Showing 245 results

Archival description
Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick
Print preview View:

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Whittingehame, A. Balfour's house in Lothian]:- He and Nora were very busy up to the end of the previous year, until they escaped to Prestonkirk on New Year's Eve. They arrived in Cambridge on 26 December, on Thursday morning they were completing their arrangements for the Conference of Schoolmistresses on the following day, and their friends arrived that evening 'and educational talk began lasting without intermission till Friday evening...' On Saturday he began to prepare his answers for the Cambridge University Commissioners, and finished them on Monday morning, before his journey to Scotland.

Reports on the conference itself, which 'made up a compact and business-like meeting at the Townhall.' States that he was impressed with the schoolmistresses, who 'said what they had to say in a clear, short, practical way'. They 'fixed a limit of ten minutes for the speeches, but the only speaker who showed the least desire to exceed it was a Man..' Mentions that among the speeches made was one by Professor John Mayor. A short paragraph about the conference was sent to the newspapers, and got into the Times. Among those who came were James Wilson from Rugby with his sister Annie, who is head of a school at Grantham; Annie Marshall from Leeds, Professor Green from Oxford 'with his professorial honours fresh upon him', and Eve 'who used to be at Wellington College. States that Arthur was not able to come because Charlotte was not well enough to be left.

Reports that they have 'delightful weather' there in Prestonkirk, and that his brothers-in-law are all assembled. Claims that he has got the burden of his article pretty much off his mind. Describes the 'lovely winter view' from his window. Sends on Nora's love. Adds that they did not hear any political secrets at Hatfield, but reports that Myers, whom they had seen in London 'had seen Dizzy at Windsor Castle and reports that he bore a remarkably swaggering and triumphant aspect', and they are afraid that 'that Hebrew has been brewing some ill for his step-native land!'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he and Nora have now got their affairs regarding 'the Education of Women' into order for the term. Has much to do, as he is to lecture on Shakespeare, Bacon, and perhaps Milton in addition to his usual work. Reports that when they left her the previous Monday week, they saw Worcester Cathedral, the restoration of which he 'did not much admire', and then went on to Cheltenham, where they went skating. States that they had a pleasant week at Cheltenham, and that he believes that Mrs Myers [mother of Frederick Myers] health is worse than it was; she 'was much interested about fighting the corporation of Manchester who are trying to turn Thirlmere Lake into a big ugly reservoir for Lancashire towns.'

They had a very pleasant night at Rugby [with the Arthur Sidgwicks]. Declares that Rose [his niece] is 'a charming creature', and reports that the other baby [Ethel, just over a month old] was 'thoughtfully kept out of [his] sight'. '[Jex]-Blake has raised nearly £10,000 for buildings at Rugby', such as an observatory and library, which Henry says 'shows great energy in dignified mendacity'; he himself has donated thirty pounds. They then spent a couple of nights with the Rayleighs, and then went home. Reports that [his cousin] Alfred Sidgwick has sent him another essay, 'which is also not bad'. Hopes that the weather has not troubled her, and reports that they found their 'ill-built house very cold' when they got back to it. Sends on Nora's love.

Letter from Isabel Sidgwick to Eleanor Sidgwick, with Henry Sidgwick's wedding buttonhole flower

Looks forward to seeing her on 4 May. Refers to 'a precious little packet' which she found among their mother-in law's papers, and which she now encloses [included]. Reports that she has just heard from the Rector of Lincoln College that [her son] Nevil is elected to an official Fellowship there. States that Lincoln wishes to attract scientific students, and Nevil will be allowed to take other pupils so long as there is not work enough in the college itself. He does not go into residence until October, and expects to have finished at Töbingen before summer. Wishes that she could have helped Eleanor in the arrangement of the letters, and states that she left all the envelopes that existed, and dated many of the letters. Claims that she can find none written by Henry to William 'that are not merely [ ] announcements, or engagements.' Reports that the weather is very cold, and that her roses were very poor.

