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Pethick-Lawrence Papers Lawrence, Emmeline Pethick- (1867–1954), suffragette, wife of the 1st Baron Pethick-Lawrence Imagen Con objetos digitales
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Carbon copy of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Victor Gollancz

Offers to send him the typescript of her autobiography, to be entitled The Old Order Changeth (published as My Part in a Changing World), the substance of which deals with the suffrage movement and the peace movement.

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Transcript

16th. November, 1937.
Victor Gollancz Limited, | Publishers,
14, Henrietta Street, | Strand, W.C.2.

Dear Mr. Gollancz,

I have been engaged during the last year in writing the story of my life and I should like to submit it to you if you would be interested to see it.

The title I have chosen is “The Old Order Changeth” with a sub-title “An Autobiography” over my name.

The substance of the book which deals with the suffrage movement and with the peace movement, both of which had international aspects, will be of interest in the Dominions and also in America which I have visited five times.

There are twenty-two chapters and I am just finishing the twenty-second. The whole consists of about 150,000 words.

Would you care for me to send the typescript in a few days when it is quite finished, to be submitted to your reader? If so, and his report is favourable, we could perhaps then meet to decide details,

Yours sincerely,
[Added in pencil] Signed E P L

Draft of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Victor Gollancz

‘As from’ 11 Old Square, London, W.C.2.—Accepts his terms (for publishing her autobiography; see 1/366). Will send the revised manuscript in January. The book should sell well in America, and might form the basis of a film about the suffrage movement.

(Marked ‘Copy’, but probably a draft.)

Carbon copy of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Eamon De Valera

Congratulates him on the conclusion of the treaty between Great Britain and Eire. Refers to their previous meetings at Washington and elsewhere and to her efforts to expose the abuses of the Black and Tans. She has touched on some of these matters in her book My Part in a Changing World, which has just been published.

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Transcript

26th. April. 1938.

Dear Mr. De Valera,

May I offer you my warmest congratulations and express my great delight at the conclusion of the Treaty between Great Britain and Eire. I am very thankful that harmonious relations have been established at last between the two countries.

You will not remember me of course, but I spoke on the same platform with you in the City of Washington at a protest meeting against the treatment of Mr. MacSweeny {1}, the Mayor of Cork, in prison and I have also met you on other occasions. I followed with very great grief the horrible episode of the Black and Tans in Eire and I was the first person to get the abuses exposed in the “Daily News” becuase† I went quietly to Eire and obtained sworn statement which I was prepared to stand over in a Court of Law. I am only telling you these incidents because I would like you to know how I have followed events in your country with deep sympathy which enables me now to rejoice all the more in this happy conclusion.

I have touched on some of these matters in a book I have just published entitled “My Part in a Changing World.[”] I do rejoice with you and my other friends, the patriots of Eire, who cherished the dream of her freedom when it seemed impossible and have seen that dream come true in their life time.

Yours sincerely,
[blank]

Rt. Hon. Eamon De Valera,
Government Buildings,
Dublin,
Ireland.

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{1} i.e. Terence MacSwiney.

† Sic.

Letter from Eamon De Valera to Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence

Roinn an Taosigh, Baile Átha Cliath (Department of the Taoiseach, Dublin).—He has not forgotten her assistance at Washington. Those English people who deplored their Government’s treatment of Ireland in the past must feel relieved at the prospect of improved relations between the two countries. Hopes that the partition of the country will soon be removed.

Letter from Sylvia Pankhurst to Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence

(3 Charteris Road, Woodford Green, Essex?)—Sends news of Richard’s health and development.

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Transcript

Boxing Day

Dearest Emmeline,

The spirit moves me to write to you to say that in spite of plenty of anxieties I feel a flood of happiness today. Raddie {1} and Richard are in the garden. It is warm and spring-like.

Richard has not had so much as a cold this winter! He is bright and well. Instead of having the doctor like last year he was able to make Christmas presents for his friends and dress the tree Mrs Brimley {1} brought him. He stitched over a pencil drawing on paper tacked to the ribbon to make me little calendar banners. Then we tore the paper away, and the red ribbon was left. He was greatly pleased.

He looks straight and tall. His brows are straight, and his thoughts are kind. He puts bread and cheese by the mousehold†, crumbs for the birds, milk for the cat. He brought his money box to me to buy a present for Daddy. He has his own ways and his own character. He does things one would never think of and says: “I have a good idea.” I gaze at him, amazed, and say to myself: where have you come from, little man? He is physically joyous as I never was—plunging into nearly cold water with a zest—not every day—but when he feels like it (other days prefers warm) {2}. He loves to “dance” and jump and climb.

It is a daily marvel this new person—like noone else—himself. One realises the miracle more when one knows one bore him. I look at his father—the boy is not him—not me—new entirely. How have you—so entirely—individual—sprung from us? I ask it to myself so often. This year when I heard the carol singers I thought so often of waiting for him at Hampstead. How wonderful it all was. How you came to make his happy arrival safe and all that one could desire. So I feel a great flood of gratitude and joy.

With love
Sylvia P.

What I feel so vividly of his being a new person is true of all the children I know, but it comes home so forcibly when every day one sees it in a close intimate way one felt generally before—not with this piercing astonishme[nt] {3}.

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{1} Reading uncertain.

{2} ‘other … warm’ interlined. Brackets supplied.

{3} A small piece of the paper has been torn away.

† Sic.

Letter from Charlotte Despard to Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence

29 Glenburn Park (Belfast).—Reciprocates her New Year’s greeting, and reflects on the situation in Northern Ireland.

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Transcript

29 Glenburn Park

My very dear Mrs Pethick Law[ren]ce

I have been intending for many days to write to you, to thank you for your beautiful New Year’s greeting and to send you and your husband my best wishes for the New Year and the years that are to follow; but, though I am wonderfully well for my age, I very seldom write in my own hand. My delightful young Secretary types for me. Strange how the years run on!

We are full of work and life interests of all kinds here under perhaps the worst government in Europe—a great industrial population—some of them of a better and mentally stronger type than any I have ever [met]—much distress[,] keen dissatisfaction and the spirit of revolt. The women are rather behindhand. We have not been able to do much with them yet.

I will tell you more about all this when we meet, as I hope we shall do in the Summer.

And now I must write no more except to say that I hope and trust that you are well and not suffering too much (if you are in England[)] from the bad weather

With much love and many kindly memories
Yours affec {2}
C. Despard

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{1} This word was not completed distinctly.

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