickinson]. Has just received the proofs of his 'worthy' piece for the "Nation". Is glad Trevelyan 'has unlocked the key of blue' [?] and that Charlotte interests him. Dined with Roger [Fry] and Clive Bell last night, and '[b]iffed all their art bosh'.

Notebook with draft of a talk on Leopardi, biographical notes on Sir Donald Tovey, essays from "Windfalls"etc

List of names ('T[homas] S[turge] M[oore], C[harles] T[revelyan?], Joan [Allen]') marked with circles and crosses, on inside cover [perhaps a distribution list?]. Draft verse, 'Tender is the night and clear...'. Notes for a talk on Leopardi, including translations. Second list of names ("Rose Macaulat, Mortimer, Moormans…) [distribution list?]. Biographical sketch on Donald Tovey, covering topics such as his habits, methods of composing for "The Bride of Dionysus", other operatic projects of Tovey, his thoughts on literature and sense of humour. Last section. of Trevelyan's essay on "Courage". List of names ('Voltaire? Goethe? Gladstone? Dizzy?'); perhaps a list of possibilities to be included in a piece, especially as it is followed by a conversation between Horace and Thersites. Dialogue between 'Hic' and 'Ille' [unfinished]. List of topics under the heading 'What I believe'. "On Kindness". "On Translating Montaigne". "Disinterestedness". Piece on Chinese poetry. Extract from "Simple Pleasures".

Book also used from other end in: rough notes and calculations on inside cover and first page, including a reference to Virginia Woolf's posthumous collection "Death of a Moth"; translation of Horace's "Ars Poetica" from line 445; nature notes; notes on Roger Fry, including comments on Augustus Daniel, Charles Ricketts etc; essay on a conversation with [Bernard] Berenson ["A Lost Talk"]; notes on Clifford Allen; "Lost Things"; "On Books" and other pieces.

Notebook

Prose narrative about Coryat's visit to the 'guest-killing mosque at Rai', which shifts to dramatic form for Coryat's encounter with a Stranger who may be Death; story of Coryat continued in pencil, describing his encounter with an old Chinese man and their discussion of will and the spirit.

Two lines of a poetic epistle to Roger [Fry] written after Fry's death; draft account of Helen Fry and her relationship with Roger, probably written to aid Virginia Woolf with her biography of Fry [published in 1940; see also 17/95, 17/96, and 17/97], this includes some unpublished details of Helen Fry's illness such as her fear of her doctor, and the effect of Hubert Crackanthorpe's suicide.

Notebook also used from the other end in: draft verse; another version of Coryat's discussion with the old Chinese man; draft of introduction to the second volume of Trevelyan's "Collected Works", his verse plays; continuation of the 'Coryat' piece, in which the young man is introduced by the Old Man to 'B.R', a 'philosopher and a sceptic' [a hardly disguised Bertrand Russell?, and then reminisces about his childhood friendship with his cousin Miranda; translation of Horace "Satires" 2.3.39-62 and 23 to the end; essay on "Solitude"; essay on Robert Browning; essay on "Juvenilia", which begins by quoting Trevelyan's childhood poem "Oh Hector, I do love thee" [see 23/121/14]; notes for "Simple Pleasures"; notes on bees; short sections of verse, some perhaps translations.

List entitled 'My Friends' on flyleaf, including 'Roger[Fry], Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] and Desmond [MacCarthy]'; list of autobiographical topics written around it and on the inside cover.