With envelope [193/2], and dried flower [193/3], wrapped in piece of paper [193/4] labelled 'Orange flower and leaf taken from HS's button hole by M[ary] B[enson] on his wedding day 4 April 1876'.

Sidgwick, Sarah Isabella (1832-1918) wife of William Carr Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to send the enclosed [introductions] [not included] to William. States that he acquired them from an acquaintance of his [Lewes]'who on Wednesday morning was totally ignorant of W's existence', and who had been mistaken for Henry by a lady, who congratulated him on his brother's marriage [to Isabel]. Having 'conceived immediately a lively interest in W. and hearing that he was gone to Sicily offered [Henry] the introduction to Signor Th[ ]', which Henry 'had not the heart to refuse'. He also received an introduction to Signor Salinas, [Professor of Archaeology at Palermo]. Asks her to write when her plans about going to Exeter are settled.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he is spending 'some pleasant days' [in Wimborne] with the Pauls, and announces that he intends to go to Freshwater on Tuesday or Wednesday, where he expects to meet Symonds, and to stay there until Saturday, and then return to Cambridge. Regrets that she cannot come there, and undertakes to go down to Rugby 'for a Sunday.' Asks her to tell W[illiam] that he will send the twenty francs 'in any way that he likes.' Is certain that 'the introductions [see 99/194] will bore' William, but explains that he could not refuse them; suggests that William 'may like to see the archaeologist at Palermo [Antonino Salinas]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Is sorry that she takes 'so gloomy a view of [his sister] Mary's state.' Agrees that her mental state is unusual. Asks when the school reopens, and states that he would be very glad to come to Rugby for a night or two; suggests that he could come at the same time as William and Isabel. Asks her to tell Annie Sidgwick, or his aunt Mary Jane, 'that she could not possibly get more than a 3rd class according to [their] regulations'. Is glad to hear of [E.A.] Scott's reinstatement. Mentions that it has not taken place yet, but does not suppose that 'H. H[ayman]' can gain anything by interposing obstacles now.' Remarks that the latter appears to have got into very strained relations with the Board, and speculates as to Hayman's possible tactics in the matter. Concludes that 'if Rugby can once get rid of him, it does not matter much what he says'. Sends his love to [Mary's] children.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he left William the previous day, and that William went walking over Dale Head to Buttermere, and intends to stay in the Lakes for a while. Henry believes that he seems quite well, and that if he could be persuaded to undertake some regular work, 'and abstain from excitement, he would be as well as many hardworking men are during great parts of their lives'. Reports that Mrs F. Ward [wife of his aunt Mary Jane's brother Francis Ridout Ward?] and her daughter are there [at his uncle Robert's house, The Raikes]. Announces that he is going to Adel on Wednesday, and is now setting off to call on his [Sidgwick?] uncles. Remarks that Mr Bal[me? ] seemed really pleased to talk to William, and states that the island folk also were very friendly and hospitable. Announces that he shall come back on Saturday.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he heard about Rugby the previous day: that H[enry] H[ayman] 'will stay until something else happens.' Supposes that 'there has been a hard fight on the Board'. Wonders whether any will leave because of this crisis. States that he has asked A[rthur] to tell him what is the actual decline of the school. Admits to believing sometimes 'that things have come now to such a pass that everyone had better do just what he feels inclined to do - stay or go...' Predicts that there will be 'no joy of harmonious work or prosperity at Rugby for some time...unless the decline comes much faster than one anticipates.' Asks her to tell Mary that he will write to her, and that he is much obliged for her letter. Warns against compulsory idleness, and advises that Mary be made to feel as little an invalid as possible. Hopes to see William on 22 [March].

Brown envelope with notes

With MS notes, including 'Chiefly about Nora's engagement and wedding and some written afterwards and some letters of mine to her'. Accompanying 105/1-19.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Sidgwick.

