Showing 334 results

Archival description
Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
Print preview View:

Letter from Arnold Dolmetsch to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Boveney, nr Windsor. - Should have answered her 'kind letter' before, but has been very busy. Had the 'public examination' yesterday in the Bankruptcy Court, which went as well as possible; the trustee advised him to apply for his discharge at once saying he would not oppose it. He therefore hopes to be 'out of all this trouble' soon. Thinks her idea of having lessons on the clavichord 'excellent'; sure she would do well and 'become very fond of the instrument'; it would also be 'very convenient' for the Dolmetschs as the Frys also want to continue their lessons. His wife likes the idea and will write tomorrow suggesting a day. Has not yet made the clavichord key, but will do soon.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

29 Beaufort St., Chelsea, S.W. - Asks when Bob is going to return from 'the fields of Enna' [Sicily] and sing 'songs of Persephone to fit my picture'. Jokingly objects to Bob's 'monstrous insinuations about the girls school' [see 13/1] and says he has been 'practicing fencing every day' to avenge the insult and get exercise. Fences with Hubert Crackanthorpe who has moved in nearby; has decorated the house 'with infinite care' but the way Crackanthorpe has furnished it has 'destroy[ed] all my schemes of colour'. Has a pupil three mornings a week: [Charles] Lacoste is 'quite ignorant but with much talent for a queer type of imaginative design'; thinks he has illustrated Baudelaire very well. Has therefore done little painting himself, only 'drawing with the pupil'; thinks this is good for him and is getting keener than ever on it. Asks how Bob's poetry is going; hopes he 'won't write one in 22 thousand lines like the Indian'. Has been thinking about metre; tells Bob to 'keep [his] hair on', as he begins to see why he is 'so furious about [Robert] Bridges'; tells him not to stay away 'for fear of having to talk about this'.

Notebook

Prose narrative about Coryat's visit to the 'guest-killing mosque at Rai', which shifts to dramatic form for Coryat's encounter with a Stranger who may be Death; story of Coryat continued in pencil, describing his encounter with an old Chinese man and their discussion of will and the spirit.

Two lines of a poetic epistle to Roger [Fry] written after Fry's death; draft account of Helen Fry and her relationship with Roger, probably written to aid Virginia Woolf with her biography of Fry [published in 1940; see also 17/95, 17/96, and 17/97], this includes some unpublished details of Helen Fry's illness such as her fear of her doctor, and the effect of Hubert Crackanthorpe's suicide.

Notebook also used from the other end in: draft verse; another version of Coryat's discussion with the old Chinese man; draft of introduction to the second volume of Trevelyan's "Collected Works", his verse plays; continuation of the 'Coryat' piece, in which the young man is introduced by the Old Man to 'B.R', a 'philosopher and a sceptic' [a hardly disguised Bertrand Russell?, and then reminisces about his childhood friendship with his cousin Miranda; translation of Horace "Satires" 2.3.39-62 and 23 to the end; essay on "Solitude"; essay on Robert Browning; essay on "Juvenilia", which begins by quoting Trevelyan's childhood poem "Oh Hector, I do love thee" [see 23/121/14]; notes for "Simple Pleasures"; notes on bees; short sections of verse, some perhaps translations.

List entitled 'My Friends' on flyleaf, including 'Roger[Fry], Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] and Desmond [MacCarthy]'; list of autobiographical topics written around it and on the inside cover.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Went to see the Duchess [portrait of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, exhibited for sale at Agnews] and came to the same conclusion as Trevelyan [that it was not by Gainsborough: see "Athenaeum", Nov 23 1901, p.766]. Trevelyan is also quite right about the Chigi picture: has written to Binyon about it for the "Northern Chronicle". Is sorry 'it's been such a long & weary business for Bessie' and hopes it's over. Has begun on [the restoration of] Cook's altarpiece.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - The book [Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"] is 'disgusting' and Johnson is to blame for the poor quality reproduction of Fry's illustrations: vows to cut the blocks and oversee the printing himself next time. Helen has taken Julian to Failand and he is staying on a few days to finish a Band of Hope banner for the Hodgkins [his relatives] at Lowick; thinks this is the best thing he's ever done and wishes he could get more work 'on this level of fine decoration' as he loves working within the limits imposed. His watercolours have been successful: three other people tried to buy the Chantilly after Trevelyan. Wishes Trevelyan a happy Christmas and envies him being out of England for it: perhaps they should all spend a winter at Ravello together.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - He and Helen much distressed to hear of Ida Cresswell's marital difficulties: her husband's affair seems insane, but she is brave and will pull through. Is leaning towards beech trees for Trevelyan's picture; will send some ideas of composition soon: thinks he has the pose of the figures. Has finished the second volume of the "Arabian Nights". Has finished Horne's and Mrs Gibson's pictures. The family is well though Julian is upset not to be able to dig outside because of the weather. They have met a 'very nice curate'. They go to Failand on the 27th and then on to Bruge. Saw Entiknapp [Enticknap].

