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Miscellaneous manuscript fragments removed from books in Trinity College Library

36 fragments, eight of them carrying notes as to which volumes they had been removed from. The group include two English fragments of the versified life of St Catherine (items 1-2), a 13th century fragment from the end of the Joseph story of the Poème Anglo-Normand sur l'Ancien Testament, removed from shelfmark K.3.77 (item 3), two fragments from the Avignon Selichot (items 7-8), two fragments from a medical text in Latin (items 9-10), a fragment on civil and canon law (item 17), and a fragment removed from Dr Hooke's papers carrying the header "Regulae Cromocritica de [Urina?]" inscribed by W. Derham as "Turkish writings & other Rhapsodical Receipts" (item 23).

Additional Manuscripts c

  • Add.MS.c
  • Fonds
  • [c13th-20th cent.]

The additional manuscript series are artificial groupings, mostly of single items or very small archival entities, but in some cases large archives have been inserted in these series.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Miscellaneous papers

On the front is stamped ‘ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS & PAPERS.’ The docu-ments are accompanied by folded sheets of blue paper bearing descriptions of the documents, in which they were evidently kept before they were bound.

Sandars, Samuel (1837–1894), librarian and benefactor

Cullum Collection

  • CULL
  • Collection
  • 15th-20th cent

George Gery Milner-Gibson-Cullum's collection of autographs. The correspondence of Cullum's parents with notable contemporaries provided the core of the collection, but he amassed autographs from far beyond this sphere. The collection includes many examples from the royal and noble houses of Europe, of European politicians and Presidents of the USA, of Popes and senior members of the Church and of actors, authors, writes and composers.

Cullum, George Gery Milner-Gibson- (1857–1921), antiquary

Note of a fine, relating to places in Norfolk

Note of a fine between (A) John Hastynggis, son of Edward Hastynggis, knight, John Heydon, Richard Suthwell, Henry Spelman, and William Stather, clerk, plaintiffs, and (B) Roger Drury, esquire, and his wife Anne, deforciants, of the manors of Yaxham, ‘Cursones’, ‘Gerbrigges’, ‘Reppes’, and ‘Ilneys’, in Yaxham, East Dereham, Westfield, Whinburgh, Garveston, and Mattishall, and three tofts, 100a. of (arable) land, 10a. of meadow, 15a. of pasture, 5a. of wood, and 11s. of rent in Yaxham, all in Norfolk.

(The correct term for this document is uncertain, but Halliwell-Phillipps uses the term ‘note of a fine’ to describe two similar documents in Outlines of the Life of Shakespeare, 10th ed. (1898), ii. 11, 25; and ‘The note of the fine, or, abstract of the original contract’ is the fourth of the five parts of a fine enumerated by Jacob in his New Law Dictionary (1772), sig. 5C3.)

—————

Transcript

Inter Iohannem Hastynggis filium et heredem Edwardi Hastynggis Militis Iohannem Heydon’ Ricardum Suthwell’ Henricum Spelman’ et Willelmum Stather Clericum querentes et Rogerum Drury Armigerum et Annam vxorem eius deforciantes de Maneriis de Yaxham Cursones Gerbrigges Reppes et Ilneys cum pertinencijs in Yaxham Estderham Westfeld’ Whynbergh’ Gerston’ et Mateshale ac de tribus toftis Centum acris terre decem acris prati quindecim acris pasture quinque acris bosci et vndecim solidatis redditus cum pertinencijs in Yaxham vnde placitum conuencionis summonitus fuit inter eos et cetera Scilicet quod predicti Rogerus et Anna recognouerunt predicta Maneria et tenementa cum pertinencijs esse jus ipsius Willelmi vt illa que ijdem Willelmus Iohannes Iohannes Ricardus et Henricus habent de dono predictorum Rogeri et Anne Et illa remiserunt et quietumclamauerunt de ipsis Rogero et Anna et heredibus ipsius Anne predictis Iohanni Iohanni Ricardo Henrico et Willelmo et heredibus ipsius Willelmi imperpetuum Et preterea ijdem Rogerus et Anna concesserunt pro se et heredes ipsius Anne quod ipsi warantizabunt predictis Iohanni Iohanni Ricardo Henrico et Willelmo et heredibus ipsius Willelmi predicta Maneria et tenementa cum pertinencijs contra omnes homines imperpetuum Et pro hac recognitione remissione quietaclamancia warantia fine et concordia ijdem Iohannes Iohannes Ricardus Henricus et Willelmus dederunt predictis Rogero et Anne ducentas marcas Argenti

[In the margin:] Norff’
De Crastino purificationis beate Marie Anno regnorum Edwardi Regis Anglie et Francie quarti A conquestu sextodecimo {1} [braced to] Ingr’

Dies datus est eis de Capiendo cyrographo suo A die pasche in xv dies Anno xvijmo {2}

—————

The original capitalisation has been retained. Most abbreviations have been expanded.

