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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear good news of Elizabeth and Robert and especially that there are 'pleasant friends to take walks with'. Would have liked to join them on the trip to Amalfi and have 'seen the lovely pergola again'. Glad the rumour about Mr Fry [that he had died] was not true; wonders how it started. More people drop in for tea than at Wallington, which is good for Sir George in the winter as it stops him getting 'too absorbed in his writing'. Henry James is coming for a few days on Saturday, and Dorothy Ward 'to help amuse him'. Is writing an interesting 'Life of Mazzini' by Bolton King, which is 'very well written'. The local recollection of their parties last summer is 'still vivid'. The weather is fine and mild, though TInson 'remarks that "we shall have a pinch for it, later"'. Wishes she had seen Ravello and Amalfi in the sunshine. Tells Elizabeth to find out about the homeopathic cold medicine; has often heard it to be 'very efficacious'. Asks if Elizabeth would like to join the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club; Caroline must arrange it before 20 February if so. Charles has gone to Paris with introductions to politicians. Sends love to Robert, and is glad his play 'prospers'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Lungarno Acciajuoli, Florence. - Is glad Trevelyan is coming out to Italy: they must meet. Trevelyan must not be discouraged by his current difficulties. When B.B. and he were discussing Moore's book [Thomas Sturge Moore's "The Vinedresser and Other Poems"?], Berenson said he found 'far more poetry... and sense of beauty' in Trevelyan's. Has had letter from Binyon: hopes Trevelyan will see him before he comes abroad, as the 'whole business' [the quarrel over the publication of Fry's book on Bellini, see 4/28] must end soon. The 'Frullinites' are being 'chary': it's best to visit them rather than stay; has met Loeser whose personality makes Berenson's attitude understandable.

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Postmarked Folkestone. - Thanks Bob for his letter. Has seen P[aul] Nash and arranged for him to 'try his hand at decorative work [at the Omega Workshops]... a good test of where his real power lies'. Thinks Nash has 'imagination of some kind' and needs to find the way to use it; finds him very sympathetic and would like to have him with them. Has sold two of his own pictures. Is going [to France] for a while to see the Vildracs and some pictures.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Durbins, Guildford. - Has had a 'furious week' at the Omega [Workshops] and been too busy to make plans; hopes Bob will come over to see their things: thinks there are some boats Julian would like. Will come and stay the night soon with Bob; suggests Boxing Day; can cycle over if there are no trains. Adds in a postscript that they have 'a selection of modern French literature', chosen by [Charles] Vildrac, except that some books have been kept back 'because the customs house officers think they may be indecent'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Is writing to Trevelyan instead of working on his lectures on the Byzantines. Has just read [Stephen] Philips "P&F" ["Paolo and Francesca"] and shares Trevelyan's conclusions: it is very English and there is no real poetry in it. Trevelyan, Binyon and Moore are far superior, but it is Philips whom the critics praise. Has had an irritating letter from Mrs Grandmont. Yes, Moretto was a Brescian. Describes the Frys' journey back from Italy. Has been to Westcott and thinks the house will do very well: will get to work with the friezes soon. Helen says they will be delighted to have Amica [Elizabeth van der Hoeven] any time in February; hopes he will have some time free from lecturing to show her around Dorking. His arch at the New English [Art Club] looks 'abominable'. Hopes Trevelyan and Berenson will sort things out. Sends love to Ravello.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Durbins. - Has not sent [Bob's translation of Aristophanes's] "Lysistrata" yet as he wanted Goldie [Lowes Dickinson's] criticisms; Goldie came on Sunday and Fry will read it to Madame Donnay [sic: Vera Donnet] tomorrow. Will try two days in town. Has read Bob's "Lucretius [On Death]" 'with very great delight; would like to bring out a second book, called "Lucretius On Origins" or similar. They should 'stir up Desmond [MacCarthy] to the point of writing' and perhaps advertise 'in educational places - girls' colleges & such like'; Margery [his sister] tells him about 'yearning intellectual appetites among the lower middle classes of Birmingham' though he is unsure 'whether they'd rise to' Lucretius. Is much better for his 'long rest', though managed to 'paint a good lot'; expects to be in town a little now, if he keeps well, but will be back at Durbins after 23 Mar when Pamela returns, so Bob could come over again then.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Grimsby Farm, Long Lane, Coldash, Newbury. - Since, 'like Alice [in Wonderland]' he always takes 'a great interest in questions of eating and drinking', he is worried that Trevy is under-eating, unless risotto is 'very comprehensive and satisfying', like the dish described [in Aristophanes' "Ecclesiazusae/Assemblywomen" in a long compound word of which he quotes the beginning. Other than that Trevy seems to be having a 'perfect time', much better than he is himself. Wants very much to see Trevy's work; tells him to 'leave Paul as he is' [see 15/274] or just change the name so he will not recognise him; expects the book will be 'uncommon good'. Oswald [Sickert] nearly finished his book at Christmas, but did nothing more between then and Easter, as he was too busy with "Beautiful B[retain": published by the Werner Company]; he says a great deal work needs still to be done on it. [Stanley] Makower's book ["The Mirror of Music"] should be out soon after Easter. The 'great literary event' has been [Arthur] Verrall's "Euripides the Rationalist"; does not think he has ever read 'anything so clever'; will not say anything about it as it would spoil it, and it seems 'perfectly convincing'. Has been 'getting on very well with [Robert] Bridges': went with him to Oxford for a day last week; he seems 'the biggest man I've ever known anything of, perhaps equal with [William Gunion?] Rutherford'; cannot think of anyone else so 'thoroughly serious, thoroughly humorous, and thoroughly consistent', except perhaps Sickert who does not seem to be 'exactly "great" at present', though may be at forty. Bridges is bringing out an edition of Keats soon which will, for example see 'plain "Endymion" as an allegory". They went to the Bodleian, which is 'a delightful place'; Lady Shelley has recently given them 'a fine collection of Shelley MSS etc'. Roger [Fry] is coming to Yattendon soon after Easter, but unfortunately Marsh will have left by then. The 'great thing about Maeterlinck is the sound'; "L'Intruse" was a 'complete failure on the stage'; "Pelléas et Mélisande" 'delightful to listen to'; afraid the 'beautiful M. Lugné Poë' 'is gone for good, and won't come back, the theatre was so dreadfully empty' though the 'decent critics' were all in favour has not seen [William] Archer's articles, but Shaw 'praised the company highly' who has been in Fiesole, will soon go 'for a sail down the Adriatic', and return to England at the end of April. Asks if Trevy has seen the reports of Russell's brother [Frank]'s case; believes it will be settled on Tuesday week; thinks [Russell's wife] 'the Countess and her mother exposed themselves pretty fully'.