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague'; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Sorry that Bob has a cold; he should 'choose a better way of showing [his] sympathy' with her. Discussion of comforting and sharing things with each other. Bob will have received her uncle's letter; thinks he is right to advise waiting to write to Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] until they hear from 'the Paris oracle' [Mr Barclay; see 9/40]. Hopes Bob has a good Easter with his friends; he must decide whether to go to Salisbury Plain rather than Borrowdale [for their honeymoon] as she does not know either place, and just wants the place to be 'retired from tourists... real country'. Describes Bob's enthusiasm for Flaubert and a performance by him from "La vision de St. Antoine" while they were sitting by the edge of a wood. Charming of [Bob's brothers] Charles and George to think of giving them a box to hold music. Spent a long time yesterday working on her will; it will be almost the same as her sister's. Will go to Amsterdam on Saturday if her cold is better to hear a Brahms chamber concert and have another lesson [with Bram Eldering]. Has read a great deal of "Wuthering Heights"; it is 'tremendously fierce & powerful'. Asks whether Bob has copies of certain books, if so she will leave them behind or give them to someone. The Boers have suffered a great loss with the death of Joubert; asks what the feeling is about it in England. Has had to order more photographs of Bob as she has given so many away. Scolds him for not spelling the name of the place where he lives correctly.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Would like very much to see the plans [for Elizabeth and Robert's new house, being built at Leith Hill]; hopes they will bring them up to London. It will be a busy time, but they must 'set apart an hour'. Asks whether they will be there on the evening of [Charles and Mary's] wedding, 6 January; Annie [Philips] will be staying with them, and Elizabeth and Robert could come to dine and show the plans then. Elizabeth can have her dress sent to Grosvenor Crescent and change there; they must leave by one o'clock. Believes 'Valescure is still very nice'; seems wise not to make a very long journey in January; expects they will come back earlier than usual to 'look after the house'. George has a cold, and they had a very quiet Christmas day; '[Charles Augustus?] Fitch and a game of whist in the evening being the high water mark of festivity'. Very distressed about [Roger] Fry [over his wife's illness]. Hopes Elizabeth got the pheasants by Christmas day. Very sorry 'the doggie did not recover'. Is reading James's Life of Story ["William Wetmore Story and His Friends"] which is 'in its way quite delightful' and 'makes one long to be in Rome'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Trin[ity College, Cambridge]. - Was sent an invitation for Bob from [Charles?] Pope to play in the '[Harrow] Old Boy's match' on 21 October by mistake, and 'by an even greater mistake' has torn it up. Hears occasional news of Bob and his 'ménage'; asks when he is coming for a visit. The exhibition is 'a great success', with 'all the mode[s]t virtues and staring faults of the impressionists well-represented'; [Roger] Fry's pictures 'are among the most generally liked'. Some of the paintings 'are very good, and all interesting'; George went to an 'advertisement debate' about them yesterday at Wallstein's [sic: Charles Waldstein], for the Walpole Society.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