{1} 3 Feb. 1477.
{2} 20 Apr. 1477.

Manuscript collection of the third Baron Rothschild

  • ROTH
  • Collection
  • 16th-19th centuries

The collection consists of the manuscript collection of the third Baron Rothschild, much of which was purchased at auction. The majority of items are 18th-century literary works with a particular emphasis on Swift.

Rothschild, Nathaniel Mayer Victor (1910–1990), 3rd Baron Rothschild, zoologist and public servant

Crewe Manuscripts

  • Crewe MS
  • Collection
  • 16th–20th centuries

The collection includes manuscripts in various European languages, dating from the sixteenth century to the twentieth. Most of them are, broadly speaking, of a literary, historical, or religious nature, but it is not easy to summarise the range of subjects they cover. They include, for instance, from the seventeenth century, notarial instruments in French relating to Charlotte de Beaune, an English translation of Den Spegel der Gherechticheit by Hendrik Niclaes of the so-called ‘Family of Love’, and a collection of English court poetry; from the eighteenth, papers on British trade, literary copyright, notorious criminals, and the French revolution; and from the nineteenth, a collection of papers and prints relating to the history of ballooning, items collected by Richard Burton on his travels, and a series of volumes recording the transactions of the Philobiblon Society.

Milnes, Richard Monckton (1809–1885), 1st Baron Houghton, author and politician

Papers of William Whewell

  • WHWL*
  • Fonds
  • [16th]-19th cent.

The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, writings, other Whewell papers, family papers, and later papers of others. The family papers include those originally gathered by Whewell's first wife Cordelia (née Marshall) and his second wife Lady Affleck (née Ellis). The papers of Lady Affleck's brother and Whewell's friend Robert Leslie Ellis now form a subset of this collection.

Whewell, William (1794–1866), college head and writer on the history and philosophy of science

Manuscripts in Wren Class R

  • R.
  • Fonds
  • 16th–20th c.

Class R is the Wren Library repository of manuscripts for all those works which could not be classed as theological. As a consequence, the class is a miscellaneous assortment representing many fields, particularly history, poetry, philosophy, law, natural science, medicine, and music. The contents of Class R were described in 1901 by M. R. James in the preface to volume II of his catalogue of Western manuscripts in Trinity College Library, which may be viewed online: https://mss-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk/manuscripts/uv/view.php?n=vol.2#?c=0. A searchable version of the James catalogue may be found online: https://mss-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk/

The manuscripts listed in this catalogue are those modern manuscripts in R with strong connections to materials housed elsewhere in the library, particularly in Additional Manuscripts. Where James did not provide a description in his catalogue, a description has been provided. Where the James catalogue entry is detailed, a pointer record has been created in this catalogue to highlight the entry in the James catalogue. It should be noted that there are gaps in the numbering scheme of items on the shelves, and that the cataloguing of these materials is a work in progress.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

William Whewell papers: Cordelia Whewell autograph collection, A-L

The first of two boxes of an autograph collection begun by Cordelia Whewell, and continued after her death, possibly by Lady Affleck, and William Whewell's executors.

Most of the autographs date from the 18th and 19th century, but there is one 16th century letter from William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley to Sir Robert Petre (item 18) and four other 17th century letters and documents, including a letter from William Cecil, Viscount Cranborne to his father the Earl of Salisbury in 1607 (Add.MS.c.66/38). A group of eight letters from French statesmen dating from the 1660s and 1670s (items 2, 29, 33, 98, 104, 110 and Add.MS.c.66/39-40) are accompanied by an undated letter from Louis XIV (item 108).

There is some evidence of the different stages of the collection, with what may have formed the nucleus of the original collection, letters written to Cordelia's parents Mr and Mrs John Marshall, many of them replies to invitations. More concerted collecting efforts are evidenced in letters from E. M. James (Items 84-85) and R. V. Swaine (Add.MS.c.66/59) to Cordelia, which originally enclosed autographs for the collection; these are linked to the letters listed therein. The collection was added to after Cordelia's death: letters postdate her death in 1855, and there are a number of Ellis family letters and documents, which may have been added by Lady Affleck (née Ellis). These include a copy of the codicil to the will of Henry Ellis, dated 10 June 1774 (Item 44). A letter written eight years after William Whewell's death by his executor J. L. Hammond (Item 68) encloses autographs for the 'College Collection' but they are neither enclosed with the letter nor elsewhere in this collection.