Heard from 'dear [Arthur] Shipley this morning, he's in solitary splendour at Cambridge'. Asks if Shipley is Trevy's 'idea of Horace', as he is Marsh's own, both physically and in character. Has also had a 'very gay letter from T. T. [Phelps?], furious' with Trevy for writing twice to Marsh and not to him. Has heard from 'the Seatollerites': George [Trevelyan] and [George] Moore both wrote last Sunday and the party seems to have been a success up to then. Has been 'working very hard' himself, but does not think he is getting on and worries about his Tripos [examinations]; the only reading he is doing apart from revision is de Quincey, of whom he is becoming 'very fond'. Thought the murder Trevy told him about at Wallington, '[William] Winter's murder [i.e., that committed by Winter]' was in "Murder as a Fine Art [de Quincey's "Murder Considered as one of the Fine Arts"]', but read that this morning and there is nothing about it there; asks where Trevy 'got all the details'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

7 Dalmeny Avenue, N.7. - Would have liked very much to come down and hates not seeing Goldie [Lowes Dickinson], but will not be able to get away unless he 'stick[s] at the jobs' keeping him: wants to finish a 'big nude' he hopes to send to the Autumn Salon. Dr [Edmond] Bonniot, 'gendre [son in law] de M .[Stéphane] Mallarme will not let Fry use the French text [in Fry's proposed English translation of Mallarme's poems], putting forward 'purely dog-in-the-manger' arguments in his letter to Gide; will go on anyway but it will 'spoil the reader's ease very much'. Would like to discuss his preface with Bob at some point. Sends love to Goldie; asks if there is any chance of him coming to town for a night or two this week.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

