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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Letter from Margery Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Rd, Hampstead. - Writing on her brother Roger's behalf: apologises that he has no time this week to meet Trevelyan but would like very much to see him next week. Helen is sleeping and eating well; she was very restless on Sunday but quieter now, though more depressed. Roger visited yesterday but did not see her. Her doctor seems to have encouraged him to be hopeful, but he evidently expects a long period of recovery.

Letter from Margery Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Madeira Cottage, Lyme Regis. - Good of Trevelyan to write so promptly about the scheme for a masque to mark the opening of the new Library [at Somerville College, Oxford, see 4/55 and 4/56]; sketches the loggia below the library, with disposition of pillars inside and steps in front, where she thinks the masque could be put on. Expects she could get twenty or thirty performers; it would be convenient if a rout of beasts were included as many old students made themselves costumes for a former performance. Feels it should be more of a pageant than a drama: does not think there are any particularly good actors, and it would fit the spirit of the occasion. The opening of the library will be early in June, which may not leave Trevelyan enough time.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Little news: Helen is more or less the same, though he thinks her sisters' visits help and her brother is going to see her soon, and this stage might go on for some time. He and Goldie [Dickinson] are enjoying Roundhurst, though he has been up at the British Museum all the week. Saw Binyon: does not think the anthology ["Garland of New Poetry" (1899)?] will be good; it is mostly Miss Coleridge and a few others; thinks Binyon has closed the subscription list. Asks Trevelyan to tell Berenson he is working on the dating of pictures: mentions two works by Gentile [Bellini]. Augustus [Enticknap] has whooping cough. A separate sheet added as postscript encourages Trevelyan to write a simple letter to Helen with advice on what to put: thinks 'part of the depression comes from an idea that she has done wrong and people disapprove'. Thanks Trevelyan's mother: grapes would be welcome.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst,. - Has opened and looked at Trevelyan's Harunobu print and congratulates him on the purchase. Fry will make Berenson envious when they meet, as Mrs [Mary] Costelloe came over to Roundhurst the other day: it was a struggle for her to conceal her feelings. Went to Friday's Hill [home of the Pearsall Smiths] yesterday. No fresh news from Roehampton [of Helen Fry]: sometimes it seems impossible to go on. Will leave on Thursday with much regret as the house and Goldie [Dickinson] have made life bearable; thinks he will go to 12 Pembroke Square, Mrs Sickert's house. He and Goldie slept out in Trevelyan's field two nights ago.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Has found Trevelyan's 'original' [?] and sends it. Also sends his translation of the sonnet about Jacopo [Bellini] and Pisanello [enclosed]: Leonhard Sickert's suggestion that 'onfesce' equals 'offere' is obviously right, and 'fidia' is Pheidias. Saw Helen: her improvement is maintained though she was much the same today.

