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Letter from Mark Guy Pearse to F. W. Lawrence

28 Gordon Mansions (W.C.).—Is delighted by the news of his engagement to Vechan (Emmeline Pethick), and looks forward to meeting him.

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Transcript

28 Gordon Mansions.
June 13: 1901

Dear Mr. Lawrence

Vechan has asked me to meet you at 20 Somerset Terrace on Tuesday {1} at four o’clock. I want just to say how great a pleasure it will be to me.

You know something of our relationship—how all her life she has shared with me her thoughts, and her heart. I am glad that this has come to her & to you. I know that she has but one thought, one purpose, one prayer—it is that she may help you live to the highest and largest fulfilment of your best purposes. She accepts her position with almost an awe, seeing the greatness of your life’s possibility. Vechan can never be to me other than she has ever been,—a kind of holy trust. And to me it will be more than a joy, my blessedness if I can serve her still & serve you for her sake.

I am glad you are going to see her amongst the children. You wont know her until you have seen [her] there & amongst the old people of the workhouse. These children, brought up amidst all that tends to hardness & suspicion, find in her such a boundless trust, the atmosphere of such a gladness & sunshine that they are transformed as by a miracle of love.

God bless you. Take care of her whom I call still my Vechan. There is not in the round world another so strong yet so sensitive, so utterly independent yet so glad to be dependent where love is,—holding so much that is counted everything as so little, but all that makes the true life unutterably dear. God made you the happiest of men that she may be the happiest of women.

Yours heartily
M. Guy Pearse

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{1} 18th.

Letter from Emmeline Pethick to F. W. Lawrence

(Place of writing not indicated.)—Praises his work at The Echo* and refers to various items in the press. Has finished the Board Schools today, and is just off to see Miss Montagu.

(Dated Tuesday.)

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Transcript

Tuesday afternoon.

Thank you for your letters dearest[—]am interested in your measures at the Echo—& am quite sure that you have done the right thing—have infinite confidence in the Jew-man Freddy.

Did you see Ouïda’s letter about Olive Schreiner in the D.N this morning? {1}—Is that the truth do you know?—Did you read what the coster said yesterday in the police court—when asked if he had anything to say in answer to the policeman’s evidence (charge of obstructing traffic) “Taint no use, not a bit—He uses the truth so careless.” Rather sweet nicht wahr? & very applicable to affairs in general in these days. The Education question seems to have got a few days reprieve.

Have done the Board Schools today—& am just off to see Miss Montague who has telegraphed for an interview.

It wants Its Freddy a bit—got a headache principally in the backbone: would like the feel of Its Freddy’s big broad shoulder to night—but will take it “by faith”[.] Meantime loves Its Freddy more than a Bit.. This It

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{1} On 16 July 1901 a long letter by the novelist Ouida appeared in the Daily News protesting against Olive Schreiner’s treatment by the British in South Africa.

Letter from Emmeline Pethick to F. W. Lawrence

20 Somerset Terrace, Duke’s Road, W.C.—Reflects on yesterday’s fine weather, and her activities with Pearse and others. Encloses a letter from Newnham, and refers to her proposed purchase of the Dutch House and land for building.

Letter from Emmeline Pethick to F. W. Lawrence

The Green Lady Hostel, Littlehampton.—Sends a review by Chesterton and other information, and asks whether Miss Judge will be coming with him.

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Transcript

The Green Lady Hostel. | Littlehampton.
30. 8. 01.

Freddy—I know you are not very great on the Papers so am sending you one of Chesterton’s reviews—The Mystery of the Mystics {1}. There is something so blade-straight[,] so fresh discerning in this man’s style & in his apprehension: here are some fine sentences worth keeping—especially one that suits the farthest fibre of me—“True spirituality is as humble as a lover and as careless as a schoolboy.”

There is also one other thing that I noted for you—You remember the question that arose between you & Mr Cope on the title of Neville Chamberlain. You were right[—]it is Field Marshal

Does Miss Judge come with you on Saturday morning {2} or later? We shall be a jolly big party. I do hope that we get a cycle ride tomorrow. I am longing to feel myself on that free wheel again!—

Shall think of you this afternoon—hope you’ll get a good game: Sweetheart—Yours

Emmeline.

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{1} A review of Eleanor Gregory’s Introduction to Christian Mysticism, from the same day’s Daily News.

{2} 31st.

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