Refers to the news [of her impending marriage to Edward White Benson], and explains that he has not spoken to her on the subject because 'it was Mamma's particular wish that it should not be spoken of.' Speaks of the delight he felt when he first heard of it, and of how the news seemed to him 'like the sudden realization of a fairy dream...' Speaks of his admiration for Edward, and of how the latter has almost become a part of their family. Tells her that they shall all miss her very much, and that he shall miss her especially, as his recent illness has taught him to be less selfish. Admits that they cannot grudge her to Edward, 'lonely as he must feel now after the life at Rugby...' Looks forward to the visits that he shall pay her. Prays for God's blessing to be upon herself and Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for the cheque for £10, and undertakes to do his best with regard to the circulars. Reports that he has gone through just half of his examinations 'perhaps as well as [he] expected altogether; better in the Mathematics so far, but a miserable failure in the "Cram" '. As to the latter states that E.W. Benson will explain. Doubts his chances of being first, and complains that he is 'doomed to golden mediocrity.' Regrets that the photograph 'did not please'. States that Edward will see in the Times of the following day that Holmes has won the Porson Prize, and comments that 'the Johnians have got everything this year which will grieve his patriotic heart.' Sends thanks to Minnie for her letter.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Eton]:- Comments that it is very odd that he has received no books, and hopes that she has not forwarded any to [Roden] Noel's, whom he had left the previous Monday. Reports that he has been staying at Eton since Tuesday, and is going to Oxford the following Monday, until Wednesday. States that Arthur's degree is to come out on the Friday following. Asks if she has anyone staying with her. He was in London for one night, and went by the Metropolitan Railway [opened on 10 January 1863] on Monday: it is 'really most impressive - more so than any other "wonder of the age" [he has] ever seen'; it should be a 'great success', and there is 'no disagreeable smell'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Urges her to come to Cambridge, and asks her to tell him what train she may be getting. Tells her that he has got lodgings for her that are 'poky and mean', but that they were the best he could find. Reports that Cambridge is emptying now quicker than he had foreseen. States that his hay fever is not bad, and that he is looking forward to her visit.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Supposes that she has been very busy, entertaining his aunt [Henrietta?]; otherwise she would have written to him. Reports that he has seen William, who tells him that she 'is going to live in the "house that Jack built" after all.' Predicts that it will turn out excellent. Asks her 'how every one at Rugby takes Joe Blake's election.' Admits that he should have preferred Percival, but that he gave Blake a testimonial, and believes that the school ought to succeed under him. Reports that he has seen Charles Bowen, 'who says that Hayman's case...is ridiculous: and that every lawyer says so.' Asks her to tell him if she has good news of Arthur, and to send him the latter's address. Wishes him to examine in Greek history for the Indian Civil Service at Easter.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he shall not see Myers. Announces that he is probably to leave the Lakes on 1 September. Reports on the weather, and relates that they lunched 'on the Island' and saw some cousins [of Myers], 'especially Miss Theodosia', who quite impressed Sidgwick's mother. States that [G.O] Trevelyan is in Penrith, and that he is to be married in a month. Reports that Arthur 'is very exultant in Norway', and that he himself is to go to Cambridge 'to make ready the Batting against [Myers'] Bowling in November'. Hopes to see the latter then. Is unsure as to where he shall be living.] Reports that it is likely that he will get C.H. Pearson 'to lecture on History in Trin. Coll.' Asks if Myers liked Mrs Kitchener; declares that she is 'at Rugby somewhat of a symbol or a Banner.' Note [in Myers' hand]: 'I examined for the Moral Science Tripos in Nov/69. HS coached men for [ ]'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces his engagement to Eleanor Balfour. Warns her that no one else is to be told. States that it is 'very wonderful and unexpected happiness.' Wishes to go down to his mother from London on Thursday afternoon, when he intends to tell her about his fiancée, and 'about the need of concealment.' Adds that even Mary must not know 'just yet'; he intends to tell her as soon as he can.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Claims that their secret [his engagement to Eleanor Balfour] is now so widely known that she may tell 'any one who is really interested in [him]', including the Greens. Announces that he shall be in London on Monday, and asks her when she shall be there. Hopes that she feels more comfortable about her teeth. States that his and his intended wife's plans are not yet quite settled, and he does not know whether or for how long he shall be in London during the following month. Undertakes to write again as soon as he has seen Eleanor, who is to return from Paris on the following Monday.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he is in the midst of scenery [in Carnarvon], 'which is not first-rate but very pleasing...', and comments on its similarity to the Lakes. Predicts that he shall enjoy himself much, as they have 'much exhilarating good fellowship and good talk at breakfast and in the evening: George Trevelyan, especially, being a well-spring of both.' States that he intends to be there for at least a week, returning to London probably early in September. Claims that he is behind with his work, and thinks that when the holiday is over, he shall have to work hard on till Christmas.