7 Dalmeny Avenue, N.7. - Thanks Bob for his 'charming Christmas present' [Bob's translation of Aeschylus's "Oresteia"?]; has 'always admired what you did for the Greek play very heartily'. Has been meaning to write congratulations about 'the poem on sleep' which he thought 'the most beautiful & perfect' of Bob's poems he had ever seen; supposes they have both 'taken an unconscionable time in getting through to what we really have to say' but thinks 'for both of us that blessed time has come'. They would have preferred to be 'more of infant prodigies' but supposes they 'have staying power & belong to long-lived families' so mustn't complain. Was sorry not to see Bob at the last lecture; asks him to let him know when he is next in town. Notes in a postscript that he has lost Jaloux's address; would like it if Bob has it as Jaloux has written 'the nicest critique' of his things at the Autumn Salon [in Paris] and he wants to thank him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegr[acht]; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for his letter. Is afraid her aunt is not as well as she first thought on her return. Has had several morning callers, including 'the old lady who used to have the snow in her head'. whose daughter would very much like to come and be their maid, and a little girl for whom Bessie once arranged a stay in the country when she was ill, bringing a wedding present she had made. The farmer from Leiden also came; her uncle is advising her to sell all her landed property before she becomes 'a foreigner' on her marriage, or she will have to pay a heavy tax to do so. Her husband has suggested that the money she gets for it should be invested in the house which her sister wants to buy. Asks if Bob has finished "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]; she has not, as she is finishing [Charlotte Bronte's] "Villette" which 'however silly & absurd in parts interests [her] immensely'. Had some bad dreams last night 'about bombs & suicides & fires in a great hall', after reading about the bombs and the fire at the Théatre Français in Paris, and the fire at the theatre in "Villette". Glad Bob saw [Thomas Sturge] Moore and had a good talk, and that he feels up to more work; he should tell her how he gets on and if her gets any more German done. Discussions of furniture and decoration for their house; asks Bob to send a sample of the green colour [Roger] Fry recommends for the drawing room. Thinks they must give up the idea of buying a new violin for the moment until she knows she can practise and get some lessons; she can always sell some shares if a valuable instrument becomes available as it would be a kind of investment, and probably more than their yearly allowance.

Her uncle and aunt have no objection to them marrying Whit week, and agree 'wonderfully' on most things about the wedding. She and Bob need two male witnesses of age settled in the Netherlands: she can have her uncle and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen and Bob can have Ambro [Hubrecht], but she cannot think of another near kinsman she would like to be present so they may need to ask [Abraham?] Bredius or another neutral. To the wedding breakfast, would like to invite on her side her uncle and aunt, the Grandmonts, Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht], all the Röntgens, the four Hubrechts [Ambro's family], Louise, and her eldest sister Marie. Asks whether any of Bob's friends would like to come, perhaps combining it with a 'little tour through Holland'. Has been cycling in the woods every afternoon, enjoying the sun but getting stiff legs; is reading a few pages of Bob's "Pilgrim's Progress" every night before going to sleep. Knows the painter [Dirk?] Jansen by name, a good teacher at the Hague Academy but she does not care for his paintings either. The Luzacs called to see her uncle and aunt when she was out; he seemed to like Bob. Likes the letter from Frank Holland which Bob sends and the present he is going to give them, as well as the lines by [Laurence] Binyon.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Was good to get the Trevelyans' letter and hear good news of everyone at Ravello. Has done the composition but not yet the drawing [for another frieze at the Trevelyans' house or the illustrations for Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems?"]