Letter from John Luce to R.C. Trevelyan

1490260 Gun. Luce, J. M., A Battery B Sub Section, 207 A.A. Trug. Ret. R.A., Devizes, Wiltshire. - Is happy to learn Trevelyan is 'emending Horace'; asks to see the 'iconoclastic epistle' if Joan [Allen?] does not mind. Thanks him for the offer of books. Has seen Desmond [MacCarthy's] article on Roger Fry's biography [by Virginia Woolf]. Agrees that [Dick?] Bosanquet's three most recent poems are most interesting, but none are as original as his first group. Has provided some criticism, at Bosanquet's request, and wishes Trevelyan would criticise his metrical form. Expects Joan has told Trevelyan something of his daily routine, which is fairly monotous, though enlivened by his 'Jesuit and musician friends'. Recently had scores of the Mozart operas sent, and they ran through "Don Giovanni"; next Saturday they will try "The Magic Flute". Sends love to Bessie, Ursula and Julian.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Thinks that tea [with Helen] went very well and that Trevelyan was just right: hopes that soon any awkwardness will pass and they will be able to talk in an ordinary way. Is glad Trevelyan thinks Helen looked well: to him this is where she has most changed. Paid a surprise visit to her on Sunday and found her very well. May change his address.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Has talked to Mr Craile [?] about Trevelyan's book: the corrections were just in time and no more can be accepted. Binyon asks whether Trevelyan will contribute to an anthology he's preparing which is to include by himself, Bridges, Stephen Philips and others. Hopes that before Trevelyan goes north they will see each other again. Berenson was charming and he likes him 'increasingly'. Thanks Trevelyan for all he has done [during Helen Fry's illness].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Has seen Dr Chambers: he thinks that Helen is much the same, though Helen's sister Mildred considers that she is much brighter. Is not going to see her yet; waiting is 'slow and weary work'. He and Goldie Dickinson are enjoying Roundhurst very much: Mrs Entiknapp [Enticknap] is very good to them and Augustus approves of them. Is going on with his illustrations though Macmillan's plan for an illustrated M. Arnold is not good for his prospects. Hopes Trevelyan will have a good time with B. [Berenson?]: must not let him criticise too much. Will probably go to London for good soon as he has a lot of lecture work to do, though he is far less unhappy in the country.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Very good of Trevelyan to send 'these charming Chinoiseries': Fry will enjoy them and take them to show Helen. He and she have had a very good day together, though it is starting to be a strain to go back [to hospital]: she wants to go and stay with her family but they need Dr S[avage]'s leave. Asks if Trevelyan can give him a letter of recommendation for the London Library.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hitchin Croft, Churt, Farnham (a house kept by the late Liberal candidate for Hitchin [John Wattridge], who is now Conservative agent here). - Felt he needed to rest on Sunday so instead of visiting Trevelyan they read Goldie [Dickinson's] dialogue in the sun. Has been to London to work on his lectures and see about the house. He, Mrs Widdrington and a cabinet maker have been again to see if there is any dry rot but it passed the test and he will now try to get it. The news from R[oe]Hampton [of Helen Fry] is good but there is little change, and Dr Savage says she is unlikely to be much better for months. Asks Trevelyan to tell Berenson he will visit his hotel next Wednesday and apologises for not seeing him on Sunday. Asks when the final proofs [of Trevelyan's "Mallow and Asphodel"?] are coming out; hopes he will become very learned about the Oxford drawings.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Originally enclosing an account for housekeeping expenses: Trevelyan should take off the rent if he did in fact pay up to Lady Day. Explains how he has reckoned coal and wine. Had a good time on the river: Jack [McTaggart] 'delighted with his own absurdities and limitations'. Is going to Heathfield [Heathfield Park, home of William Cleverly Alexander?] again to paint.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, London Rd, Dorking. - The past month has been as happy as any he and his wife have know, and Nell is quite her old self. They have begun house-hunting for Trevelyan and seen one which may suit him, though it is rather near the railway. Would like to send Francesca some Indian silk and cotton but knowing what the Italian customs are like will send them to Trevelyan.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, Dorking. - Is glad Trevelyan is back: will be working on the Colchester lecture until the 18th so invites him to visit then. The Albert Hall ones are finished and went well. He and Helen have not yet found Trevelyan a house, though the one they looked at [see 4/20] is still free; the wine has not arrived yet. Asks how Trevelyan's play "Cecilia" ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] is getting on. Helen and Goldie [Dickinson] are 'offensively & increasingly Daily Telegraphic together'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Mentions a 'heated Wagnerian discord' on the last occasion he and Trevelyan met; expects he himself as a third party was most exasperating. Wishes they were coming north to see Trevelyan: wants to talk to him about Moore's poems ["The Vinedresser and Other Poems"?] which he tends to appreciate. Sees many traces of [George] Meredith there. Discusses books: [William] Roscoe's life of Lorenzo [de' Medici] is very good; didn't see the Leonardo but thinks it must be incomplete, as well as 'faked and edited'; doesn't know Nicolini but expects it will be good reading; 'Eber's thing' [?] is very popular, he has not read it himself and does not think it can be first rate from its enthusiasts. Has painted a tempera picture of Shillingley Park [sic: Shillinglee Park?] which he thinks his best so far. Asks Trevelyan to visit before they go to Italy and see about his house.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Is grateful for Trevelyan's letter: asks him to send a post card to 21 Hill Street ["Life and Letters"] with the date of the "New Statesman" issue in which his article appeared. Had himself noticed a resemblance, between [W. H.?] Davis and Herrick since he has been reading the "Hesperides", which he discusses. Knows how much Trevelyan misses Roger [Fry], and says they should 'always keep near each other'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