Asks her to thank their mother for her letter [101/176], which he intends to answer soon. Refers to [his cousin] Annie's remark as 'discriminative', and explains that the reason he chose to comment on 'that particular essay of Arnold's was not because it was the most impudent, but because it seemed the most complete and decisive enumeration of his theory of life.' States that he was glad to get Arthur's address, but does not think he will be sending a letter to him in Switzerland. Is glad to hear of her progress. Encloses 'a little poem' [not included], which he cut out of a magazine, and also 'a German effusion' of his [not included]. Advises her to get hold of Rückert's Selected works if she ever feels inclined to break new ground in German poetry. [Incomplete?]

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he has been in Cambridge for a few days, but has not yet begun to work. Arthur is 'quite satisfied' with his degree, but many are disappointed. Enjoyed his visit to Oxford and declares that William's rooms are 'magnificent'. Conington introduced him 'to one of the "stars" of Oxford - Professor Henry Smith', who is 'a wonderful converser'. Saw Mr Martin that morning, who was looking very ill, and '[George or John?] Paget gives a bad account of him.'

Glad to hear about Katie Lace [his cousin, engaged to be married to the Rev. J. D. Wawn]. Remarks that the clergy of the Church of England 'generally perform their duty to Society in the way of matrimony if in no other way.' Announces that he begins lecturing the following day, and that there are 'piles of portmanteaus at the Porter's lodge just now.' Says that he has been reading 'A Woman's Thoughts about Women [by Dinah Mulock]', and that it seems to him 'more practical and vigorous tho' less refined than Miss [Anne] Browns books.' Asks if he left a racquet at Rugby.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Gratefully acknowledges receipt of her long letter [101/157]. Regrets to hear that his uncle Christopher [Sidgwick?] is going to law. In relation to ' "Colenso" ', does not expect his uncle 'to be converted to more liberal views at his time of life.' Believes that a crisis is coming on again in the Church of England, 'much like that of the Tractarians.' Discusses Colenso's book [The Pentateuch and Book of Joshua Critically Examined] in relation to the impending crisis. Regrets that no one has reviewed Miss [Anne] Brown's book. Wishes to cut his connection with the press, as it interferes with his study and does not improve his style. Declares that 'the Problems [in Human Nature' is not the kind of book he would like to write about. Undertakes to send Miss Brown 'Coventry [Patmore]'.

Confirms that he has read the Chronicles of Carlingford by Margaret Oliphant, part of which he compares with George Eliot, 'and one cannot give it higher praise, but the melodramatic element a little spoils it'. Wishes to hear his mother's views 'about Hymen [god of marriage] and the facilities for serving them', and asks if she thinks women are annoyed by the social restraints as much as men, since 'it does not appear in their books.' Says that he would like the American freedom, but doesn't suppose that she would. Discusses relations between men and women in America, compared to those in England. Declares that he is much obliged for Miss Brown's 'good opinion of [his] humble efforts'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Paris]:- Gives an account of a wedding he attended recently. Refers to Roden Noel, whom he met in the Louvre. Claims to be enjoying Paris very much, and likes the Tuileries and the Champs Elysées 'as much as ever.' Admits not to be attracted by France as much as by Germany, and gives his impressions of Paris and of the French people. Thinks that he will leave Paris 'on Monday week', but may stay a day or two longer. Reports that Arthur is to leave on Thursday. Hopes that William is recovered from his attack.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Declares that he has been very successful in life since [their] 'brief and transitory yet happy...interview terminated at the Royal Academy', despite his pecuniary losses; thinks 'a large family on £300 a year' is the only thing which could make him 'properly thrifty'.