1 All Souls Place, Portland Place, W. - Thanks Trevelyan for the copy of the "Birth of Parsifal"; has not had time during term to re-read it, but Trevelyan read it to him in MS. Apologises for asking, in return, whether Trevelyan could help any further with funds for the "Independent Review" [an enclosure mentioned is now missing]. Roger [Fry] has just returned from the US, where he has been meeting Pierpoint Morgan and almost accepted a post [Fry did eventually take up this post, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]. Fry, Helen [his wife], and Dickinson think of going to Spain at Easter.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence. - Asks if he can borrow about £250 to buy two pictures he has found in Venice and believes to be two of Jacopo Bellini's lost pieces for the Scuola [Grande di San Giovanni Evangelista], which he wants to secure for the National Gallery. Cannot expect Poynter to buy them. Horne has seen photographs and agrees they are worth the money; if Fry cannot sell them at cost price to the National Gallery Trevelyan will share in any profit. Postscript notes that he has found two more Jacopos in a gallery.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Bob's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] came out just after everyone had left Cambridge, but George will do 'all [he] can for it next term'. Likes it 'so very much', and has ordered six copies to give as presents. Thinks Roger [Fry's] illustrations 'very romantic and beautiful', and that they 'illustrated and explained & enlarged the idea of the poems a great deal'. Discusses the poems; thinks "The [Lady's] Bat" 'much the best thing' Bob has done, and 'in the way the most serious'. Lord Rosebery's speech 'a funny business': he 'said things that any Pro Boer would have been lynched for saying' after criticising pro-Boers 'more strongly than anyone'; George hopes what he says will 'get into common parlance'. Says that he himself 'went mad for two months last autumn... and saw men as idiots walking'; he wrote 'an exceedingly mad article... in which a lot of truth was buried in a hopeless amount of bunkum'; hopes Bob will not judge him on it if he sees it.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Failand House, Failand, Nr Bristol. - Trevelyan should not show that he is hurt to Mariechen [Mary Berenson: see also 4/49 and 4/51] and everything will 'fizzle out'. Thursday will probably be too early to meet:they will have just returned with the children and Helen will be busy with the new nurse from Failand. Suggest they meet on Friday in London: Fry is going to Carfax's to see the Sargent pictures.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Dorking. - Asks why Trevelyan thought he might have died: did he see the death of Fry the bookmaker in an Italian paper? Was in fact not at all well yesterday. The children have had measles and the weather is dreadful: is determined not to spend another winter in Britain. They have taken the house at Hampstead [22 Willow Road] but the landlord is making difficulties about allowing alterations. The Piero di Cosimo scheme has fallen though.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Dorking. - Is well again now: it was noble of Bessie not to tell Trevelyan. Helen was a little troubled by the wire and letter. The measles is passing: Julian is almost well, but his sister who came to help nurse has come down with it now. The new landlord [for 22 Willow Road, Hampstead] is still making difficulties. Envies Trevelyan for being in Ravello: he wishes he had the courage to 'chuck England' and live cheaply in Italy: 'sunshine is more important than society'. Loathes art criticism more and more and longs to create. Has nearly done Cook's picture, then will turn to Trevelyan's Claude. He and Helen are reading slowly through [Henry James's] "The Wings of the Dove". Their regards to all at the Palumbo.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's book ["Polyphemus and other poems"] has come; it is 'very pretty and elegant'. Feels that [Roger Fry's] illustrations generally suit 'the spirit of the poetry'. Has begun reading, and was 'much charmed' with the opening of "Polyphemus". He and Caroline are very pleased by the dedication. Sends love to Bessie and asks to be remembered to Professor [Ambrosius] and Mrs Hubrecht, whose address, Janskirkhof Utrecht, is 'delightfully sounding'.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

