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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Addressed to Julian at 7 Villa Brune, Paris XIVᵉ, France. - Has ordered a copy of Roger [Fry's] book ["Characteristics of] French Art" to be sent to Julian. Will arrive at Paris Gard [sic: Gare] du N[ord] at 18.10 on Monday; if Julian does not have time to meet him at the station, he could come to find him at the [Hotel de] Londres.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Addressed to Julian at 7 Villa Brune, Paris XIVe, France; forwarded to him c/o Thos Cook, Cannabière [sic: Canebière], Marseille. - Roger Fry has written to him from Hotel Récamier​, Paris; does not know whether he is still there, or whether Julian is in Paris, but if so he might like to look him up. Is reading Madame [Maria] Germanova's 'article to the 19th Century', which is 'rather a forlorn hope'; the "English Review" refused it. Bessie will probably go to the Netherlands on Sunday, having put her journey off due to a cold from which she seems to have recovered now.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Very relieved to get Bob's letter of the 31st December last night; amused that Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] wrote three enthusiastic letters on Christmas Day, to Bob, Bessie, and Bramine [Hubrecht] and that they have all ended up in her hands; 'the dog's story' in Bob's letter very good. Would like Bob to call her 'Florence' as she asks, though she herself will never be able to think of her by that name; the letters show how kind she is 'though she comes it up so queenly in ordinary life'. Has had nice letter from Bramine, who was amused by Bob addressing her formally as 'Mrs Grandmont'; Bramine says Grandmont has not yet promised they will be in the Hague for June [the wedding] but she is sure everything will come right; Grandmont never will commit to future plans. Returns to the letter in the evening saying how tired she is, by nursing her aunt and running the household, but also because her uncle is 'so nervous these last days' and it is 'utterly exhausting to be in the house with him'. He is worried about her aunt's illness, and they have just had a letter dictated by Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht], in bed with influenza in Florence, to a nurse; Bramine is now with her.

Writes the next morning that things seem more cheerful; her aunt had a 'coughing night' but is slightly better. Had a nice letter from Bob's aunt [Anna Maria] Philips yesterday, thanking her for sending her photographs. Will look forward to seeing Bob's letter in the "Manchester Guardian"; the Salomonsons take it so she will ask her [friend Jeanne Salomonson Asser] to look out for it]. Has done hardly any reading, and no practising, for a week. At a concert on Wednesday night, heard some music by Rameau 'like delicate lace-work', then Ysaÿe playing a Bach concerto. His 'rendering was very modernised', which would have disgusted the Frys; she too much preferred a modern piece by Lalo, 'quite perfect in its way'. Hopes to go tonight to another chamber music recital, and tomorrow Lamond is performing a Beethoven sonata she would also like to hear. Her cousin Louise Hubrecht has sent her an "Inquirer" with a review of George [Macauley Trevelyan]'s book ["England in the Age of Wycliffe"] which she looks forward to reading, since she will not have time to finish the book itself before February. Is very glad that Bob is pleased with his work so far and feels 'her nine rivals' [the Muses] have him 'in their blessed power'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

He and Helen did not make it to the sea due to heat, but got to Petworth and had a 'divine evening' in the Park; went on to Fittleworth and slept at a good inn [probably the Swan] where they saw Edmund Garrett's 'effusions' and drawings by J. Badley in the visitors' book. They have been to Agnews [Thomas Agnew & Sons, Old Bond Street, to see an exhibition of twenty Italian masters]; Agnew is 'utterly commercial but quite pleasant'. Discusses the authenticity of the pictures: thinks Trevelyan is wrong and the Raphael portrait is genuine. Asks Trevelyan to visit and meet Mrs Grammont [sic: Bramine Hubrecht, painter, wife of Alphonse Grandmont].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Lewes Ho[use], Lewes. - Has been to Paris about a Renoir ["Madame Charpentier et ses enfants"] which he has succeeded in purchasing for the [Metropolitan] Museum, which 'is quite secret'. This is the only time he has left Helen, who 'wants someone to walk with her all day', but hopes to get away for a few days and to 'look at the various houses'. Their own landlord is to turn them out at Christmas so they must find something, and it is 'evident that H[elen] ought to be in the country'. Encourages Bob to read Ferrero's "La Grandeur et Décadence du Rome", though he has the London Library's copy at the moment. Adds in a postscript that he is up for election at the Reform Club on 18 Apr; asks Bob to mention this to his father.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