Is anxious to hear what she thinks of Elaine and [another painting at the Summer Exhibition?] Says that their mother had hinted that she was too much overcome with the heat to enjoy anything, and he hopes that Minnie and Miss Hadley 'strongly impressed on her the advantages that would arise from [Turkish Baths].' Claims that he found the Academy 'once almost as good as a T.B....' Refers to his mother's possible move to Cambridge, which he claims he urged on her as strongly as he felt he ought, but reports that she thinks that he is as yet not settled enough. Wishes that he had 'a kindred spirit still left at Cambridge', since all his friends are now 'wasting their sweetness as schoolmasters' and he visits them 'with a strange mixture of envy and regret for their sakes'; but claims that he is very happy there with his books. Reports that he read Macaulay and Mill alternately, and also reads geography. Announces that he is going to study geology during the summer. Asks her to send him the papers that J. Conington sent him if Arthur has left them at Wellington College. Wishes also toknow all her plans, and sends greetings to Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he is well, 'pretty happy, and working very hard'. Gives an account of how he spends his day, including playing croquet after the afternoon meal. Reports that he is 'reading nothing but Arabic and lectures', and is lecturing on the Acts of the Apostles. Comments on the Times's treatment of Church extension. Mentions that he saw his and Arthur's old friend Festing that day, and they 'fraternized on the subject'. Enjoins her to read Gladstone's speech [advocating the imposition of income tax on Charities], saying 'never was he more splendide mendax, which Arthur will translate'. Reports that George [Gilbert?] Ramsay has written to ask him for a testimonial; asks her to ask Arthur to write 'something flowery about him'. Believes that Ramsay would be 'a good man for the Bear-Garden that a Scotch-lectureroom is said to be.' Fears that the Longsden-Warne job 'will be nipped in the bud.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter and gift [a birthday present]. Declares that he has now passed 'what is said to be the dangerous age (as regards imprudent marriage)'. Considers staying in Cambridge during the Long Vacation, and says that the idea that it is 'insalubrious' in the summer is 'a complete delusion'. Reports that he went to London on Wednesday to a dinner party, and had a very serious attack of hay fever. Since 'a tolerably severe examination is near at hand, fears that he cannot come to see her as he had hoped to do that month. Reports that the living of Whitkirk has not yet been disposed of , but has heard that 'a late scholar of the college has just married on his curacy', and fears that his claims will be considered strong especially as he always went to morning chapel.' Expresses his surprise at the fact that Bob Mayor 'is going'. Asks if she has heard that Joseph Mayor is a candidate for the Professorship of political economy at Trinity College. Does not believe that he is the best man for the job, and states that he shall have to vote against him. Reports that he has just had three quarters of an hour 'at the Academy', and comments that he cannot conceive of 'anyone except a painter admiring the ghastly [Eve of] St Agnes', but states that the other two by Millais are 'wonderfully well-painted', though he wonders at the artist's choice of 'such trivial subjects.': 'There used to be some poetry in him: where is it gone to? His inspiration now seems about the level of Mrs Henry Wood's novels'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Inquires as to the plans of his family for the Long Vacation. Asks when she will be at Rugby and when she shall go to Wellington College. States that he still intends to stay in Cambridge, despite the reaction of his friends to his decision. Reports that the climate agrees with him, and that he 'revel[s] in Leisure'. Predicts that if he does not over-eat his health will be all right. Reports that he has got half-way through the irregular verbs of Hebrew. States that he wished to make the acquaintance of one or two undergraduates who will be more accessible in the Vacation than in term-time. Intends to leave his rooms for three weeks 'in order to avoid coming down with a [ ]'. Claims to have no particular predilection as to when he should go to see his mother, and wishes to know her plans. Reports that he is to examine at Wellington College sometime in July and intends to spend a week with Tawney sometime in August.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks his mother to forward a letter to Miss [Anne?] Brown, whose letter he has mislaid. Declares that he has fixed to come and spend September with her. Wishes to read, and thinks he shall spend August in Cambridge. Reports that he is getting on with Hebrew but very slowly. Predicts that he shall have read through I Samuel by the time he goes to Wellington College the following week. He intends to visit [C. H.?] Tawney after his exam there. Announces that he will pay his mother a morning call. Reports that the [Charles?] Bernards are living in Glamorganshire. Remarks that the Jews were a 'splendid people', but that the more he reads about them the more averse he becomes to the 'Bibliolatry of the day.' Observes that his is a disagreeable age in which to live; 'there are so many opinions held about everything and the advocates of each abuse their opponents so virulently that it quite frightens a modest man.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that 'the watch spoken of by the prophet would be highly acceptable', but that his mother 'has other ideas' [for a wedding present]. Supposes that Myers is coming to Cambridge, and informs him of his movements over the next week or so. Reports that they have not yet got over the shock of Lord Salisbury's speech [introducing a Bill to set up a commission to reorganise the colleges and university of Oxford along lines favoured by Sidgwick and other Cambridge Liberals], and suggests that the latter does not know what academic conservatism is, or does not care; perhaps 'Oxford Conservatives are unlike Cambridge ones.' Has 'nothing to do but suppress [his] exultation and see what turns up'. Announces that Arthur Balfour 'is expected daily now'. Reports that Nora is staying that night with the Marquis [of Salisbury], but Sidgwick is afraid that 'he won't talk to her about University Reform'. Hopes that Myers' brother [Arthur?] 'is still convalescing'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that 'Dr S[lade?] came to C[arlton] G[ardens] wrote on a closed double slate, and on one that [Sidgwick] partly held: but did not in either case keep the slate in sight the whole time after [Sidgwick] had looked at it.' States that other people 'seem to have had much better things', and refers to Serjeant Cox, St. G[eorge] M[ivart] and Hutton. Relates that he and others persuaded Dr Slade 'half to promise to come to [Cambridge] in October', but doubts that he will come.