1 All Souls Place, Portland Place, W. - Rather surprised by news of Trevelyan's engagement; general thoughts on marriage; is sure Trevelyan has chosen well and looks forward to meeting his fiancé. It is good that she is a musician. Roger [Fry] has returned, and he thinks of going to see him. Still not certain whether Ferdinand [Schiller] will return to India or not, 'so my life is hanging in the balance too'. Fears he cannot share Roger's interest in pictures; the only picture he cares for in the U.C.A.C. is Fry's 'Pool'. Asks if he Trevelyan has read Stephen Phillips' 'Paolo and Francesca'. Hopes he has a good time in Ravello.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Road, Hampstead. - Is glad Trevelyan is back: the Frys will be at the Carfax Gallery around 2.30 but it will be best for him to come round to dinner to see the house. Hopes he will be able to see Fry's show [at the Carfax]: Marsh and Lytton [Strachey, or Sir Neville Bulwer-Lytton?] have bought many things; hopes his friends do not think the show is 'a polite form of passing round the hat'. Greets Bessie. Is sad not to be near the Trevelyans: perhaps the Frys will persuade them to move to Hampstead.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Road, Hampstead. - Apologises for the rebuke Trevelyan has received from Mariechen [Mary Berenson; see also 4/45 and 4/51]: Trevelyan was indiscreet, but only 'delightfully and charmingly', and Fry should not have told Mary he knew B.B's attitude towards him. '[T]hese people' pretend not to mind anything and then 'change the rules of the game'. What Trevelyan told Fry about the Jacopo Bellini's did no harm as he knew it already. He and Helen had a good time in France despite the weather; they particularly enjoyed Laon: the view reminds him of something by Pater on Kominck [?]. They go to Failand on Monday to collect the children and return on Thursday.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Is glad Bob thinks 'as strongly about what is called English "Patriotism" just now' as they do; it is certainly 'a lamentable affair' and war seems unavoidable. Bramine [Hubrecht] was shocked when she read her Bob's wish for a 'fiasco, not so much for the sake of the Boers as for our own' as she 'feels very strongly for the Boers'. Read full account of the Trafalgar Square meeting the morning before Bob's letter came; was startled to hear he had been there as the newspaper account was nowhere near 'as dull & pacific' as he found it. Bramine has just brought her a letter from Mrs [Helen] Fry to Bob, which she should have given to him on his arrival; hopes this has not caused him or the Frys any inconvenience. Asks if the 'Japanese melodrama' was any good, and whether he is still in London. Suggests he uses foreign paper for his letters; his last was over-weight; makes a pun about his letters becoming 'too dear' for her. His letter is 'very valuable to her... whatever the future may have in store'. Wishes they could see each other more often, but does not think they should 'force circumstances'; admits she is a 'muddled creature' and does not yet see what is right and what she feels; hopes she will get clearer, while Bob is 'noble & generous & will wait', which she thinks is better for both their sakes. Discusses a line from Balzac. Will ask for more reading suggestions when she has finished the ones she wants to read; has just finished [Joseph] Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser] and 'worship[s] him all the more'. Bob is also a 'shrewd guesser of age', as she turned twenty-four on May 21st. Always used to be thought older than she was till a few years ago when the reverse became true. Thinks it is comical how few people, especially women, are 'perfectly natural' about their age; asks if Bob has 'often had the benefit of women in society and friendship'. Last week she and her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht] went to see "Citio", at Doorn, where they are to go next summer; it is smaller than the one at Ede but nicely situated and they wil probably like it. The Grandmonts are to leave by the end of next week; the Röntgens are coming for the day next Sunday to 'say farewell to Ede. She [Mien Röntgen] was married from this house'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Bob's sonnet is 'delightful'. Suggests an alteration to the last line which makes it 'as topical, sublime, mysterious, & has the egoism proper to a great poet'; but seriously he 'must do something big' since this shows so 'complete a mastery of technique'. He and Helen will be at [a concert given by Charles?] Lamoureux on Friday and says they must meet up afterwards and dine at Gambrinus [Ye Olde Gambrinus, a restaurant/beer hall on Regent St] or something'. His wedding [to Helen Coombe] is on 3 December at 2 pm. Invites Bob to come and sit for his portrait and stay a night or two, not for long as 'everything is topsy turvy' and Mrs Smith [the housekeeper] getting progressively more worried; on second thoughts Bob had better not come as she has to 'clear all the things out and send them to Howard [?]'. The "Daphnis & Chloe" [a copy of the work by Longus?] has come and is 'splendid'; asks Robert to 'write a little epithalamium' and put it at the beginning; they are both very grateful.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hotel de la Place, Veules, Seine Inférieure. - Asks about Trevelyan's new home: Roundhurst sounds 'almost baronial', and Fry does not think it is time for 'another Abbotsbury & mediaeval revival', though a mail coat 'like Mr Chainmail' [in Thomas Love Peacock's "Crotchet Castle"] would suit him. He and Helen are both very happy; they are reading [Flaubert's] "Bouvard & Pécuchet" together and he is reading Wilhelm Meister in French translation. They drank a bottle of wine last night in honour of Trevelyan's letter (cider is their usual drink) and Helen vowed to dive headfirst into the sea if the weather was calm: she did this today to much admiration. It was very hot in Italy, and hard to travel; they have come to France to 'get fat'. Describes their time in Venice, where they both did much work; they then stopped at Padua, Vicenza, Verona, Brescia, Bergamo, and Saronno; Fry got to know the Verona and Vicenza artists. Has done a lot of studies, and has started to think about Trevelyan's fan [?]. Is delighted Trevelyan wants to buy his picture ["The Valley of the Seine"] which he thinks the best thing he has done so far. Does not agree about [Thomas Sturge] Moore's "Woodstock Maze". Asks about Pan in Trevelyan's 'fan poem', with a sketch of the god. Is sorry Cyclops has 'escaped' Trevelyan [a reference to Trevelyan's "Polyphemus"?]. Is not sure whether he can take up the invitation to Wallington: may go to Newton [Newton Hall, home of the Widdrington family] to alter some of his portraits there and give some lectures in Newcastle but his plans are vague: depends on how quickly they find a house. Trevelyan must visit them after his trip to Bayreuth.

