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Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Thinks that his illness was due to something he ate. Declares that he enjoyed his visit to [London], and sent an account of the visit to [ ]. Reports that Mr Wheatley [his godfather] was very kind to the. Declares that he would like to see Miss Green [his former governess] if his mother can induce her to stay until he [and his brother William] come home. Refers to his mother's advice about his chess playing and assures her that he has not played more that five games 'since the beginning of the quarter...' Asks her to buy something for [his friend] Harry James out of his money. Explains how they were 'got into the 2nd class in German', and in relation to the play declares that they do not have to translate it themselves. Sends his love to all at home, 'including Elizabeth [Cooper]'.

Letter from Eleanor Mildred Balfour to Mary Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter. Is unable to express her own happiness, and how much she wishes to be a good wife to Henry and a good daughter to her; looks forward to getting to know her.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Cambridge]:- Regrets that he cannot accept his Aunt [Henrietta?] Croft's invitation as he is engaged every morning from 8 to 2. Hopes to be able to go over to Bedford sometime, but it must be in vacation time. Talks of arrangements for meeting in winter, but announces that he wishes to spend the last month of the vacation in Cambridge learning Hebrew. Reports on Arthur's health and states that he is very cheerful and jolly. Hopes that William is coming to stay with him at the end of term. Comments on the weather, which had turned that day into 'what foreigners call "English weather".' Remarks that he was often taken for a Londoner in Germany. Reports that he is engaged now six hours a day 'in pure talking', and teaches for two hours a week at the Working Men's College; amongst others there, he instructs 'a converted Jew in the rudiments of Latin', who was 'brought by a queer enthusiastic Syrian traveller' whom they have among their fellows. Sends his love to his aunt and uncle [William and Stephana], and sends Arthur's love to his mother.

Letters from Nora and Henry Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Nora remarks on how sad it is that her and Henry's quiet time [in Paris on their honeymoon] is coming to an end, and how quickly the time has passed, but how long it seems since their wedding day. They go to Rouen the following day and then by Amiens to Calais, from where they will cross the channel back to England. They must be at Carlton Gardens the following Tuesday as Henry must look over some examination papers. They go to Cambridge on the following Friday for one day and return to London until the Monday following when they settle at Cambridge.

If the following day is as delightful as that day they may stay on in Paris 'till the last minute', because it 'does look lovely in the sun, with the fresh green trees, and the chestnuts just coming into flower'. They have been two or three times 'to the play, and enjoyed the excellent acting very much': last night they heard Racine's Athalie, and found it dull, but there were 'two very good little comedies afterwards'.

Henry writes that he is sorry to hear that William has been so depressed; hopes that the change will do him good, and that he will come over to Cambridge as soon as possible. Undertakes to write to him in the next couple of days. In relation to his mother's 'Munificent offer', states that Nora says that they have no breakfast service, dinner service, glass or cruet stand; they would be very grateful if she were to give them any of these. They have looked at the china shops in Paris, but prefer London pottery. Is sure that the crest sent to Arthur Balfour [see 105/9] was satisfactory. Notes on Saturday, 22 April that the morning is 'perfectly Lovely, and it is Madness to leave Paris, but Nora has an extravagant passion for church architecture, and is carrying [him] off to Rouen.' They will cross the channel on the following Monday or Tuesday, and have arranged to be at 4 Carlton Gardens on Tuesday; will write again from there.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to inform her that he shall come on the following Wednesday. Reports that he shall be staying with Mrs Clough from Monday to Wednesday if his cold does not get worse. Claims that he accepted her invitation gladly, as there is a new edition of Clough's Remains passing through the press, and he would like to talk to her about it. Intends to speak to his mother about Mr Horton and other matters on Wednesday evening, 'before Edward and Mary come'.