Announces that he means to stay [in Beauly] until the end of the month. Refers to his mother's illness, and says that they shall probably go to Oxford in September to take care of her. States that he does not intend to let Slade go 'without wringing evidence out of him.' Reports that Miss Fairlamb 'has been having something good in N[ewcastle]: materialization [of being] outside the cabinet', and announces that he would like to stay a night or two there if possible. Reports that they are 'having splendid days' [in Beauly]. Wishes Myers 'all success in Cambridge'. Reports also that Miss Anderson was impressed by Slade, 'and could not conceive how it was done.' States that the weak point of Slade is that he won't try two slates screwed together, which George Darwin invited him to do. Remarks that [Con], C.C. [Massey], [Moses] and Myers 'form a strong phalanx.' Reports that Carpenter has been and says he can't explain it, and wants Slade to come to a meeting of the British Association. Adds that John Holland saw him there.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends to come down the following week, leaving Cambridge on the Wednesday, probably spending a day with Roden Noel, and arriving home in or around Friday, or on Wednesday if the visit to Noel falls through. Does not feel that there is 'the least need that Arthur should try for a fellowship now'; he has discussed the matter with Lightfoot. Reports that he is still reading Hebrew, and has just finished Deuteronomy. Intends to continue reading when he goes home.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Discusses when he might come home, as he cannot decide on whether he should come a week hence or later. Tells her not to take him into account when filling the house, but asks her to let him know on Thursday or Friday whether his room is vacant or not. States that he will come on 24 December at the latest. States that although he is well read in Pneumatological Literature, he has not heard of the book mentioned by her, but undertakes to look for it in the University Library.

Results 121 to 150 of 245