A paragraph written and signed by Helen Fry in the middle of the letter thanks Trevelyan for his letter and assures him that she and Roger are happy and 'just the same'; she is glad he likes Roger's picture.

Letter from Robert Oswald Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington. - Never sent Trevelyan the copy of the Bat [his poem"The Lady's Bat] for him to correct. Grant Richards wants to start printing ["The Bird In Song", see 6/47] at once; if Trevelyan cannot return the enclosed in time, they will take the punctuation from Brimley Johnson's book. Still trying to find a title; if Trevelyan can think of one which is 'pretty but not too elaborate' he will offer him 'half the royalty that G.R. has not offered' [him and Stanley Makower]. Has just discovered that F. Noel Paton brought out "Bards and the Birds" in 1894, but this is not well done. Hopes Roger [Fry] will buy all the Old Masters 'that are good enough for Boston but not too good'. Stanley is well as is his baby daughter.

Letter from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

2 Rue St Martin, Neauphle-leChateau, (S[eine] et O[ise]) [from envelope). - Apologises for not replying sooner to Trevelyan's letter: being in the country he has been working very hard, although has not therefore done anything which has satisfied him. Did not see [Francis] Birrell at all: he cannot come to Marchand's house without Marchand knowing. Marchand left at the end of May and came to a 'little place' in the Isle de France, Neauphle-le-Château. Sonia [Lewitska] is already doing better than she was in Paris but she still has a lot to do to recover completely. He 'regenerates himself as well as he can, without having found the ardour of the past': believes the last five years will 'weigh heavily' on their 'much-maltreated generation'. Vignier [?] is 'always equal to himself', and claims in fact to surpass himself as he is working hard to progress without a pause. Saw Miss Deacon twice during her stay at Paris, but in a very unexpected way. Regrets that he has not received Roger Fry's article, and so has not thanked him, but hopes to send soon to send Fry an almanac he has illustrated in collaboration with several artists. Hopes to come to London some time around November; will be very pleased to meet Trevelyan's wife and 'young amateur of landscapes' [Julian], who seems typically English to him as he has often noticed that the English have a 'predilection' for this genre of painting. Sonia has finished her woodcuts for the Joinville [Jean de Joinville, "Le Livre des Saintes Paroles et des bons faits de Notre Saint Roi Louis"], and they both send best wishes to both Trevelyans. Adds a postscript that he does not have many details about his exhibition [at the Carfax Gallery?]: asks whether it was not 'too disparate' despite the range of periods it covered.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Road, Hampstead, N.W. - The Frys have had to give up the idea of coming to Guildford due to Pamela's ill health; Helen is very low as it seems the children will never be well. Invites Trevelyan to visit when next in town. Is much enjoying [Gregorio] Leti's life of Sixtus V. The 'little fracas' with the Berensons is happily settled [see also 4/45 and 4/49].