Asks if she has heard from William, and states that he has not found time to write to him yet. Asks her opinion on Noel's poems. Refers to the review of them in the Athenaeum, and states that Noel has told him that the two great critics of the age, M. Arnold and S[aint] Beuve, 'have both expressed themselves pleased by the book.' Reports that he has 'got rid of' his last pupil and is writing a paper for his philological journal. Reports that Patterson's book on Hungary is very nearly finished, and that he has seen most of it, and thinks that it will be both worth reading and readable.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he has been very busy. Remarks on 'Edward's boy [a student from Edward Benson's school, Wellington College?]' having been elected for a minor scholarship at Trinity College, and that he had written to Bradley to tell him of the faults of a boy of his who had been elected minor scholar. Observes that Bradley and Temple 'continue banging affectionately at each other in the Times.' Looks forward to vacation, but is sure that hard work is good for him on the whole. Reports that the weather is splendid. Wonders whether their 'usual concourse of May visitors will go on increasing' as it has in the previous few years. Predicts that the typical Cambridge man 'will be an antiquarian personage who knows about the history of the colleges and is devoted to "Culture des ruines"as the French pamphleteer said.' Refers to his friend Mozley having produced his article on Modern Poets in the Quarterly Review, and fears that it is dull. Believes that he ranks Clough high, and is glad 'as it will astonish the old-fashioned readers of the Quarterly. They will regard the editor as a literary Disraeli marching with his age'. States that he enquired about Christ's Hospital for 'young [Fred] Horton', but found that he was much too old.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Announces that he has just resigned from his assistant tutorship and has informed the authorities that he intends to resign his fellowship very soon. Remarks that it is not impossible that they may appoint him lecturer in spite of his actions, but he does not expect them to do so. Advises her that the matter is a secret. Reports that the Master 'expressed himself very kindly about [Henry] in communicating [his] resignation to the College.' Remarks that everyone is very kind, and believes that if he is not reappointed 'it will not be from want of goodwill, but from a conviction that the interests of the College do not allow it.'. Claims to be happy, and believes that he has done the right thing.

Asks her to tell Arthur that he thinks they had on the whole, successful meetings at the Free Christian Union. States that Paul's sermon was very good, and is misrepresented in the Pall Mall Gazette. Reports that he has been staying with Mrs Clough, whom he likes 'very much' and that 'the new book' [The Poems and Prose Remains of Arthur Hugh Clough] is due out in about two weeks. Announces that he will come down to his mother about the end of the month or the following month. States that if she has Miss [Alice?] Horton staying with her, or if there is any other particular reason, he does not mind coming, however his hay fever is.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that Professor Conington, who is a Life Governor has placed a Marlborough nomination at his disposal, and that she may tell Mr Horton if she wishes. Advises her, however, that if the boy [Fred] does not do well enough to get the scholarship it will probably be not worth while for Horton to send him there. States that he intends the £30 annually for two years had better be spent in some other way, i.e., in giving the boy a decent education. With regard to Miss [Alice] Horton, suggests that she should be engaged in some employment 'less exhausting than governessing', such as being a companion to an elderly lady. States that he could enquire about such a position through Dr Symonds.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that the authorities at Trinity College have offered him the post of 'Lecturer on Moral Sciences' at £200 a year, on the understanding that he repudiate all dogmatic obligations. Intends to resign his fellowship. Reports that he has had a conversation with [Bishop] Lightfoot about his situation, and announces that he has been 'partly determined by his advice not to secede from the Church of England.' Discusses his position with regard to his beliefs, including his attitude towards the Apostles' Creed. Asks her to show the letter to Arthur. Admits to be very glad to be 'free from the anxiety of weighing pros and cons.' Mentions that his income will be seriously reduced, but that he shall have much more than enough to live on.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to forward his letters at once to the Marine College, Essex. Explains that they have been sent to Rugby, because he has 'a servant who thinks for himself...' States that he has been at his present address since the previous Wednesday. Thinks that he must give up the idea of going to Rugby. Explains that he has many visits to pay in July, and that, until his fever subsides he dreads railway travelling. Asks her to write and tell him about what she and the others are going to do in the holidays, and when she intends to leave Rugby. Promises that he shall try to come, 'at least for a night or two, before that.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he has discovered that the sea air does not cure hayfever. Describes Southend as 'not a bad little place', with no beauty, 'but cheerful enough and no Smells, to speak of.' States that he pays £1 a week for two little rooms, with an eating house next door, where he dines for a shilling. Reports that he is reading political economy and [Gewter], and that his eating house 'only takes in the Standard, where Protestantism is breathing less fire and slaughter than [he] had expected.'