Whewell, Cordelia (1803-1855) wife of William Whewell

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of £3 4s. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to Yorkshire to deliver a letter to the ‘costomere’ ther, and for returning ‘with lyche [like] spede’ to London. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt. ‘I was xxiiij dayes in thys Jorney.’

(Marked ‘fiat Alloc[atum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of £5 16d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to Cheshire and Lancashire, as far as Hornby Castle, to deliver letters to the collectors in those shires. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt. ‘I was out xxxviij dayes in thys same Jorney.’

(Marked ‘fiat Alloc[atum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of £5 16d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to Bedford and Buckingham to deliver ten letters to the lords and collectors there, and from thence to Warwickshire to deliver seven letters to the lords and collectors there, and from thence to Nottingham and Derby to deliver four letters to the lords and collectors there, and from thence to Staffordshire to deliver four letters to the lords and collectors there and a packet to the sheriff of that place, and from thence to Shropshire to deliver three letters to the collector there. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt at Westminster. ‘I was xxxviij dayes out in thys Jorney.’

(Marked ‘fiat All[ocatum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Robert Kitcheman for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Robert Kitcheman, one of the ordinary messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of 26s. 8d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to ‘Pesnell’ [Peasenhall] in Suffolk to deliver a writ to Sir Owen Hopton, sheriff of Suffolk and Norfolk, and for returning to London ‘with like hast’. Kitcheman asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt at Westminster. ‘I was out in this Jorney the space of x Dayes.’

(Marked ‘fiat All[ocatum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of 26s. 8d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to deliver letters to Mr Dawbeny [probably Christopher Daubeney] at ‘Shyryngton’ [Sharrington], 20 miles beyond Norfolk, [and for returning to London?—the text is unclear]. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt. ‘I was owt In thys Jorney x days.’

(Marked ‘fiat Alloc[atum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Account of money payable to Gilbert Gerard and Richard Onslow, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester and Walter Mildmay, and directed to Humphrey Shelton and the tellers of the Receipt

£66 13s. 4d. is to be allowed to Gilbert Gerard, attorney general, and to Richard Onslow, solicitor general, for their work in ‘drawinge of bookes’ and attendance in connection with the suit between between the Queen and the Earl of Northumberland concerning copper, gold, and silver mines [the ‘Case of Mines’], in which judgement was given for the Queen, and also for their work in another matter relating to the College of Llandinbrevie(?) [this is the apparent reading], in which judgement was also given for the Queen.

(Headed ‘At the liberate Termino Trinitatis anno Decimo Regine Elizabeth’’. In the hand of an amanuensis. Signed by Winchester and Mildmay.)

Letter from the Marquess of Winchester and Walter Mildmay to [an officer of the Receipt of the Exchequer?]

John Gill had a lease from Queen dated 4 Mar. 1563, by which he was granted, among other things, a tenement late in the occupation of John Bingley in Over Trelabe, Cornwall, part of the manor of Carmedon Prior, and another tenement late in the occupation of John Shere in Nethertrelabe, part of the manor of Clemeslande [Climsland] Prior, Cornwall. The yearly rent of the two tenements is 56s. 2d. and the fine is equivalent to four years’ rent, i.e. £11 4s. 8d. Gill having surrendered his interest in these tenements, the Queen, being petitioned for them, has granted them by letters patent dated 18 Nov. 1564 to William Sheres, in reversion for 31 years [see the Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1563–1566, p. 342]. The correspondent is therefore directed to repay Gill or the bringer of the letter £11 4s. 8d., and take an acquittance in return.

(In the hand of an amanuensis. Signed by Winchester and Mildmay. Examined by Christopher Smyth, clerk of the pipe.)

Letter from the Marquess of Winchester and Walter Mildmay to Richard Stanley, one of the tellers of the Receipt

Humphrey Shelton, auditor of the Receipt, has worked diligently in his reckonings with the tellers, and they are now brought to ‘good and perfecte order’. It has come to light that one annuity of £40 a year, granted by the house of St John of Jerusalem for thirty years to Thomas Hennage, gentleman, has been paid for 4½ years after the end of the term, and that another annuity of £20 a year granted by Queen Mary to Edmund Beningfild, gentleman, for the term of his life, has been paid for three years after his death. A total of £240 is therefore to be paid back to the Queen. In consideration of these discoveries and of Shelton’s diligence and service they have allowed him £60. Stanley is to pay Shelton this sum and obtain a quittance in return.

(In the hand of an amanuensis. Signed by Winchester and Mildmay.)

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