Notebook with translations and other works by R. C. Trevelyan

Prose note on 'religious and aesthetic emotions'. Verse, 'This love disease is a delicious/delightful trouble'. Translations by Trevelyan of the "Homeric Hymn to Demeter", fragments from tragedies by Sophocles, Euripides, and Aeschylus, an extract from Virgil ["Aeneid"] Book VI, Leopardi's "To his Lady" and "Canticle of the Wild Cock", Simonides 37, an extract from [Homer's] "Iliad" Book 24. Draft essay on aging and desire. Notes, in the style of Trevelyan's "Simple Pleasures". Autobiographical piece about a reading party at Blackgang Chine almost fifty years ago, with Cambridge friends such as Lytton Strachey, Roger Fry, Desmond MacCarthy and George Moore. Draft of "On Inspiration", published in "Windfalls". Translations of Catullus 2, 7, 12, and 50, Tibullus I.1, and Montaigne III.11 and III.6. Dialogue between 'Child' and 'Father'. Note on Saint Augustine's "Confessions". List of contents for the 1948 "From the Shiffolds" pamphlet. Notes for topic 'What does England mean to me?' and on old age.

Notebook used from other end in: list of books including [Beerbohm's] "Zuleika Dobson" and Ransome's "Great Northern?". Draft letter regarding the [re?] printing of Trevelyan's "Collected Works". Passage headed 'p. 15'; since this is followed by a review of Judson's "Life of Spenser", it may be an extract from that book. List of titles of essays, prefaces for translations, biographical pieces (Donald Tovey and C[lifford] A[llen], etc; perhaps future projects for Trevelyan. Draft piece on poets and poetry. Dialogue on the subject of translating poetry; piece "On Translating Greek Poetry", with notes on individual authors and quotations of passages. Pieces on translating Lucretius and the Greek Anthology; notes on translating Homer and Catullus; observations on a 'friendly critic' pointing out that 'too many' of Trevelyan's poems and essays begin with a scene of someone, usually the poet, 'walking meditatively in a wood' or lying beneath a tree. Translation of Tibullus III.19. Draft essay on Trevelyan's feelings about spiders, insects and other small creatures, and snakes; includes mention of a 'great philosopher' [Bertrand Russell or G. E. Moore?] disliking ants immensely.

Notebook with translations and other works by R. C. Trevelyan

List of books on flyleaf, including [R.G.?] Collingwood's "An autobiography". Autobiographical fragment, including Trevelyan's childhood 'courting' of a girl at dancing class, friendships including two 'of an emotional, romantic kind' at Harrow, and thoughts on Keats's "Ode to a Nightingale". Translations: of first part of Sophocles' "Philoctetes"; the "Homeric Hymns to Pan, Dionysus, Aphrodite and Demeter; fragments of Greek New Comedy by Menander, Alexis and Philemon.

Book used from other end in: draft verse [translation?] on inside cover and flyleaf; list of possible topics under the heading "More Windfalls", including '[George?] Meredith', Reminiscences', '[Donald] Tovey'. Draft piece, "On losing one's bearings". Verse, 'Oh sea and shore, dearer to me than life...'. Ideas for "Less Simple Pleasures" under headings such as 'Literary', "Of Friendship', 'Of Walking'. Essay of pleasures of the senses. particularly touch. Piece about Horace and his friendships, perhaps as introduction for Trevelyan's two fictional dialogues about him, or part of the subsequent discussion of conversation. This mentions Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, Roger Fry and Donald Tovey (Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey are also mentioned but Trevelyan then crosses this out)'; Henry Sidgwick, his father's friend, is mentioned as a 'perfect artist in conversation'. Discussion of philosophical dialogues. Biographical sketch of Thomas Sturge Moore. Piece on aging and desire. Notes on playing chess with Dickinson. Notes on Montaigne. Bertrand Russell and Bernard Shaw. Essay on the self, Buddhism, and change.

Notebook with draft of "The New Parsifal" by R. C. Trevelyan

Also contains notes for Trevelyan's toast to 'Absent Brothers' [at the annual dinner of the Cambridge Apostles], in which he explains that [his brother] George is 'in the Balkans, visiting battlefields' [during the Second Balkan War]; Brooke is in America, and Dickinson in China. Trevelyan suggests that Brooke should instead go to India as '9th reincarnation of Vishnu', play the flute and be followed by 'troops of adoring Gopi maidens. He would make a wonderful God'. If this new religion should prove a nuisance to the government, McTaggart, Russell and Moore should be 'at hand to check and expose him'; they would also find helpful roles in India, as would Fry, Lytton Strachey, George Trevelyan, and Mayor.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