The Grafton Galleries, Ltd., 8, Grafton Street, W. - Did discuss R.'s [Roger Fry's] answer to Sargent, but did not read it; recommended corrections, which perhaps will be made; did not know Trevelyan was worried it might not be 'in the right key'. Wishes he had heard Moore on 'Time' and imagines the interruptions; asks where 'the working men' were last night.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt. - Apologises for the delay in writing: Helen wanted to address a poem to Trevelyan about his flowers though Fry has warned her Melodie Dolmetsch [sic: Elodie, Arnold Dolmetsch's second wife] had no success that way. Thinks they will not visit till the end of the month. Is reading Balzac. His portrait of the 'O.B.' [Oscar Browning] got very like but he has made him 'a little sanctimonious': thinks he will be able to put this right, but doubts whether he is good at likeness or character. The proofs [of his book on Giovanni Bellini] have gone; mocks himself for his Gallicisms. Offers to talk to White regarding the disagreement over Trevelyan's taking a lease on a house: thinks it would be best to insist the lease is terminable in case of building. Doodle of Pegasus. A line in Helen Fry's hand should introduce a poem, but nothing follows: incomplete letter?

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Postmarked Guildford. - Thanks Bob for the cheque; had sent off the pipe. Has sent the drawing to be mounted. Will write to D.T. [Donald Tovey?] tomorrow, is also 'not sanguine, but its worth the shot'. Ricketts has resigned from the Burlington Consulting Committee because Fry has become editor of the "Magazine"; will try to persuade him to change his mind: 'not that he's important but I have a foolish liking for him'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Message left in case MacCarthy is out when Trevelyan calls: if Trevelyan does not fetch this [an unknown item], he will have it sent to the Mill House. His mission was not very successful. His mother returns tomorrow. Is going to Eton tonight. Thinks he must stay a few days with his mother, as he has not seen her for weeks; Trevelyan should expect him on Tuesday. Has got D'Annunzio and will bring it; checks whether Trevelyan took 'Sophy K'. Asks if the news about seeing [Roger] Fry means that his wife is ill again.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St (on headed notepaper for National Liberal Club, Whitehall Place, S.W.). - Called on Edward's mother this afternoon since he has been ordered to go abroad by his doctor; when he said that he was probably going to a village 'in the hills near Paestum to spend a month or two by himself', Mrs Marsh 'immediately decided' that Edward should go with him; says he said it was a long journey to take for a stay of three weeks, and that if Edward had wanted to go he would have proposed it himself; did not mention that a long stay alone 'with an individual who has theories on the state of the English language which... are tedious when repeated overmuch' would be tedious for him. Does say, though that he could 'conceive [of] nothing more delightful' than for Edward to come; he would be working much of the time, and hopes his temper would be better; would not go to see places except for Pompeii and Paestum which are near, but that would not stop Edward 'playing the giddy dog at Naples or Rome or M[onte] Carlo' as much as he liked. Is going to a village called Corpo di Cava recommended by Roger Fry, who has spent time painting there. Leaving on Tuesday; Mrs Marsh says that Edward could not leave until Wednesday, and he could wait till then or meet him in Paris, but cannot wait longer as he wants 'to get out of this damned fog'; tells Marsh to telegraph if he wants to come. Will 'accept any reasonable modification of place' but it must be 'hot and quiet'. Found Marsh's sister playing children's games with the Sunday school children; she was 'quite exhausted, and the canary was carried into the drawing room in a fit'. Tells Edward that if he saw Bob's last letter to his brother, he should read ' [John Frederick?] Dobson' for 'Drummond'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Durbins, Guildford. - Fate, 'though not in an unkind way', seems against him getting his expedition; has just had a commission for a ceiling painting for Sir A[ndrew] Noble's place in Scotland [Ardkinglas] and needed to visit; the project will keep him busy for the latter part of June, so he expects only to get away to Munich at the end of May for 'the Mahommedan Exhibition' ["Meisterwerke muhammedanischer Kunst", reviewed by Fry in the "Burlington Magazine" Aug, Sept 1910]. The death of the King [Edward VII] also 'interferes' since [Lionel] Cust is taken up with court duties and the "Burlington [Magazine]" rests almost wholly on Fry. Does not think he can undertake a bicycle tour; will probably return from Munich via Bale [Basel], Troyes, Provins and Paris, spending about six days. Would love it if Bob joined him, say at Bale 'to see the Holbeins', but does not think it wourth his while. Hope [Bob's son] Julian is prospering; might come over on Sunday.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hotel Prinz Heinrich, Dorothea Strasse, Berlin. - He and Helen have just returned from an excellent concert: Beethoven and Mozart. Describes their stay at Ede with the family of Trevelyan's friend Elizabeth van der Hoeven [soon to become his fiancée]: they liked the 'old people' very much - the old man [Paul François Hubrecht] reminded Fry of Mr Behrens; gives his impression of Elizabeth who was 'rather shy and inaccessible'. A sister [Maria Hubrecht?] of Madame Grandmont was also there: the Frys thought her paintings (canvas painted to look like tapestry) were dreadful. M. [Alphonse] Grandmont read some of his French translation of Browning's "Pippa Passes"; thinks Trevelyan is wrong about him and that he has more artistic sensibility than his wife, whose 'Ruskinian idealism' has 'deadened her sensations' and who follows the modern trend Fry deplores of always looking for 'meanings & messages' in art. Heard the Biebers [sic: a work by Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber]: Elizabeth is 'most accomplished' but the piece was too modernized; and Handel. Came to Berlin yesterday and the art collection is splendid; comment on German taste.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Mons Martius, Corpo di Cava. - Starts this letter on top of 'an extinct volcano' he has named 'Mons Martius' in Marsh's honour; had meant to finish it here, but the mountain is 'at such an unclimable angle' and there are 'such interesting insects' in the trees that he will have to finish it in the valley. Has given the mountain Marsh's name as some consolation for him 'being unable to come to a place which is without exaggeration the most perfect place in the world'. Describes a local monastery [La Trinità della Cava] with 'a very valuable library', a school for young Italian aristocrats, a 'fair picture gallery' and a church with an organ 'said to be one of the best in Italy'. Bob goes to the abbey, takes out a 'huge Dante' from the library, and is given a cell 'overlooking a precipice, with a waterfall' in which to work, though he usually employs the Dante as a 'mask' to do his own work. Some days he works or reads outdoors; the hills, all volcanic craters, take 'about half an hours easy climbing', and give 'splendid' views from the top. He finds the monks 'very pleasant' though conversation 'in the hash of Italian Latin and French' which they have to use is 'rather difficult'. The pension where he currently the only guest is 'enormous'; the people are nice, but cannot speak French, except for the waiter Celafino. Fortunate that he is 'a good sort, and quite well educated', as he is 'the only person' with whom Bob can have anything like a conversation; he is a protestant, 'converted by an evangelical English household at Naples', so Bob 'pretend[s] to be a zealous churchman' and they both 'laugh at the priests and their fooleries'.