Hopes that she has sent him his letters, because among them is 'an examination paper for Ladies' about which he is rather anxious. Remarks on the visitors to the area. Reports that he had considered going to Margate, but was afraid of being sea-sick. Resolves to come to similar places regularly in June, 'get iodized and then go back to London until the hayseason is over.' With regard to Mr Horton, undertakes to pay one third of £60 in two instalments of £10 per annum [for the education of Horton's son Fred], and states that when he agreed on their scheme he had in view his prospective decrease in income. Reports that he has just earned £10 by taking part in an entrance examination. Asks her to ask Arthur whether a Warrington whom he has examined [Thomas Rolls Warrington?] was a new boy in his form 'when he had a Boil.' Claims that he thought that he recognised his signature.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Informs her that if she thinks it worthwhile to take lodgings beforehand, he thinks that Ambleside 'will be as good a place as any other.' Also mentions Grasmere as a possibility for the first week, and then on to Borrowdale. Announces that he shall be ready to go 'about the 6th or 7th', and hopes that she will have seen William before this; did not think William seemed ill, but 'he is certainly somewhat nervous, languid and irresolute...' Believes, however, that he appeared to like the idea of going to the Lakes. States that he enjoyed his visit 'L.W.C.' [to Wellington College] very much; Mary seemed very well, and that the children were delightful. Reports that he had 'some intimate talk with Edward on religious subjects, which was thoroughly pleasant and satisfactory' to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he is still in Cambridge, 'tolerably well and taking great care of [his] health...' Expects the following term to be difficult. Refers to how he spends his days. Announces that he intends to stay there until the beginning of term, 'to see the last of [his] fellowship'. States that his position in the College 'in respect of rooms etc is still quite undetermined.' Refers to the candidates for fellowship. Announces that he expects 'a mild Hindoo', who is a pupil of Tawney's and a disappointed candidate for the Indian Civil Service, to come and see him on the following Friday. Reports that when he returned to Cambridge he discovered that one of the senior fellows at Trinity was in a lunatic asylum, and asks her to report this news to Arthur. Is pleased by the appointment of Seeley as the new professor of history, as the subject is 'at a very low ebb in Cambridge, and he is just the man to inspire an enthusiasm for it'; also always thought it a 'great loss to us' when Seeley went down. Asks after William.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Refers to an election in which Henry and others were 'triumphant'. Reports that he has received the marmalade from her and that it is very good. Claims to be 'very happy and comfortable'. Refers to his resignation of his fellowship and claims that he is certain that he has done right. Declares that he likes Miss [Alice] Horton's verses very much, and indicates that he would be happy to help her 'to imbibe fine literature and produce what she can.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Reports on how his days are spent. Mentions William's visit to his family home. Is glad to hear his mother's good account of Minnie. Reports that he had a letter from Edward [Benson] some days previously; believes him not to be 'the right man in the right place', and thinks of him as 'thrown away' in his role as headmaster. In relation to a proposed stay at Sydenham declares himself to be 'tolerably indifferent', and states that he only wants to be able to see her and have the opportunity of quiet study. Thinks however that it might be a bore 'going and settling down for a short time [especially Xmas time] in a place' where they know nobody and have no introductions. Asks if her idea includes Edward and Minnie. Gives his own ideas in relation to how the time should be spent; 'paying visits vaguely and spending the rest of the time at Cambridge', and a week or so at Rugby. His idea, however, does not include William. Admits that he would enjoy being near London. Reports that Arthur is very well 'under his gymnastics' Announces that he is going on Tuesday to stay a night with a friend 'who has been among the D[ ] and [ ]'. Informs her that there is a little book about the latter by Lord Carnarvon. Asks if she has seen Dr [Joseph?] Wolff's life.

Letter from Nora Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Since returning to England from Paris she has been very busy with various activities, which delayed her writing to Mary. It is very pleasant being settled in their own house in Cambridge, even though it is only a temporary one. Asks Mary when she intends to come to stay with her and Henry. They have got a cook, who is coming to them on 9 May for a month's trial period. Hopes that William and Isabel have arrived and are well, and sends her and Henry's love to them. Wishes that they could both come to see them, but is glad that William can see Mary. Adds that the cruet stand they want is a stand for oil and vinegar and sauces, and on the strength of what Mary said, Nora chose one in London that cost £7 or £8. Asks if they may wait about 'the other things' like china and glass, until they move into their new house, as they have the use of the Fawcett's things in the house where they are at present living. Sends a photograph of herself [not included], and explains that Henry's have not yet come. They only came to Cambridge from London the previous morning, but visited for a day the previous week as Henry had an examiners' meeting. Thinks the decoration of the house in which they are now living would amuse Mary; describes the drawing room, which they do not much like.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Discusses the 'Temple case' [about the controversy regarding Temple's essay in Essays and Reviews in 1860, re-ignited by his appointment as Bishop of Exeter]. Claims that he is not surprised that 'High Church men and Low Church men...are vexed at his appointment.' Remarks that nor is he inclined to blame Pusey 'for his passionate appeals to those who think with him'. Refers to his letters, and states that he thought that 'on the whole his position is quite reasonable and intelligible'. Believes that he [Pusey] 'is ready to accept Disestablishment with all it's [sic] disadvantages.' Feels indignant with 'certain Bishops, Deans, Canons etc who cling to the advantages of a National Establishment and yet kick against it's [sic] most obvious obligations...'