He and Helen did not make it to the sea due to heat, but got to Petworth and had a 'divine evening' in the Park; went on to Fittleworth and slept at a good inn [probably the Swan] where they saw Edmund Garrett's 'effusions' and drawings by J. Badley in the visitors' book. They have been to Agnews [Thomas Agnew & Sons, Old Bond Street, to see an exhibition of twenty Italian masters]; Agnew is 'utterly commercial but quite pleasant'. Discusses the authenticity of the pictures: thinks Trevelyan is wrong and the Raphael portrait is genuine. Asks Trevelyan to visit and meet Mrs Grammont [sic: Bramine Hubrecht, painter, wife of Alphonse Grandmont].

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

The Grafton Galleries, Ltd., 8, Grafton Street, W. - Did discuss R.'s [Roger Fry's] answer to Sargent, but did not read it; recommended corrections, which perhaps will be made; did not know Trevelyan was worried it might not be 'in the right key'. Wishes he had heard Moore on 'Time' and imagines the interruptions; asks where 'the working men' were last night.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt. - Apologises for the delay in writing: Helen wanted to address a poem to Trevelyan about his flowers though Fry has warned her Melodie Dolmetsch [sic: Elodie, Arnold Dolmetsch's second wife] had no success that way. Thinks they will not visit till the end of the month. Is reading Balzac. His portrait of the 'O.B.' [Oscar Browning] got very like but he has made him 'a little sanctimonious': thinks he will be able to put this right, but doubts whether he is good at likeness or character. The proofs [of his book on Giovanni Bellini] have gone; mocks himself for his Gallicisms. Offers to talk to White regarding the disagreement over Trevelyan's taking a lease on a house: thinks it would be best to insist the lease is terminable in case of building. Doodle of Pegasus. A line in Helen Fry's hand should introduce a poem, but nothing follows: incomplete letter?

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Message left in case MacCarthy is out when Trevelyan calls: if Trevelyan does not fetch this [an unknown item], he will have it sent to the Mill House. His mission was not very successful. His mother returns tomorrow. Is going to Eton tonight. Thinks he must stay a few days with his mother, as he has not seen her for weeks; Trevelyan should expect him on Tuesday. Has got D'Annunzio and will bring it; checks whether Trevelyan took 'Sophy K'. Asks if the news about seeing [Roger] Fry means that his wife is ill again.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hotel Prinz Heinrich, Dorothea Strasse, Berlin. - He and Helen have just returned from an excellent concert: Beethoven and Mozart. Describes their stay at Ede with the family of Trevelyan's friend Elizabeth van der Hoeven [soon to become his fiancée]: they liked the 'old people' very much - the old man [Paul François Hubrecht] reminded Fry of Mr Behrens; gives his impression of Elizabeth who was 'rather shy and inaccessible'. A sister [Maria Hubrecht?] of Madame Grandmont was also there: the Frys thought her paintings (canvas painted to look like tapestry) were dreadful. M. [Alphonse] Grandmont read some of his French translation of Browning's "Pippa Passes"; thinks Trevelyan is wrong about him and that he has more artistic sensibility than his wife, whose 'Ruskinian idealism' has 'deadened her sensations' and who follows the modern trend Fry deplores of always looking for 'meanings & messages' in art. Heard the Biebers [sic: a work by Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber]: Elizabeth is 'most accomplished' but the piece was too modernized; and Handel. Came to Berlin yesterday and the art collection is splendid; comment on German taste.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Lungarno Acciajuoli, Firenze. - Thanks Trevelyan for the trouble he has taken over Fry's book: though the book was badly published, he himself does not think Oldm[eadow] has acted guilefully. Describes a conversation he and Binyon had with Oldmeadow. The new edition is very good. This affair must not affect Trevelyan's friendship with Binyon. He and Helen have spent the afternoon in the Boboli [Gardens]; now must read Rumohr in German. Asks for news about the clavichord [made by Dolmetsch; decorated by Helen Fry]. Is glad Sidney Colvin thought well of his work.

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