Supposes Marsh is in London now; asks him to write and say if there is anything new 'in the way of theatres, books etc'. When he left, everyone was reading Max Nordau's "Degeneracy", though 'swearing at him' as they read it; they 'recognise most of the moods and symptoms as parts of their own personality and like to see their minds disected [sic] and analysed though they quarrel with him when he tells them that they are hopeless cases'. He himself thinks the book is 'supremely absurd, though fascinatingly interesting, and cleverly written'. 'Poor Roger Fry has been quite conquered by it' and is persuaded he is 'a mattoid and a circulair and a hundred other things'; Marsh should go to see Fry's latest portraits, especially the one of 'Miss [Sybil] Palgrave which is in a new and more ambitious style'. Has heard that [Robert?] Kitson was in Rome, and has written to invite him for a few days, but does not know if he is still there and only has poste restante to write to. Asks Marsh, if he knows Kitson's address, to drop him a line. Feels that he should 'not be living alone in such an Eden without someone else to share'; would end up praying to God 'as Adam di, for a help meet, and would willingly sacrifice a rib or two' to have a 'sufficiently charming Eve' to talk English to. Hopes Marsh and family are well. Postscript with address: Hotel Scapolatielli, Corpo di Cava, Italia.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St. - Bob's 'old woman' [housekeeper] told him when he returned [from Italy?] that a 'young man in a cab with a portmanteau' called when he was away; seems that Edward 'appeared at no 14 [home of Crompton and Theodore Llewelyn Davies] hunting for a lunch'; hopes he found 'a friend or restaurant in time' as he knows his friend needs 'constant supplies... to stave off dissolution', like moles which cannot go without worms for more than twelve hors. Went round to Bruton Street yesterday, but found that Edward had gone back on Sunday; this means he missed meeting 'a rose of Shiraz, the direct descendant of the one which intoxicated Hafiz... You would have had this rose, had you been here' but instead Bob 'took it round to [Roger] Fry, who fell violently in love with it, and fell to painting it' [this appears to refer to the first meeting between Fry and his future wife Helen Coombe]. Supposes Edward is caught up in 'the last act' of his academical careers [final exams]; he should not be 'despondent and doubtful'. Tells Edward to excuse his 'sermons', but not his spelling, as he swears 'never to look at or correct' a letter to him again, 'after the outrageous fables' Edward circulated about his 'beautiful and chaste letters from Italy'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Hotel Scapolatielli, Corpo di Cava (written on printed notepaper for the Hôtel de Londres, Gênes - crossed out). - Marsh's letter gave Bob much pleasure, since the 'stupid people at Naples' have not yet sent his first on; his address 'hints fascinating suggestions of rustic English scenery, and milk drunk and mild-maids beflirted in dairies'. Asks if Marsh is alone, or whether this letter is '"solus ad solum", as Flaubert used to write to Maxime Ducamp'. Read [William?] Archer's review of the plays produced by the Independent Theatre [Society] in the "Pall Mall Budget", and supposes it was 'in some slight degree inspired by' Marsh's; hopes this 'wonderful pale-faced black-haired [man: Lugné-Poe, see 15/322]' will still be in London when he returns at the end of the month; asks if it was Titian's portrait of Ariosto Marsh was reminded of. Has read Maeterlinck's "Intruse"; did not feel anything strongly for the writer, but would not like to have written the play: did not think the 'poetical or romantic element to which realism was totally sacrificed... was not quite good enough', that Maeterlink was 'not the right man to do it well, but that he could imaging 'a real poet doing something very wonderful in that line'. Glad Oswald [Sickert] 'has seen the last of those Beautiful Englanders' ["Beautiful Britain", published by the Werner Company]; remembers Marsh talking about Sickert's second novel a while ago and thought he had said it was finished, so asks whether this is a third. Asks whether [Stanley] Makower's book is out yet.