Does not yet know about his movements at Christmas, and has not quite made up his mind about going to Florence with Arthur. Thinks that Abbott would be a suitable candidate for the position of headmaster [of Rugby], but hears that he has no chance. Thinks that of those who do have a chance he would prefer Percival.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends to come to visit her 'from the 4th to the 11th'. Reports that he is up in Trinity College, working, and that he feels very well after a pleasant visit to Oxford. Reports that William seemed in very good spirits, and that he was sleeping 'very fairly' and hunts every other day. Desires to hear the Rugby news, and asks who are the five old Rugbeians. Reports that he wrote a letter to the Times, but that it was not published. Reports that he received a letter from his nephew Martin, which was 'very nicely written and with that curious mixture of childish and prematurely adult phraseology that one sees in a precocious child'. Asks her to tell him when Mary is going to visit her, and supposes that Edward will be very busy all the vacation.

Asks his mother's opinion on 'the new Tennyson'. States that they [in Trinity College] regard it 'as rather an imposition on the part of the publisher - republishing the Morte d'Arthur...and having so few lines in a page.' Complains that it is as bad as one of Victor Hugo's novels. Refers to a reading of the poem called The Higher Pantheism by Tennyson himself at a meeting of the Metaphysical Society, and to Tyndall's reaction to it. Remarks on 'how busy Death has been' during the previous six months among those whom he knows. Reports that he has just heard of the death of one of the Clifton Masters called Cay.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to ask Mr Horton what is the exact nature of information he requires, since he cannot ask [George Granville?] Bradley for information generally 'when he has given in the printed paper what [HS supposes] he thinks enough.' Suggests that Arthur could ask 'a [United] Usher.' Comments that the poem Lady Grace by Miss Smedley 'though not great is good reading.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Informs her that he intends to pay her a visit at Rugby early in August. Asks her to keep for him until he comes the box of books that he sent. Announces that he is going to 'roam for four days and then examine at Harrow.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he went 'up and down brooks, in Derbyshire and Yorkshire'; doesn't know whether he will be going anywhere that day. Asks her to pay for the Pall Mall Gazette at Tait's, as he had ordered it for a week, and it has been sent it for more.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to try to locate a book, [Pneumatologie:] Des Esprits... by Mirville, which was lent to him by Miss Attersoll, and which he gave to his mother 'some time ago'. Explains that Attersoll has written to him asking for it. Wonders whether she is 'a favourable subject for a convert', and intends to try to instil 'a little "Spiritualism" into her by recommending her another book or two of the same kind.' Reports that they expect their Greek professor to be elected the following day [Benjamin Hall Kennedy was chosen]. Refers to the fact that William is to write one of the Reform essays, and that it is advertised in the Pall Mall Gazette. Informs her that Mr and Mrs Paul are to come 'some time in the week after Easter.' Recommends a vendor of Hungarian wines, and suggests three labels. Hopes that Mr Martin is getting better, and reports that he went to see him the previous day. Admits that he is quite worried about his friend Cowell, whose father has just died very suddenly.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks for a portfolio 'exactly like Edward's that is with the "leg" attached to the frame'. Sends the enclosed item [not included] to be forwarded to his aunt. Sends his love to his aunt.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that the portfolio has come and is beautiful. Hopes to come to visit her 'on Saturday week', or before that. Announces that the Pauls are to come on Easter Monday, and will stay for the week, and that he himself has to go back to Cambridge on the Monday afterwards. States that his friend Sedley Taylor is going to Rugby around Good Friday to stay with [Rev.?] C. J. Smith, and asks her to be hospitable to him if he turns up at the house. Thanks her for the portfolio. Hopes that she is well and has enjoyed her visits.