. Has lots of writing to do: another "Monthly Review" article is just coming out. Is becoming 'quite Berensonian': his lectures have been plagiarised by Julia Cartwright Ady in her book ["The Painters of Florence from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century"] but it is useless to make a fuss. Is glad Lina D. G. [Duff Gordon, later Waterfield] has been praised so highly [for "The Story of Assisi"?]; his review will soon be published. He and Daniel have written about [Herbert] Cook's book on Giorgone; Maccoll has blessed the book. Has had a disagreement with Tom Moore over Fry's qualified praise of [Charles] Shannon. The baby [Julian Fry] is in no hurry to appear; Helen is well but bored with a quiet life.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Rodwell House, Baylham, Nr. Ipswich. - Thanks Bob for sending a copy of his book ["Rimeless Numbers?"]; will pass on the copy he has already bought. Praises Bob's use of hexameter; thinks he has 'perfected [Robert] Bridges's notion and made it a possible vehicle for a discursive kind of eloquence', though he warns against 'run[ning] on rather aimlessly', using 'very banal phrases' and 'the conventional poetic'. Thinks that 'all distinctively poetical language ought to be banned'. Finds some of the other unrhymed metres difficult, probably as he is 'not so familiar with the classic types they come from'. Asks if Bob has read Peter Quennell's book on Japan; thinks it is very good.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for sending "The Speaker" with her letter; likes his poem though does not feel she entirely understands it. Her uncle has taken her aunt out in a carriage for some fresh air and she feels much better for it. Spent Sunday in Amsterdam with the Röntgens who were all well and cheerful; called on [Bram] Eldering in the afternoon and arranged to have lessons once a fortnight; he seems to be 'full of fun & humour'. Yesterday went to see Louise [Hubrecht] and had a very good conversation with her; Louise thinks Maria van Hoeven should go to Ems or Wiesbaden for a few weeks for her health with a nurse, while her husband stayed at home with Bessie to look after him; afraid that her uncle and aunt will take a lot of persuading. Is writing to Bramine today to tell her their plan to marry at Whitsuntide and see if she can come. Mien [Abrahamina Röntgen] is working some beautiful sheets and pillowcases, with embroidery and her own lace, to give them as a wedding present. Bessie is also practising the viola which they brought from Leiden so she can accompany the Brahms songs with Mr Kattendijke; today he sent an etching of a Dutch landscape as a wedding present. Hopes to be able to go to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture tomorrow, then on Monday there is a Röntgen and Messchaert concert, though since Messchaert is at Wiesbaden and not yet well this might be cancelled. There is a Vondel exhibition at Amsterdam; wishes that they could go together. Asks how the Frys are. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother, also a note from Dorothy Fletcher saying they were sorry to have missed Bob and Bessie's call.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - News of the birth of the Frys' son; Helen is doing very well. Went riding at Cambridge with Goldie [Dickinson], was thrown and hurt his calf, only just returned in time for the birth and is still hobbling around. Saw a great deal of George [Trevelyan?] at Cambridge: has just finished reading his book ["England in the Age of Wycliffe, 1368-1520"] which is 'capital' except for the split infinitives. Hopes Bessie is well again. Asks for Trevelyan's opinion, 'as a euphonist', on whether the baby should be called Sebastian Edward or Julian Edward.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Leeds. - Definitely thinks that [Johnson] is acting unfairly over the publication of the book [Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems", with illustrations by Roger Fry]. Will go and see him on his return; meanwhile Trevelyan could have the contract seen by the Authors' Society. Glasgow very full [for the Glasgow International Exhibition] - Fry ended up sleeping at a 'coffee room' - but extremely interesting: the Municipal Gallery [Kelvingrove] is fine; Fry does not believe it's a Giorgione. Also saw Newbattle [Abbey] though due to a storm he could only see the Piero di Cosimo ["Vulcan and Aeolus"] by gas light. Goes tomorrow to Liverpool, then to Gloucester to take B.B. [Berenson] to Sir H[ubert] Parry's house before returning to Dorking. Is sorry to have been unsympathetic about Trevelyan's 'Indian play' ["The Pearl-Tree"?].