Marsh seems 'to have been going the round of our distinguished men pretty thoroughly'; makes Bob 'writhe with envy to read your account; would particularly like to see [Robert] Bridges, and means to make Roger [Fry], Bridges' nephew, take him one day. Has a book of Bridges' verse with him here, which is 'very readable and at times very beautiful'; Fry is 'enthusiastic' about him, and reads Bob passages aloud from "Prometheus [the Firegiver]"; Bob thinks 'a calmness and gentleness of tone and harmony about him... seems to make him a sort of painters poet'; hopes Marsh was 'not badly shown up' for his 'neglect' of Bridges' recent books. A man called [Henry Charles] Beeching lives with Bridges [he in the Rectory at Yattendon, Bridges in the manor house there; Beeching married Bridge's niece] and 'has just published a volume of milky poetry for which Roger has done a frontispiece' ["In a Garden and Other Poems"]; Roger says they quarrel with each other 'off and on in a mild chronic sort of way'. Asks whether Marsh saw Beeching.

Is living an 'ideal sort of life here'; describes his daily routine of exercise, study and meals; he eats omelettes, risotto, 'some wonderful things they call fritelli', for which he gives instructions and states his intention to continue making them in England. His work is 'just as mysterious' to himself as it is to Marsh; does not have the 'faintest idea what it is going to turn out' as; the plot is a 'puzzle' to him, the style is he knows 'vicious and unnatural as a rule' though he hopes it is good sometimes, and the important thing is to get it finished. Has the greatest difficulty finding names for his characters; his hero is called Benedict, 'an awfull name... which mercifully shortens into Bendy'. Badly wants a name for 'a sort of Jim Stephen who has not gone mad' but has achieved nothing due to 'an incorrigible laziness and want of enterprise'; he is in danger of losing his wife to the hero. Bob was just creating a character called Paul who was turning out 'without my intending it, uncommonly like you'; Marsh's letter has made him realise with 'horror' what he was doing and he may have to take Paul out. The character is engaged to a very charming girl who is like someone Bob knows. Hopes to be back in England in about three weeks; intends to 'plunge into an incredible carreer of gluttony [sic] and Pantegruelizing'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