Reports that he is 'tolerably busy', and that he goes to see Roden Noel on the following Saturday - 'the day of the [boat] race'. Remarks that it is thought that Cambridge is to lose again. Reports that Tawney is coming to England that summer to be married. Reports that he has been in correspondence with his uncle Robert 'about a curious historical question connected with the founding of Shipton School', whose Master 'is bound to pray to the Virgin Mary every afternoon.' Mentions that he met a lady the previous day at [Rampride] who said that she knew his mother and Mrs Plunkett.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Apologises for not having written to say that he had received the portfolio, and claims that it 'suits beautifully'. Intends to come to visit on Friday or Thursday.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends spending Thursday night in London, and will come down to her in the afternoon of Good Friday. Discusses the suggestion made by William to invite his friend Robert Williams - a newly elected fellow of Merton - to Rugby. Opposes the idea on the grounds of its 'extreme oddness', without having made further acquaintance. Announces that Mr and Mrs Paul are to come on Easter Monday.

Letter from Nora Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick.

Reports on the progress of their [honeymoon] journey: they reached Dover 'without adventure', and had a smooth crossing [to Calais], then a pleasant, but dusty, rail journey to Amiens. They have been to see the cathedral, which is beautiful. They intend going to Paris the following afternoon, and hope to get rooms at the Hôtel Bedford, Rue de l'Arcade. Is sorry she did not see Mary nearly as much as she had hoped to the previous day, but notes that Henry says that Mary promised to come to Cambridge to see them soon. Henry sends his love, and he hopes that Mary had a satisfactory interview with Dr Andrew Clark.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he finished his Marlborough examination on the previous Tuesday, and intends to cross the channel on Monday evening. Intends to stay one month in Paris with Graham Dakyns, and then shall probably spend a fortnight walking in Switzerland 'or somewhere', after which he shall 'probably settle down for a month in Germany', and return about mid-September. Supposes that by that time she will be well settled in Rugby. Regrets not having seen her at Wellington College, where he had a most pleasant visit. Was pleased to find both Mary and Edward so well. Comments on the ugliness of the new baby [Arthur Benson]; needs to do this to keep his 'character as a baby-hater', since he is 'compelled to join in the general Martin-worship'. Claims to have enjoyed his examinations on the whole, and to have been freer from hayfever than usual. Refers to the fact that 'poor Dale had lost two of his boys from Diptheria', and comments that it is supposed to be an unhealthy season at Dresden. Hopes to go there in the summer. Praises Marlborough, and reports that the boys 'are very nice and their relations with the masters more what one w[oul]d desire than at any other school with which [he is] acquainted.' States that he was very much interested in the Isle of Man, and was surprised to learn that his uncle Lace was a benefactor to King William's College there. Sends his love to his aunt.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Refers to their lack of correspondence, to Edward, and to 'the latest news from Wellington College'. Announces that he is going to see their mother the following day, and plans to go to Paris at some point. States that if he goes, it will probably be with Graham Dakyns, 'who is desirous of learning French in order to qualify himself for a Government Clerkship.' Claims that the only real method of combining amusement with instruction 'is by learning a foreign language on it's [sic] proper soil.' States that he remembers firmly resolving to write to her on the twentieth of the previous month 'to condole with [her] on coming of age. Relates a humorous incident that occurred to him that day involving his addressing himself to the wrong man in Macmillans [bookshop?] Tells her to write to her in Leamington, and mentions the kinds of things he likes to read about in letters. Reports that he has not been doing anything literary that term, and has been 'lazily absorbing philosophy, history and politics.' Claims that he is 'engaged on a Great Work', but explains that he has invented this explanation as a reply to those who ask him what he is doing. [Incomplete].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he would like to hold a dinner party, to which he would invite Temple, [Jex-]Blake, Scott, Wilson, Kitchener, Philpotts, [Lee?] Warner, or some of them. States that she may leave the 'other matter' until he comes. Explains that he does not want [Robert] Williams asked as his friend, as he has only just met him, and believes it to be quite strange 'to make that sort of advances to men'. Undertakes to entertain the man if he is asked entirely on his mother's and William's account. States that he will come on Friday at 7.

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