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Agrees with Bob that he should not come over till mid-May, and does not think her uncle seriously wishes him to come earlier; does not understand why he is having friends to stay and going visiting again if he wants to get some more work done, but is glad he is going to see them. Thinks there will be plenty of time for business or visiting; they might go to Utrecht, Amsterdam and Rotterdam, and would love to go with him to Heerde in Gelderland where her sister [Henriette] lives; will have to go there to see the children and her husband the doctor before she leaves, though her sister is probably coming to the wedding. Does not know where Bob left the bed catalogue; thinks she remembers seeing it last in Charles's room at Grosvenor Crescent; asks if they can order a softer mattress. Will measure her Dutch pillowcases tomorrow and send him the measurements; further discussion of fittings and furniture, and arrangements for packing and unpacking her things. Bob should ask his mother about what tie he should wear with his frock coat; Dutch husbands always wear white tie with their evening dress; thinks blue or green suit him if he is to choose a coloured tie. If the patent boots he wore to Roger [Fry]'s wedding are still good he can wear them again. Hopes he will soon hear from Mrs Pepper; 'what a name for a honeymoon lady!!'. Spent two nights at Almelo which were enjoyable but so hot she had difficulty sleeping; Jeanne [Salamonson Asser] very kindly tried to 'read her to sleep out of "Pilgrim's Progress"'. Then went to Amsterdam, where she helped Mien [Röntgen] arrange the flowers and table, before they went to the [Joachim] concert which was 'delightful beyond words'; they did a Haydn, Brahms and a Beethoven quartet. Then they returned for the supper party, at which '[Bob's] friend young Harold Joachim, the Oxford fellow' was present; he sat next to her at supper and seems a 'very nice fellow'; they had met once before at St Andrews when she thought him 'a strange odd person & was in great awe of him'. Thinks Harold wants her and Bob to come and see them at Haslemere when 'Uncle Jo' is staying with them; Bessie was at school with his sister. Tomorrow the quartet are in the Hague, and Harold is crossing by night so she has invited him to lunch. When healths were being drunk at the end of the meal and she went up to Joachim to touch glasses, he at once proposed 'Ihr Bräutigam' ['Your bridegroom']; he remembered that Bob's father had once taken him home in his carriage. On Tuesday she went to see her 'socialist sister [Theodora] and her husband [Herman Heijenbrock]' on their farm and enjoyed her day with them more than she had expected to; they are very happy together and she admires their convictions though they do not convince her.

Returns to the letter next day, before going to meet [Alice and Herbert] Jones. Is sure Bob would be 'amused' to meet the socialist couple, but he [Heijenbrock] does not know English so it would be no good. Then went to stay with the aunt who lives nearby; she is not a 'favourite' in their house and they do not see her often, but several of her sisters see her often; the aunt was very friendly but it is never pleasant to be there. Fortunately her daughter, Bessie's cousin, was also there. Found her uncle and aunt fairly well when she returned, but the house is in 'a horrible state' due to the repainting, and they both have a slight cold. Went to the station to meet the Jones and they did not appear; English visitors 'always change their plans at the last minute or miss trains... or don't wire in time' as is the case for the Joneses, who are now coming tomorrow. [Harold] Joachim also cannot come to lunch and is calling in the afternoon. [Joseph] Joachim is staying tonight with Mr [Nicolaas] Pierson, the Finance Minister, and his wife, who has invited Bessie to a select party this evening. Is going to the concert tomorrow night with Alice Jones; the Röntgens may also come. The cellist [Robert] Hausmann is 'a charming person, so refined and artistic'; talked to him the other night and he admired Bob's ring. Bob will get this letter when he comes up to London to see his father. She thinks he should bring any work she has not seen on their honeymoon, as they might not have much quiet time before the wedding. Understands that his 'literary ambition is not connected with [his] love' and thinks this is right. Last half page with pillowcase measurements.

Results 181 to 210 of 334