29 Beaufort Str[eet], Chelsea. - Hears that Marsh has done well [in his civil service exams] but not 'what particular function' - colonial, military, or financial, he will choose; hopes he is 'satisfied and happy'. Sorry that Marsh could not come to Wallington, and hopes he has good hunting and fishing in Scotland. Asks what he thinks of the Czar; would like to meet 'a live deer-stalking tyrant'. Has taken Copse Cottage, near Friday's Hill [home of the Pearsall Smiths]; Bertie and Alys [Russell] left for America today, and Logan is soon leaving for Italy, so Bob will be glad of occasional company. Intends to hire a piano for Marsh and [G.E.] Moore; has four bedrooms, three sitting rooms and four sculleries. Tells Marsh to return from Scotland 'not too religious, and... without loosing [sic] your artistic instinct' as he is 'required as a patron and lover of young art to guarantee a guinea of the... fund for Roger [Fry's] exhibition at Cambridge, which will include works by Conder, Ricket[t]s, Shannon, Steer, W[alter] Sickert, Rothenstein, Maccoll, Savage, Houseman and Tonks [emphasised]. Also wants Marsh to get [Desmond] MacCarthy and [? Francis] Balfour, for whom he himself does not have addeses, to contribute; promises to do so should be sent to A[rthur] E[verett] Shipley at Christs [College Cambridge]. Has been writing letters all morning, imagining what he will look like in the new frock-coat which he is having made for the wedding of Roger [Fry] and Helen [Coombe], at which he is to be best man.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Durbins, Guildford. - Thanks Bob for the sympathy [on his failure to gain the Slade Professorship at Cambridge]; thinks he is 'not made for titles & posts & honours' and does not care if he can get by without them; only wants the money. Would love to do the designs for Bob's opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"] and thinks he could; would manage the scenery more easily than the costumes, where [Charles] Rickett's 'knowledge & experience' would ;give him a great pull'; does not want Bob to think he must choose him over Ricketts, though does believe in some ways he 'can interpret you & [Donald] Tovey better than he could'; would be 'more abstract and less assertive', as he feels 'the great danger of opera is the number of sensations which compete for attention'. Feels the design should be Mycenean rather than Greek.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Lungarno Acciajuoli, Firenze. - Thanks Trevelyan for the trouble he has taken over Fry's book: though the book was badly published, he himself does not think Oldm[eadow] has acted guilefully. Describes a conversation he and Binyon had with Oldmeadow. The new edition is very good. This affair must not affect Trevelyan's friendship with Binyon. He and Helen have spent the afternoon in the Boboli [Gardens]; now must read Rumohr in German. Asks for news about the clavichord [made by Dolmetsch; decorated by Helen Fry]. Is glad Sidney Colvin thought well of his work.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Bob's letters arrived just as Bessie 'was preparing a little moral lecture' to him for forgetting her aunt's birthday; this was 'rather a festive day' as the doctor let her aunt get up out of bed . Difficulties of preparing food for the invalid; the cook has been a real help; she is a Roman Catholic and told Bessie she has been praying for her aunt; the other servants have also been very good. Amused her to see how Bob wrote more neatly in his letter to her aunt, at least until near the end. Envies him for succeeding in tickling a lizard; has always wanted to do so herself but they would never listen long enough to her 'whistles & singing'. Next day, writes that her uncle has gone to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture; this is the first of the series she will miss, which she is sorry for as it promised to be especially interesting, with 'a human skeleton... posed in a graceful attitude next to the lecturer's table'. Ambro came to lunch and was sorry to hear of their changed plans; suggested that his wife Marie should come and stay while Bessie is away, enabling them to keep to the old plans. Does not think this would work, as Marie would probably tire her aunt out and Bessie would not like to leave until her aunt is about the house again. Received a kind letter this morning from Bob's mother saying she quite understood and suggesting Bessie came on 14 Feb to spend a week at Welcombe; she could then go to the Frys, and then spend a few days with them in London before returning home. Must wait and see how her aunt is. Lady Trevelyan was also glad Bessie had told Bob to stay at Ravello; teases him about spending more time with his 'nine young ladies' [the Muses]. Was hard to read in Bob's letter of his plans to return by the end of next week; at least he may have better weather travelling later. Her cousin at Leiden [Louise Hubrecht] was 'charmed' by Bob's poems ["Mallow and Asphodel"] and has sent them on to the Röntgens who 'admired them very much & studied them together'; jokes how 'advantageous' it is to marry a foreign wife who will help 'spread one's fame abroad'. Looking forward very much to seeing Bob again; feels she can say anything to him; has only ever had Bramine [Hubrecht] at home to talk to in the same way, and saw very little of her. Likes the 'beautiful exquisite Blake-like imaginative drawing of the Bessie-tree' in Bob's 'intermezzo letter'.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