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Weybridge. - Thanks Trevelyan for the cheque. Encourages him to read [Wilfred Scawen] Blunt after Goldie [Dickinson]. Has just received the proofs of his 'worthy' piece for the "Nation". Is glad Trevelyan 'has unlocked the key of blue' [?] and that Charlotte interests him. Dined with Roger [Fry] and Clive Bell last night, and '[b]iffed all their art bosh'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Saxifield, Filey Road, Scarborough. - Saw Johnson on Tuesday: he wants to press on with the book [Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems", with illustrations by Roger Fry] and needs a title to go in his catalogue. Johnson says the expense will be around £50 with a fee of £5 to Fry for the twelve drawings: Fry thinks this is not quite possible but he and Trevelyan can discuss when they meet. Wet and cold in Scarborough, but Daniel has taken him for a ride which he enjoyed after some nerves due to his last experience [a fall when riding with Goldie Dickinson, see 4/36]

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Asks if Bob really had the vision he describes in his letter or whether he is just amusing her; talks about their ritual of 'kissing the wall' before sleep; sends a lock of her hair and asks for one of Bob's in return. Thanks him for his explanation of his sonnet in "The Speaker", which she now understands. Returns to the letter after some business over shares at the bank with her uncle, which they were both glad to finish. Discussion of post times. Foolish of "The Speaker" not to put Bob's translation in; asks if he is going to send the "[Lady's] Bat" or anything else to the "Spectator" or "Athenaeum". Discussion of arrangements for the house. Asks who Sophie, who has offered to give Bob a set of books, is; Bob ought to decide what he would like; asks if he has a complete set of Browning in Smith and Elder's edition; she does not like Meredith enough and the Frys have a set, but if Bob is a great admirer he should ask for that. Hope [Charles] Sanger feels better; asks about Bob's lease on the Temple rooms, and whether he is still keeping daily accounts or whether he has not opened his account book since they 'sat together in Charles' room one morning at Grosvenor Crescent'; does not like to nag but he must think about such things.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Is sorry 'about the wee doggie'; it is very sad but she hopes 'he may recover'. Is sending some game today; the grouse should be eaten first but the pheasants should keep until they return from Stocks [the Wards' country house]. Sir George has recovered, and he and his three friends are 'very happy together'; it is 'too funny sometimes to hear their reminiscences'; Sir George and Lord Belper 'took up an argument just where they left it 41 years ago!'. Mary is here; she and Charles are very happy; she 'certainly improves on acquaintance' and told Caroline that she was 'dreadfully uncomfortable' when staying in August, this is probably what 'made her so abrupt'. Mary is 'enchanted' with the house: they have a 'very tiny one in London' which is not as nice as Cheyne Gardens [George Trevelyan's new house]. Wants to hear what Elizabeth thinks of Cheyne Gardens; they will have fun on Friday and wishes she could be there. Is 'deeply grieved [sic] for Fry's anxiety [about his wife]'. Booa is 'very jealous about the apples & would like to have some'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'my dear Bob'; is very glad to hear from him; was just last week that she left Amsterdam and he went with Paul [Hubrecht?] 'to visit Volendam and buy Dutch cheeses' but it seems a long time ago. Paul wrote a 'rather amusing & ironical account of that day'. He must have had a bad crossing as the weather has been 'most depressing ever since'; 'poor Grandmont is shivering & probably longing to get away', but the coming of Bob's friends the [Roger] Frys will keep them longer. Will miss them very much; Bramine has 'proven to be such a friend', she has told her everything and she is 'a great help'. All her family 'have a somewhat inquisitive if not suspicious turn of mind' and have begun to have suspicions about her and Bob; not in an unkind sense but they want to know 'exactly what happened or did not happen'. Her uncle, aunt, and [cousin] Marie stayed with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] in Amsterdam; is sure they compared notes. Bramine is a help to 'appease their minds'; would also help if Trevelyan wrote a 'collins' to her aunt which will make it 'all look more natural'. She and Bob must continue to be quite 'sincere and truthful' with each other, and 'everything will come right in the end'; scolds him a little for leaving the house without saying goodbye to her uncle or Grandmont, though her family found his absent-midnedness comical.

Is writing in the drawing room, hearing the 'continual tinkle tinkle of the piano' as Grandmont practises some Haydn trios. They spent at the evening recently at the house of the painter [Willem?] Witsen, where Bramine works at her etching every day; played some music and even persuaded Witsen to join them with his cello, though he is 'terribly shy and modest' he plays very well. Has been practising hard herself recently, as she wants to be in good shape if she goes to have lessons from the new teacher in Amsterdam who has replaced her old teacher [Joseph] Cramer. Asks how Bob's new house is getting on; asks its name and address, and when he will move in. He will miss the Frys at first; hopes they like the Dutch cheese, and that it will not be 'like the story of the cheese in [Jerome's] "Three Men in a Boat"'. Is reading Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser], and has given up the Brownings' letters for a while. 'Correspondence is unsatisfactory in so many ways'; wishes she could see more of Bob, though she tells him not to 'interpret this for more than [she means] it'; tells him to write as often and fully as he can. Will try to puzzle over his 'metaphysical quotation', though doubts she will understand it entirely without further explanation; wonders about the value of such questions, though she does greatly admire 'the philosophical turn of mind' as long as it does not hamper any other enquiry. Bramine sends kind regards to Bob; she and Grandmont apparently always speak of him 'by that disrespectful name', so she supposes she may also. Notes in a postscript that he did not tell her how old he is; guesses twenty-seven.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hotel du Luxembourg, Avignon. - There is still time for Trevelyan to send his letters of introduction to Marseilles, as Fry and his wife have 'loafed about a great deal' on the journey south on their honeymoon. Impressions of Avignon. Has begun to draw 'in a lazy sort of way'. Encloses a cheque for wedding costs, and expresses gratitude; it was good of Trevelyan to see them off: unorthodox, but emblematic of the fact that they don't intend to isolate themselves in marriage. Has been reading Theocritus, mostly in translation; would be 'absolutely happy' if he knew Greek and Latin well, but he never will. Trevelyan should not scoff: he does not know what a drunken man's liver looks like and Fry does.

Letter from John Masefield to R. C. Trevelyan

Wolverhampton Art and Industrial Exhibition, 1902, Gresham Chambers, Lichfield Street, Wolverhampton. - Tomorrow morning he will send back "Moll Flanders" and "Celestina", and with them Gorky's "Twenty Six Men and a Girl" which he thinks might interest Trevelyan. There are around three thousand visitors a week to the Gallery, but he will be very glad to get back to London even if it is 'to starvation in garret or suicide on back door-step'; has found 'solitary indolence' very hard, and has been unable to work or think. D. S. MacColl wrote a good notice in the last issue [of the "Saturday Review"?]. Fry has kindly sent him [his book on?] Cellini; thanks Trevelyan for getting him to do so.

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