29 Beaufort Street, Chelsea SW. - He and Goldie [Dickinson] start tomorrow to bicycle to Failand: asks whether Trevelyan will be at Welcombe and able to put them up on Saturday night. If Trevelyan is not staying on at Welcombe, asks him to keep away from town for a day or two to give Mrs Smith a holiday, since they have 'played such a Box & Cox game that she hasn't had any as yet'

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Has not heard from Fry for a while: hopes Helen and Julian are well. Description of 'a Julian at the hotel': Julian Cotton of the Indian Civil Service, honeymooning with his Neapolitan wife [neé Gigia Riccardi Arlotta]. Other guests are Kershaw and his friend Perry, an ex-actor; 'the Lapchinski', who luckily only came for a week; and [William] Wyse of Trinity, an Apostle who has been forced by ill health to give up work for a year. Goes every day to the Cimbrone, passing Fry's old studio, and has overheard prayers there as if to 'rid the room of... some devil who has...haunted there since you painted him in your picture of St Antony'. Taking tea today with Mrs Read [sic: Mrs Reid, widow of Francis Nevile Reid of Villa Rufolo]. Bessie is learning Latin and Trevelyan is rewriting the old play 'which sent [Fry] and Helen to sleep once'. Has heard nothing from Johnson about "Polyphemus" and only seen two reviews. Bridges wrote him an appreciative letter, though he did not like the Faun's song or make much of the irregular metres. Will probably stay at Berenson's on the way north; asks if he and Fry might meet around Florence. Fry should read Defoe's "Moll Flanders", which is the best novel in English. Bessie is now reading "Robinson Crusoe" to him as a 'shaving book', which is also excellent.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, prov. di Salerno. - Explains how the rumour of Fry's death [see also 4/46 and 4/47] spread: it originated from [William] Sharp who told the Grandmonts at Taormina that he had seen an obituary; they then wrote to Helen [Fry], and to Bessie who wired to the Enticknaps who replied this morning that the Frys were both well, and only then told Trevelyan. Hopes the obituary was not that of Fry's brother, cousin [Lewis George Fry] the painter or any other near relation. Has finished the first act of his new play, on a mediaeval theme. His "Cecilia Gonzaga" is coming out in a month or two. Johnson has been bothering him over the £10 Trevelyan would not pay [for printing “Polyphemus and Other Poems”], claiming it is Fry's fee, which Trevelyan does not think has been paid. Does not want to quarrel with Johnson as he has the remainder of the edition but thinks he is trying to swindle them. Asks whether the Frys have changed houses; also whether he has done anything on their Claude, whether the Bellinis [works by Jacopo Bellini discovered by Fry in Venice which he hoped would be bought by the National Gallery] will come, and about 'the Cosimo and your petition to the Balfours'. News from Ravello about ‘the Kershaw’, Madam Palumbo, Tufti, Francesca and Mrs Reid. Fry’s portrait of ‘Old Pal. [Pasquale Palumbo]’ is much treasured by Madam Palumbo. They are reading [Richardson's] "Clarissa". Going to Palermo in about a month, and hope to see Lina. Berenson is in good humour with Fry; Trevelyan has been correcting some of his proofs.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Rocca Bella, Taormina. - has heard the news of the Frys' move to Hampstead from Mrs Enticknap; it is very sad, but hopes they will soon forget Dorking. Will be back in England by Easter to be at [G.E.] Moore's Easter party, which he thinks is to be in the New Forest. Asks Fry if he could come, and persuade Goldie [Dickinson] to come also; has written to [Bertrand] Russell to suggest his coming. Will go to the Berensons next week. Saw a great deal of the Waterfields at Palermo and has got to like [Aubrey] Waterfield very much; wishes Fry could appreciate him more, as Berenson now seems to. Must see Fry as soon as possible as he must settle with Johnson [publisher of Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"].

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