Department of Prints and Drawings, British Museum, London: W.C. - Trevelyan can certainly let them publish the Su Tung Po poem in the UDC [Union of Democratic Control?]; asks only that his name not be used; does not think he has anything else similar; is sorry 'Wieger spoils the story of Wu-ti. He would'. Thinks the plan with Roger Fry [to publish a book] will come off; Fry does not want illustrations, and Waley hopes he will allow the cover to be plain; does not 'mind as long as it doesn't savour too definitely of Bloomsbury, 1917'; Fry was 'awfully nice'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is enjoying her time with Madame Grandmont; wonders whether Robert came home last week. They had a beautiful walk on the moors on Saturday. Very glad to get Elizabeth's news of Aunt Margaret [Holland] 'as it is never easy to understand from men about illness'; very sad to think of her condition. Sir George sends his love and thanks for the letter; he has gone to fish this morning. In the afternoon they will attend a meeting of the managers of Cambo school. Elizabeth must tell her what she decides about the violin, and about the house. Is sorry to hear from Mr [Roger] Fry that one of their children [Pamela?] has been ill; supposes they do not see much of the Frys now. Sends regards to Madame Grandmont; wishes they had been in London during her stay. A postscript says that if Elizabeth wants tea in London she is welcome to take it at No. 8 [Grosvenor Crescent]; the housemaid's name is Maria Springett.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Has received Bob's letter with his plans to leave Ravello around 26 Jan, and is delighted; her aunt is steadily improving and Bob may even find her downstairs. Her uncle has not suffered from his disturbed nights, and they now have a nurse for a couple of a hours a day to get her aunt up; they will see when Bob arrives whether she will be able to go to England on 14 Feb as his mother suggests. If he wants to 'read up about mediaeval times', he could find what he wanted at the library in the Hague and work there in the morning while she was busy; there is a 'wonderful collection of mediaeval miniatures & manuscripts' which the director [Geertrudus Cornelis Willem Byvanck], a friend of the family, would be pleased to show him. Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is much better; she and Bramine [Hubrecht] started for Taormina last Wednesday; Bob may have heard from her as Bramine wondered whether they could meet at Naples; now they will be at Rocca Bella with Grandmont. The doctor advised Tuttie should stay for three months at Taormina, so she will have to give up her work at Florence for the moment.

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Guildford. - Apologises for being in Paris. Thursday afternoon or evening the best time; has to dine in town on Wednesday, Sorry he 'seems so snarkish' [ie, elusive, like Lewis Carroll's Snark?] at the moment. Has been 'seeing the French Post-Imp[ressionist] poets'; Bob does not like them but they are 'nice people, only they will like Kipling'.

Letter from John Masefield to R. C. Trevelyan

Wolverhampton Art and Industrial Exhibition, 1902, Gresham Chambers, Lichfield Street, Wolverhampton. - Hopes the promised volume of short stories by Yeats has reached Trevelyan; asks him to say what he thinks of it. Attendances at the Exhibition 'wretched'; the Gallery is the most popular part of it for its size. Sends his regards to [Roger] Fry.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Dated 'Sunday'. Apologises for not sending the books earlier; was very busy with the lectures and with arranging for his parents visiting to see Helen [Coombe]; Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] and 'a sister' have also been staying. Has filled the box up with clothes which Mrs Smith [their landlady] thought Bob 'ought to want'. Says 'I told you so' about Bob being in Italy: it is better than 'going Jonkopping in Sweden [visiting Jönköping?]' and he might get some work done; suggests going to Fiesole or Prato, though that might be too hot. Asks if Bob intends to stay till winter; if so they will arrange to meet. Everything now settled: he and Helen hope to marry early in November and come out to Italy. Has had 'rather an awful time with his parents': very sorry for his father and his disappointment in him and so 'made a huge effort to get through the misunderstanding' but only gave him and his mother pain. This has made him 'awfully depressed'; found it hard to 'pull himself together for the lectures' but thinks they were the best he has done; pleased that both Goldie and [Thomas Sturge?] Moore liked them. Has been bicycling with Goldie, who is 'getting more reconciled about Helen'; thinks he 'begins to see that it can't make any real difference between [them]'. They went to Woodbridge and tried but failed to find [Edward] Fitzgerald's grave, then to Dedham 'which is the only [piece of French country in England and explains Constable'. Helen's harpsichord [which she is decorating for Arnold Dolmetsch] is 'going to be a great success'; she is 'quite decided' that Bob must either come back for the wedding or meet them in Italy.

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